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As much as I love going to new places, traveling wrecks havoc on my stomach. At home I eat very cleanly but when I travel i'm stuck eating food that isn't very healthy, good, or filling. Not to mention my alcohol consumption increases 10 fold which doesn't help things.

On a recent three day trip, I packed three days worth of protein powder mixed with psyllium husk so I can continue to take my evening protein shake. I also packed my supplements as well.

Yet, i'm still struggling with my stomach being uneasy because of all of the food. Do you guys have any tips and tricks on mitigating or removing stomach uneasiness from bad food?
I don't think there's much you can do, especially in third world countries.

I just take general precautions.
-Make sure the restaurant you go to is popular with locals.
-If that doesn't help, just buy prepared meals/sandwiches at 7-11 or go to McDonalds (though that's not 100% guarantee either).
Faak

I have been ill to my stomach for the last 2 months of a 8 month stint here in Peru. I got real sick to my stomach about two months ago and haven't been the same since. I feel like I have a tape worm.... or herpes... or both. Ever since I got sick I dont have much of a appetite even though I'm pretty hungry most of the time if that makes any sense. Its like I'm hungry but food just doesnt appeal to me, I can't ever think of anything I want to eat. I get some raunchy gas to and my guts just always a little unsettling. I havent been to the gym in 2 months except for two two day stints but after those two days I'm dead ass tired the next 3 days. RIP Gainz.

The illness manifested into a form of depression.. now I just sit in my room and cry... just kidding. (unless your offering a shoulder)
I havent been going to the gym or gaming bitches... Its been so long since I opened a girl I forgot how to ask where the pet shop is in Espanol.

But you know what they say, "Fuck it"
Heading to Cali in a few days and hopefully that will rejuvenate me.
(05-02-2015 08:56 AM)The Beast1 Wrote: [ -> ]At home I eat very cleanly

This. Your gut is a perfectly clean aseptic environment that does not tolerates any outsider.

Strenghten up your gut bioma by eating lots of live cultures like kimchee or natural yoghurt.

Dont eat any processed foods, its not that they are bad, its just that they are sterile, devoid of any bacteria, either harmful or beneficial.

Even if you eat only at clean places and drink only bottled water, there will be bacteria in the environment which your body is notaccustomed to. By ensuring your system is full of beneficial bacteria your body knows and tolerate, you are makings sure foreign bacteria cant stablish a foothold in your body.
(05-02-2015 08:56 AM)The Beast1 Wrote: [ -> ]As much as I love going to new places, traveling wrecks havoc on my stomach. At home I eat very cleanly but when I travel i'm stuck eating food that isn't very healthy, good, or filling. Not to mention my alcohol consumption increases 10 fold which doesn't help things.

On a recent three day trip, I packed three days worth of protein powder mixed with psyllium husk so I can continue to take my evening protein shake. I also packed my supplements as well.

Yet, i'm still struggling with my stomach being uneasy because of all of the food. Do you guys have any tips and tricks on mitigating or removing stomach uneasiness from bad food?

Take Zinc + vitamin C, in higher doses. If you can handle it, take Habeneros or Thai peppers with you and eat them or mix in your food. It kills any bacteria in your stomach and boosts your immune system temporarily, just like Zinc would.
(05-02-2015 06:55 PM)TravelerKai Wrote: [ -> ]take Habeneros or Thai peppers with you and eat them or mix in your food. It kills any bacteria in your stomach and boosts your immune system temporarily, just like Zinc would.

Any link on that "hot pepper bacteria killing" properties?

If your stomach uneasyness includes a case of the runs, peppers are the last thing you want to eat.
Yeah I eat a lot of greek yogurt, but my problem is poor quality food at restaurants and an even worse breakfast. I loathe eating out 3 meals when I travel. The quality of ingredients is always poor at dining establishments.

This time around I pre-packed my protein shake mix, blender, and supplements but boy those hotel breakfasts just destroy me. How they can call it food is beyond me.

Eating prepared food is the bane of me. I hate eating out at home, eating out while traveling is worse. The stress and poor quality food does me in.

I guess this is one of those things i'll have to learn to live with it and do my best to keep my daily food and supplement routine in tact as possible.
At worst, I buy canned tuna and crackers. Add some mayo and Tabaco sauce. Or bread and cheese.
I have been living on peanut butter sammiches
This happened to me in china... I got voilently sick from something, ran a huge fever on the plane home (jacket on, sweater sweatpants 2 blankets) and was still shivering uncontrollably. Lucky I found my Advil and it calmed my fever. Still threw up in the plane toilet three times.

Took a 5 day 80 bill probiotic from the fridge at vitamin shoppe. Cleared me out for about 5 days straight, started getting better after that. Then I drank like a fish with the company I'm working with at a Chinese restaurant on my second trip back on my birthday... Fuckin heavy shits and pain again. No one else who was with me had the same issues. That was 3 weeks ago. And now I'm still spotty. I still have runs here and there. Fucking aggravating as fuck bruh I feel your pain. Probiotics seem to help but I'm using them sparingly as I'm running out. I have antibiotics but not using them unless I have to.

