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If you were to take over a village by the sea, and run it like a fiefdom, where would it be, and why?

I'm interested to hear from members, from all your travels, which costal towns, villages, rugged outcrops have you come across where you could see yourself settling down and making a life, or having a regular holiday home?

It would be useful to hear experiences. If money were no object/or if land is so affordable that it doesn't matter anywhere, where would your coastal paradise be?

It'd be good to get a rough scoring too on food, wine, women, cultural opportunities within easy travel etc etc.

Lakes, lochs, and major rivers can also be considered, but I'm specifically interested in places by water.
Great thread idea H1N1. I'd like to say that my ideal spot would be somewhere tropical say in SE Asia or the Caribbean but the truth is that my Celtic blood just can't handle that level of heat and humidity, typhoons and hurricanes kind of suck too. So, I would prefer to live in a colder climate even if that means suffering through a few months of winter each year, as such my two picks of places that I have visited would be:

Northern Vancouver Island, Canada: This place offers spectacular scenery and is a nature lovers paradise. I spent a week up there and went salmon fishing and scuba diving, the landscape is very rugged and the amount of wild life I saw there (whales, bears, eagles, cougars, sea lions, etc) was amazing. It was the site of the History Channel TV series ALone which a lot of guys on RVF watched.




Cape Breton Island, Canada Much less remote than Vancouver Island with easy access to the US Eastern Seaboard but with the similar rugged beauty, this is where my family is from and where I'll likely end up retiring one day.




As you can see, I prefer rural places surrounded by water, both salt and fresh with clean air, good hunting and fishing with small homogeneous populations of friendly people who aren't caught up in big city lifestyles or modern trends. Such places could be difficult to adapt to for a city person but I grew up in a small town and am a pretty big red neck so these types of places suit me very well. The down side is that there's not much for work opportunities there so I'll have to work for another twenty years or so before I retire and build my dream cabin on a cove somewhere with a small boat, ATVs and guns, lots of fucking guns.
Right now I am settled in Pocitos, Montevideo, Uruguay. It is a very international barrio (formerly vacation village but Montevideo swallowed it) in a fairly international city. By South American standards shit here is expensive. Compared to similarly developed countries, it is a bargain unless you are looking for buy electronics.

Year round there is steady access to a variety of Latinas from all over the Spanish speaking world... and Brazil who have decided to immigrate here. In the summer (December through March or April) you get a bounty of tourists. Uruguay has 3.5 million residents and sees 4-5 million tourists annually. Living in a hostel here for nearly seven months I like the place. The Uruguayos suck as a people, but they ineffectual government and Latinas more than make up for it. By Latinas I mean the girls who aren't Uruguayas, there's some profound cultural failures present in the locals which merits separating them from the rest of the Latin Americans. The Uruguayas tend to either be smoke shows that age rapidly from tobacco and Mate abuse or fat non-people. The other Latinas tend to preserve their cultures when they relocate here.

That said if you have every fantasized about going to another planet and being the alien who is better than all the locals at everything, Uruguay is the place to do it, Montevideo's the only real city here, and Pocitos has the most favorable combination of demographics and amenities for me. Be warned however that the Uruguayo culture delights in attempting to cut the tall poppies down. Expect to have to babysit tenured professionals and hunt for typos any time you need to sign a document. On the plus side the criminals are incompetent, and any of them with talent or ambition skip to blowing up ATMs and robbing Cambios.

Actually running this place is unnecessary. Gringo priviledge means the incompetence of the local competent authorities is such that with A1 Spanish fluency, native command of the English language, and understanding of the local culture you can routinely dictate terms and enforce them with eye contact. The local male competition tends to be rather effeminate from sustained cannabis and Mate overindulgence. The great paradox here is that none of the Uruguayas will fuck you for being gringo, but they (and probably many Uruguayos) will fuck you for behaving gringo. I routinely show up to business meeting here where everyone else is trying to wear their best and my bermuda shorts and short sleeve button up commands the room (doubly so now that its winter and my Spanish is better).

With every other foreigner not being a Uruguayo is an easy path to building rapport. With the Uruguayos the phrase "En todo el mundo" gets them to make exceptions to their brain damaged processes.

In short: beaches, girlies, and complete lack of male competition wins the day.

Edit: wine: excellent, Food: can be great, Women: Mixed yet easy bag
This one thread might bring the gmanifesto out of retirement.
I think the gmanifesto has a strict policy of not talking about villages by the sea, as they fill up with 'weesh dudes'.

