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I'm flying to Thailand next month and have a bit of a dilemma. I'm getting a 60 day visa and will enter Thailand on July 2nd. I might stay longer than 60 days, in which case I know I can extend the visa for another 30 days. Here's what's confusing:

I need to show proof of a return or onward ticket to the airline before I board the plane... So, if I intend to stay longer than 60 days, I must still buy a ticket that leaves earlier?

I have heard of return tickets with open dates, but I will not be returning to Germany.

I have also heard of "booking" the ticket but not paying for it, but I have never seen such an option on any ticket website. Is this a possibility?

How can this work?
If you want to be totally safe, buy a refundable air ticket out. Print it out and show it to the airline. Then refund it when you get to Thailand.

However I've never had an airline ask me to show an onward ticket. If they ask you at immigration in Thailand (<1% chance), tell them you're going to take a bus to Cambodia. Could even print out an online travel blog article on how to go from BKK to Siem Reap or something.
(06-25-2012 07:18 AM)trey Wrote: [ -> ]However I've never had an airline ask me to show an onward ticket.

That's what I've seen others say. The reason for this is actually that you must show the return / onward ticket when you apply for the 60-day tourist visa in the first place, so either way you need one.

I just looked into this. The refund will take months and that's after cancellation fees. Someone suggests to buy the cheapest ticket with Air Asia and just take the small loss. A one-way ticket to Yangon for August 28th is 55€. Non-refundable.

It looks like the best solution so far. Thanks.

Another question.

I know there are plenty of hotels on Khao San but I've also read it is inconveniently located. Should I look for something in a different part of town and, if so, does anyone recommend any specific hotels or neighbourhoods? Or is it not that big of a deal?
If you don't want to book a return flight or proof of onward travel then you need to get your 60 day tourist visa from your local Thai consulate. When you have that you don't need to show any proof on onward travel to the airline, Thai immigration has already granted you permission to travel to their country.

If you were going without the visa and just getting a stamp on arrival you are expected to have proof of onward travel but whether you get asked for proof depends on the airline, proof of onward travel could be a train ticket which can possibly be booked online and wouldn't cost much. Alternatively AirAsia do cheap flights to Kuala Lumpur and Phnom Penh, you could buy one and just not use it.

I've never had problems going to Thailand (and have travelled one way before) but British Airways once refused to allow me to board a flight from UK to Rio as my return flight was 4 months later (you get 3 months on arrival to Brazil if from UK) and no amount of explaining to them that I was travelling around South America seemed to matter. Eventually I got the manager who OK'd me to fly but it was close, they were talking about getting my bag off the flight (was already at departure gate and about to board the flight). So it does happen sometimes and probably not worth the risk, it'll be the airline and not Thai immigration that will ask for it.

As I say get the visa and you're fine, no proof needed if they have granted you it. I've heard of people being asked to show proof when they apply for visa but it's never happened to me.
Thanks, AlphaTravel. Unfortunately showing a return or onward ticket is required for getting the 60-day tourist visa in the first place. I asked by the consulate today. Go figure.
I usually fly to Kuala Lumpur when I go to Thailand, then it's just a short trip to Southern Thailand, sure Malaysia don't have same problems.

After 30 days I do a visa run back to Malaysia, haven't been for a few years though, maybe things have changed
I got multi-entry 60 day tourist visa from Thai embassy in Hull, UK (no return ticket required) and flew 1-way with Singapore Air (no return required).

And Thai immigration just stamped it each entry, no questions or proof of anything else required.

The Hull embassy is renowned for giving out visas very easily. I dont know if you can apply as a German to it (maybe?), but I guess you'd need to airmail them your passport for the application which might be hassle.

edit: yeah the 55euro ticket to burma is probably alot easier, if that means you meet the requirements.
(06-25-2012 08:14 AM)Fathom Wrote: [ -> ]The refund will take months and that's after cancellation fees.

Find an airline that doesn't have cancellation fees, or use a good credit card, usually you can get around that kind of thing.

Still get the money back with a refund, even if it takes a few months. Better than burning 55 euros on a flight you won't take.

Also, as other people have said, some consulates are way easier than others.
Quote:I usually fly to Kuala Lumpur when I go to Thailand, then it's just a short trip to Southern Thailand, sure Malaysia don't have same problems.

After 30 days I do a visa run back to Malaysia, haven't been for a few years though, maybe things have changed

Doesn't really make any sense to fly to KL and then have to travel to Thailand when he can just travel direct to Thailand with a 60 day visa and a cheap air asia flight that he won't use. Will cost the same anyway and means no extra travel time between KL and Thailand needed. Also no point in doing a visa run after 30 days when it works out cheaper to get the 60 day visa (which you can extend by a further 30 days) before leaving home.
Easy and inexpensive to get the 60-day?
(06-25-2012 02:13 PM)Deb Auchery Wrote: [ -> ]Easy and inexpensive to get the 60-day?

The lady at the consulate here in Hamburg said it takes ten minutes.