Right now I feel pretty good though. If you can find probiotics that's my suggestion along with a good multi. Authentic kimchi is good if you can find it, sauerkraut is decent. Most yogurt doesn't have all the great live bacteria islt claims, it's not bad but it's not as good as you'd think - there was some research on that not long ago.
(05-02-2015 03:41 PM)Cr33pin Wrote: [ -> ]Faak

I have been ill to my stomach for the last 2 months of a 8 month stint here in Peru. I got real sick to my stomach about two months ago and haven't been the same since. I feel like I have a tape worm.... or herpes... or both. Ever since I got sick I dont have much of a appetite even though I'm pretty hungry most of the time if that makes any sense. Its like I'm hungry but food just doesnt appeal to me, I can't ever think of anything I want to eat. I get some raunchy gas to and my guts just always a little unsettling. I havent been to the gym in 2 months except for two two day stints but after those two days I'm dead ass tired the next 3 days. RIP Gainz.

I remember Roosh saying his stomach was messed up for months after he returned from a trip to South America.

That's one thing I hate about traveling is stomach issues. Every time I eat I wonder if I'm going to be spewing from both ends in a few hours. It really takes away from the enjoyment of trying new cuisine.
Hehe. I lived off street gyros in Europe and meat-on-a-stick in Thailand, literally the dirtiest low-quality foods one can eat. I was glued to the toilet more times than I can count.

The plus side is I think my immune system has been buffered to the point...no bacteria can touch me.

Seriously, during my last Thailand trip...I ate street food with reckless abandon while my buddies were constantly running to the shitter.

Eventually, you just build up a tolerance. The problem - in America at least - is we live in an oversantized environment. Our immune systems our very fragile compared to people in the 3rd world.

Eating probiotic rich food certainly helps though.
(05-03-2015 09:21 AM)The Beast1 Wrote: [ -> ]Yeah I eat a lot of greek yogurt, but my problem is poor quality food at restaurants and an even worse breakfast. I loathe eating out 3 meals when I travel. The quality of ingredients is always poor at dining establishments.

This time around I pre-packed my protein shake mix, blender, and supplements but boy those hotel breakfasts just destroy me. How they can call it food is beyond me.

Eating prepared food is the bane of me. I hate eating out at home, eating out while traveling is worse. The stress and poor quality food does me in.

I guess this is one of those things i'll have to learn to live with it and do my best to keep my daily food and supplement routine in tact as possible.

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/1998...res-it-hot

Quote:March 4, 1998

Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot

Fans of hot, spicy cuisine can thank nasty bacteria and other foodborne pathogens for the recipes that come -- not so coincidentally -- from countries with hot climates. Humans' use of antimicrobial spices developed in parallel with food-spoilage microorganisms, Cornell University biologists have demonstrated in a international survey of spice use in cooking.

The same chemical compounds that protect the spiciest spice plants from their natural enemies are at work today in foods from parts of the world where -- before refrigeration -- food-spoilage microbes were an even more serious threat to human health and survival than they are today, Jennifer Billing and Paul W. Sherman report in the March 1998 issue of the journal Quarterly Review of Biology.

"The proximate reason for spice use obviously is to enhance food palatability," says Sherman, an evolutionary biologist and professor of neurobiology and behavior at Cornell. "But why do spices taste good? Traits that are beneficial are transmitted both culturally and genetically, and that includes taste receptors in our mouths and our taste for certain flavors. People who enjoyed food with antibacterial spices probably were healthier, especially in hot climates. They lived longer and left more offspring. And they taught their offspring and others: 'This is how to cook a mastodon.' We believe the ultimate reason for using spices is to kill food-borne bacteria and fungi."

Sherman credits Billing, a Cornell undergraduate student of biology at the time of the research, with compiling many of the data required to make the microbe-spice connection: More than 4,570 recipes from 93 cookbooks representing traditional, meat-based cuisines of 36 countries; the temperature and precipitation levels of each country; the horticultural ranges of 43 spice plants; and the antibacterial properties of each spice.

Garlic, onion, allspice and oregano, for example, were found to be the best all-around bacteria killers (they kill everything), followed by thyme, cinnamon, tarragon and cumin (any of which kill up to 80 percent of bacteria). Capsicums, including chilies and other hot peppers, are in the middle of the antimicrobial pack (killing or inhibiting up to 75 percent of bacteria), while pepper of the white or black variety inhibits 25 percent of bacteria, as do ginger, anise seed, celery seed and the juices of lemons and limes.