That said, here is a place from my childhood. I remember sailing up the river from the sea with my family. I had the happiest childhood holiday of my life there. I was 11, a year or two before it first started to be a drag to have my parents as my sole company for a whole week. It is one of the places that has really stuck with me over the years.

It is in Devon, one of the most beautiful counties in England, on the South Coast.

It is an affluent place, the average house price is probably pushing a million dollars - it's about £600k I believe. Consequently, there is a lot of very fine pussy there throughout the year.

The town itself is busy, but five minutes in any direction takes you into some of the loveliest and most unspoilt English countryside.

There are a lot of excellent restaurants, but even better it is possible to buy fresh fish from the local fishermen each night, and pick wild samphire. Incredibly fresh fish, with fresh samphire, and a knob of butter, is one of the simplest and most delicious meals you could ask for.

There is a lifeboat station. The RNLI is a charity that runs the lifeboats, and each station is staffed by local volunteers and they are very brave men. I grew up on the water and am a fairly competent sailor. I'm proud of our maritime history, and being a lifeboat volunteer is something I've always felt I might do once I was older and my energies were not overwhelmingly focused on earning money.

It being England, one can source the food and wine one wants easily, one speaks the language, and a place like this could very easily become home. I would keep a boat, and have a house on the water.

It is also only a couple of hours from London, so one could easily maintain a flat in the city too.

Here is a picture or two:

[Image: 0A773AA5000005DC-0-image-a-31_1432510398683.jpg]

[Image: salcombe-devon-picture-id506781194]
Nowhere beats the Med for these flights of fancy.
I quite like certain small villages dotted along Montenegro's coast line, zero English speakers to be found, beautiful coastline, amazing weather in summer and insanely cheap.
Delete
(06-24-2018 03:07 PM)Nordwand Wrote: [ -> ]Maybe too small for your liking, however:

https://www.ouest-france.fr/normandie/en...ue-5774970

http://en.normandie-tourisme.fr/discover...106-2.html

mont st michel is probably the most over rated tourist attraction in France, that includes anything you'd see in paris. Very small, signs are ALL in english, korean and chinese. Just a huge tourist trap. Super boring, the architecture is cool, but its all the same thing

sorry just had to rant about it, was ssuper excited to see it and then was let down
(06-24-2018 05:57 PM)Cortés Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-24-2018 03:07 PM)Nordwand Wrote: [ -> ]Maybe too small for your liking, however:

https://www.ouest-france.fr/normandie/en...ue-5774970

http://en.normandie-tourisme.fr/discover...106-2.html

mont st michel is probably the most over rated tourist attraction in France, that includes anything you'd see in paris. Very small, signs are ALL in english, korean and chinese. Just a huge tourist trap. Super boring, the architecture is cool, but its all the same thing

sorry just had to rant about it, was ssuper excited to see it and then was let down

Very true.
Mont St Michel was the only place in Europe I got a threesome and girls were very open to daygame. Is it that bad now?
I've never been to Mont St Michel, so I'm very sad to hear that my fantasy doesn't match reality. I have, however, been to, and can vouch for, here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savonlinna

Not really a village, and not by the sea, but it has plenty of water around it, not to mention this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olavinlinna
If this is a real question and not just a fantasy thread, I have read articles about the Abruzzo region of Italy for the past year or so.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abruzzo

This region includes both the mountains and a coastal area. I have been amazed by the real estate prices in this very temperate area of the world. You can buy houses that are hundreds of years old for next to nothing. If you rent, your budget could be in the neighborhood of $20,000 a year. If you bought a place, it would be more like $12,000 a year. I am sure that your budget would be far higher if you are located right at the shore. Some examples (I am not sure how far these places are from the shore):

Quote:Example of Real Estate on Offer in Abruzzo

For example, near the 16th-century thermal spring town of Caramanico, is a pair of 200-year-old apartments, one partially restored, the other not at all restored but with vaulted ceilings. The price for the pair, with 200 square meters between them, has recently been reduced from 83,000 euro to 65,000 euro. That’s 325 euro per square meter. The properties boast features like fireplaces, large Majella stone slabs (these, from the nearby mountains, that today would cost 350 euro apiece), a garden, and a terrace and could be converted into ideal rentals.

Then there’s an old watermill, characteristic of the region but difficult to find for sale today. However, this one in Abruzzo currently on the market is about 100 years old, nestled in an extraordinary setting, private and surrounded by nature, but only five minutes from the nearest restaurant and 10 minutes from the nearest town. In other words, ideal for a B&B project.