I think buying the cheap ticket with Air Asia is the best option. Hell, I might even use it for a weekend excursion.
(06-25-2012 02:59 PM)Fathom Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-25-2012 02:13 PM)Deb Auchery Wrote: [ -> ]Easy and inexpensive to get the 60-day?

The lady at the consulate here in Hamburg said it takes ten minutes.

I think buying the cheap ticket with Air Asia is the best option. Hell, I might even use it for a weekend excursion.

For what it is worth I HAD a ticket to return but was never asked to show proof (I had not printed it out either). When I got to thailand I literally just showed up got my passport stamped, they took my picture, and I walked in. They did not ask me any questions. I also know for a fact my friend went there with out a return ticket period and they let him in.

I think as long as you do not look like a poor backpacker you will be fine. Although I suppose it is good to be safe, I think most of these countries are not nearly as rigid as some people make them out to be (or maybe I am just lucky). For instance, I was told singapore's security is VERY strict you need to show onward plane ticket, proof of hotel, proof of income etc. I literally got there with no proof of onward ticket (just a flight number i memorized) or proof of hotel (granted I told them I was just staying a few nights) and they let me in.
(06-25-2012 02:13 PM)Deb Auchery Wrote: [ -> ]Easy and inexpensive to get the 60-day?

£25 in the UK and if you go to consulate it'll be done within the hour. I send my application in the post and get it back within few days. This visa can be extended by a further 30 days at any Thai immigration office for 1,900B.

A standard 30 day arrival stamp can only be extended for 7 days at immigration and still costs 1,900B and crossing the border and coming back over now only gets you 15 days. Add in the cost and hassle of doing a visa run or going to the border and it's not worth it.


(06-25-2012 11:03 PM)NewToPUA Wrote: [ -> ]For what it is worth I HAD a ticket to return but was never asked to show proof (I had not printed it out either). When I got to thailand I literally just showed up got my passport stamped, they took my picture, and I walked in. They did not ask me any questions. I also know for a fact my friend went there with out a return ticket period and they let him in.

I think as long as you do not look like a poor backpacker you will be fine. Although I suppose it is good to be safe, I think most of these countries are not nearly as rigid as some people make them out to be (or maybe I am just lucky). For instance, I was told singapore's security is VERY strict you need to show onward plane ticket, proof of hotel, proof of income etc. I literally got there with no proof of onward ticket (just a flight number i memorized) or proof of hotel (granted I told them I was just staying a few nights) and they let me in.

Thai immigration are not the problem, it's being allowed on the flight by your airline. They will be the ones who refuse you if anyone does. They tend to be quite strict these days as they can get fined for not following official rules even if no one at the country your going to's immigration follows them. Better to have something sorted just in case, either a visa or the cheap Air Asia flight you won't use.
I was traveling to a place where I was required to have a return ticket, which I didn't yet have. They were about to refuse me check-in.

So I went to the ticket counter of the airline I was flying with and put on my most charming face. Asked the ticket agent if she'd be able to print off a 'hold' reservation slip for me. Ticket agents can do this without payment. I don't know how it works, but I think the hold expires after a certain period of time if it isn't confirmed or paid for. In any case the slip you get looks exactly like a real itinerary / booking confirmation and should be good enough. It lets the people at check-in tick the box and let you through.

You'll have to ask nicely though because she was clearly going beyond the call of duty to do me a favour.
AlphaTravel is correct. I've flown into Thailand twice in the past year and I wasn't asked for proof of ongoing travel. Thai law states you need to show proof, but immigration will let you through if you don't look like a dirt squirrel.

The airline flying you in will often refuse to board you though, because they're obligated to fly you out in the event that you get refused. In my case, Air Canada wouldn't have let me board if I hadn't bought an air asia flight to phnom penh.

You could do the same, but in retrospect, aren't many first class tickets fully refundable? Could save you eighty bucks.
Quote:So I went to the ticket counter of the airline I was flying with and put on my most charming face. Asked the ticket agent if she'd be able to print off a 'hold' reservation slip for me. Ticket agents can do this without payment. I don't know how it works, but I think the hold expires after a certain period of time if it isn't confirmed or paid for. In any case the slip you get looks exactly like a real itinerary / booking confirmation and should be good enough. It lets the people at check-in tick the box and let you through.

You'll have to ask nicely though because she was clearly going beyond the call of duty to do me a favour.

In the story I mentioned above about almost being refused going to Rio I had something similar happen. I had to fly from one place in UK to Heathrow, it was at the first point they tried to refuse me. When I got to Heathrow I went to the British Airways desk and told them what had happened as I was concerned I might have the same thing happen all over again when trying to board this flight. The agent printed me out a 'fake' ticket, she put the details of a return flight into the system and then printed it off without confirming it. It wasn't an actual ticket but when printed out had British Airways logo on it and looked legit. No one ever asked for it.
Update: I entered Thailand with no visa, having already bought an ticket to Laos within thirty-days after my arrival. The grumpy little dude at passport control didn't even look at it, they simple marked my required exit date thirty days from now.
Thai immigration were never going to be the problem. As stated it is the airlines that cause problems. You could potentially not be allowed to board the flight.
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