The Cornell researchers report in the article, "Countries with hotter climates used spices more frequently than countries with cooler climates. Indeed, in hot countries nearly every meat-based recipe calls for at least one spice, and most include many spices, especially the potent spices, whereas in cooler counties substantial fractions of dishes are prepared without spices, or with just a few." As a result, the estimated fraction of food-spoilage bacteria inhibited by the spices in each recipe is greater in hot than in cold climates.

Accordingly, countries like Thailand, the Philippines, India and Malaysia are at the top of the hot climate-hot food list, while Sweden, Finland and Norway are at the bottom. The United States and China are somewhere in the middle, although the Cornell researchers studied these two countries' cuisines by region and found significant latitude-related correlations. Which helps explain why crawfish etouf┼Że is spicier than New England clam chowder.

The biologists did consider several alternative explanations for spice use and discounted all but one. The problem with the "eat-to-sweat" hypothesis -- that people in steamy places eat spicy food to cool down with perspiration -- is that not all spices make people sweat, Sherman says, "and there are better ways to cool down -- like moving into the shade." The idea that people use spices to disguise the taste of spoiled food, he says, "ignores the health dangers of ingesting spoiled food." And people probably aren't eating spices for their nutritive value, the biologist says, because the same macronutrients are available in similar amounts in common vegetables, which are eaten in much greater quantities.

However the micronutrient hypothesis -- that spices provide trace amounts of anti-oxidants or other chemicals to aid digestion -- could be true and still not exclude the antimicrobial explanation, Sherman says. However, this hypothesis does not explain why people in hot climates need more micro-nutrients, he adds. The antimicrobial hypothesis does explain this.

The study of Darwinian gastronomy is a bit of a stretch for an evolutionary biologist like Sherman, who normally focuses his research on the role of natural selection in animal social behavior and is best known for his studies of one of nature's most social (and unusual-looking) creatures, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) of Africa. But eating is definitely one of the more social behavior of Homo sapienss, he maintains, and it's a good way to see the interaction between cultural evolution and biological function. "I believe that recipes are a record of the history of the coevolutionary race between us and our parasites. The microbes are competing with us for the same food," Sherman says. "Everything we do with food -- drying, cooking, smoking, salting or adding spices -- is an attempt to keep from being poisoned by our microscopic competitors. They're constantly mutating and evolving to stay ahead of us. One way we reduce food-borne illnesses is to add another spice to the recipe. Of course that makes the food taste different, and the people who learn to like the new taste are healthier for it."

For biology student Billing, the spice research for a senior honors thesis took her to an unfamiliar field, food science, and to the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration, where the library contains one of the world's largest collections of cookbooks. Now that the bacteria-spice connection is revealed, librarians everywhere may want to cross-index cookbooks under "food safety." And spice racks may start appearing in pharmacies.
(05-03-2015 08:21 PM)Chick Magnet Wrote: [ -> ]Hehe. I lived off street gyros in Europe and meat-on-a-stick in Thailand, literally the dirtiest low-quality foods one can eat. I was glued to the toilet more times than I can count.

The plus side is I think my immune system has been buffered to the point...no bacteria can touch me.

Seriously, during my last Thailand trip...I ate street food with reckless abandon while my buddies were constantly running to the shitter.

Eventually, you just build up a tolerance. The problem - in America at least - is we live in an oversantized environment. Our immune systems our very fragile compared to people in the 3rd world.

Eating probiotic rich food certainly helps though.

cosign

Had you eaten that Thai food spicy, you would have been far less likely to get the shits. I never got diarrhea, even once, in China because I ate everything spicy pretty much. You kinda have to do something because the amount of bacteria crawling around on food in certain Asian countries is something no one from the US or UK is used to. Gutter oil and open air cooked food is almost unavoidable in Asia. The only other way to avoid it is to pay up and buy expensive lunches and dinners from higher quality places.

One tip I have never mentioned before was one time in Changsha, I went out for sushi, and they had them rotating under a heat lamp on display!! I was like WTF?! So I asked them to get me some off the top of the ice at the sushi chef's bar. I guarantee you had I eaten the others rotating under that heat, inside that empty restaurant, I would have been pooping for hours.

Sometimes you have to think outside the box and use good common sense. You cannot change the way they do stuff to match your ways, so ask or seek alternative means.
Quote:I remember Roosh saying his stomach was messed up for months after he returned from a trip to South America.

Not months, years. Only now is it pretty close to how it was before.
For me, its not so much stomach issues when I travel... it's colds and sore throats I invariably pick up while traveling.

The only case of food poisoning I got was right here in the USA, where we supposedly have FDA and food safety inspections to protect the citizens. *rolleyes*
(05-04-2015 07:46 AM)CleanSlate Wrote: [ -> ]For me, its not so much stomach issues when I travel... it's colds and sore throats I invariably pick up while traveling.

The only case of food poisoning I got was right here in the USA, where we supposedly have FDA and food safety inspections to protect the citizens. *rolleyes*

That's easy.

[Image: airborne.jpg]

Or take a high hit of zinc and C before the flight.
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