The property is about an acre in total, with a small river running along one edge, and, in addition to the brick and stone mill, contains various outbuildings and other stone structures that could be converted to guesthouses. The price has been reduced from 155,000 euro to 135,000 euro.

Living Costs in Abruzzo, Italy

As always, expenses depend on your lifestyle. Is your idea of dining out a village pizzeria with a wood-fired oven or a fancy fish restaurant in Pescara? Are you happy with local wine by the liter, or can’t you imagine life without imported beer? Do you plan to have weekends away in Rome? But to give you an idea, the Abruzzo Monthly Budget includes some basic costs of living.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Abruzzo, Italy

Expense Monthly Cost Notes

Rent €674
Gas €25
Electricity €102
Water €25
Telephone €17
Internet €30
Cable TV €33
Groceries €375
Entertainment €257

Total €1,538

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

https://www.liveandinvestoverseas.com/co...y/abruzzo/


Quote:Property Prices

Abruzzo is one of the more affordable regions in Italy to buy property. The average price for a house is just US$75,000 and for an apartment, US$108,984. (Apartments in Abruzzo are slightly more expensive because they are more recently built and tend to be in the best locations). There is a move afoot to boost Abruzzo’s popularity, but at the moment prices are a bargain.

https://www.liveandinvestoverseas.com/co...-in-italy/
Europe is full of lovely little villages surrounded by beautiful nature.

The problem is that many (all?) of them are slowly being abandoned. The young leave and the old die. Just Google "dying villages".

I myself am from one of these villages and would likely never have left, if there would be something like a future.

My point is this: go as long as they exist. In 20 years from now, many will be gone.
[Image: med_Casa__Mirador_1_30.jpg]

Formentera island in Spain.

It's a quiet island and if you want more animation you can go to Ibiza for a day.

[Image: th?id=OIP.YeWZyeReS327SQHAlwbi7gHaGH&pid=Api]

Buying a house in Formentera is probably super expensive.
Posting to refresh my memory, & maybe inspire some of you guys.

Costa Brava, Spain:- In short, you have warm sea to swim in & a myriad of villages and small towns to choose from, all of which you can easily leave and get to Girona or Barcelona from. My favourites aren't the usual ones listed on travel blogs like Begur or Cadaques - they're just void of my type of vibe. I like Tossa de Mar, which is like a Game of Thrones location.

Important to note, that the Costa Brava villages aren't far at all from Catalonia countryside - which is like being in the South of France, with not even a 10th of the tourists. You can take your fly woman for a walk among sunflowers, and 20 minutes later, jump into the Med sea, swim into a cave with a hidden beach inside, and have her like a Dothraki. (If you want more of this, minus the countryside, look into any villages in Sardinia by the coast; best place for it, unless you want to go rogue and deep into rural Indonesia / Raja Ampat.)

If I was in a LTR and wanted to stay put somewhere for half a year, *sometimes* I'd pick a village or small town in Turkey with turquoise sea, a back drop of greenery and turtles. With their beaches, what's different between that and the Bahamas? Better architecture + food, too.
Oludeniz is the standard example of that type of place, bar the fact it's a resort village. There's plenty of similar places near if you search online. The Fethiye district has some small areas - smaller than villages - with a house or 2. The Antalya province has Cirali.

Most of these places in Turkey have small formations of land nearby in their water which some would call 'islands', and you can drop off at one of these for some privacy; they're just kind of barren and grassy, but they're there and make outdoor sex viable.
(06-23-2018 06:12 PM)H1N1 Wrote: [ -> ]I think the gmanifesto has a strict policy of not talking about villages by the sea, as they fill up with 'weesh dudes'.

That said, here is a place from my childhood. I remember sailing up the river from the sea with my family. I had the happiest childhood holiday of my life there. I was 11, a year or two before it first started to be a drag to have my parents as my sole company for a whole week. It is one of the places that has really stuck with me over the years.

It is in Devon, one of the most beautiful counties in England, on the South Coast.

It is an affluent place, the average house price is probably pushing a million dollars - it's about £600k I believe. Consequently, there is a lot of very fine pussy there throughout the year.

The town itself is busy, but five minutes in any direction takes you into some of the loveliest and most unspoilt English countryside.

There are a lot of excellent restaurants, but even better it is possible to buy fresh fish from the local fishermen each night, and pick wild samphire. Incredibly fresh fish, with fresh samphire, and a knob of butter, is one of the simplest and most delicious meals you could ask for.

There is a lifeboat station. The RNLI is a charity that runs the lifeboats, and each station is staffed by local volunteers and they are very brave men. I grew up on the water and am a fairly competent sailor. I'm proud of our maritime history, and being a lifeboat volunteer is something I've always felt I might do once I was older and my energies were not overwhelmingly focused on earning money.

It being England, one can source the food and wine one wants easily, one speaks the language, and a place like this could very easily become home. I would keep a boat, and have a house on the water.

It is also only a couple of hours from London, so one could easily maintain a flat in the city too.

Here is a picture or two:

[Image: 0A773AA5000005DC-0-image-a-31_1432510398683.jpg]

[Image: salcombe-devon-picture-id506781194]

You know, if you ever want somewhere where the homes are less than half the price, but the opposite end of the UK, look at Oban in Scotland. Fun for the women in Glasgow/Edinburgh (vastly underrated), the West Coast of Scotland has some of the best wildlife + scenery on earth, and Oban itself is the biggest town on the west coast for something like 300 miles, meaning it has...certain advantages when it comes to the mindset of people passing through.
Some pics I took the other day in my village by the sea...

I only was there for a day, but Cascais, Portugal was really awesome. Nice weather when I went, pretty upscale. They had a nice town center and it was still pretty close to Lisbon.

http://www.cascais-portugal.com/Guides/c...eeing.html
I like this country island in Estonia called Saaremaa. There is a country hamlet called Panga and they have a cliff there on the sea. There is land for sale, right on the coast. I would like to somehow find a way to buy that piece of land I saw for sale. Build a medium sized stone cabin/ cottage and walk across the road to the sea and watch the sun go down every day. This place is in the middle of no where. I have met some of the women from that island. I really would have liked to have met a girl from there, got her pregnant. Raised my children and moved there and died. Bury me along that sea shore somewhere and I would have lived a happy life.
(07-03-2018 06:23 AM)montaigne Wrote: [ -> ]You know, if you ever want somewhere where the homes are less than half the price, but the opposite end of the UK, look at Oban in Scotland. Fun for the women in Glasgow/Edinburgh (vastly underrated), the West Coast of Scotland has some of the best wildlife + scenery on earth, and Oban itself is the biggest town on the west coast for something like 300 miles, meaning it has...certain advantages when it comes to the mindset of people passing through.

I'm actually very familiar with the West Coast of Scotland, and have spent a good deal of time there. For a long while it was a dream of mine to have a remote place on a loch there, or perhaps on Skye or another of the islands off Malaig. That dream has vanished for a number of reasons, some practical, some due to changes in myself. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, for the 3 weeks a year it sees sunshine. The rest of the time, it is rather dour. These days I find myself wanting something with a little more human hum around. As soon as you cross the border into Scotland, every mile you travel takes you a mile away from civilisation. I'm very fond of civilisation.
Finding that there's a few towns & villages only an hour's commute from London. Incredible to go from pale and humble seaside & sand, to Indian-English & African-English women wearing Chanel or cute dresses and sucking the soul out of your eyes. I think for anyone who wants to get work or networking done in London, anywhere on the East & South coast should be considered as a base, and even places in the Surrey hills with all their lakes & medieval villages. I finally understand where all the rich footballers buy their property & why.
(07-04-2018 02:12 AM)H1N1 Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-03-2018 06:23 AM)montaigne Wrote: [ -> ]You know, if you ever want somewhere where the homes are less than half the price, but the opposite end of the UK, look at Oban in Scotland. Fun for the women in Glasgow/Edinburgh (vastly underrated), the West Coast of Scotland has some of the best wildlife + scenery on earth, and Oban itself is the biggest town on the west coast for something like 300 miles, meaning it has...certain advantages when it comes to the mindset of people passing through.

I'm actually very familiar with the West Coast of Scotland, and have spent a good deal of time there. For a long while it was a dream of mine to have a remote place on a loch there, or perhaps on Skye or another of the islands off Malaig. That dream has vanished for a number of reasons, some practical, some due to changes in myself. Scotland is one of the most beautiful places on earth, for the 3 weeks a year it sees sunshine. The rest of the time, it is rather dour. These days I find myself wanting something with a little more human hum around. As soon as you cross the border into Scotland, every mile you travel takes you a mile away from civilisation. I'm very fond of civilisation.

It has been sunny, warm and dry here for the past 4 months. I've not worn a jacket since March. The east coast gets as much sun as Paris and places just east of Edinburgh such as Dunbar are drier than most major places in Europe including Barcelona and Nice.

If having two very different major cities 48 minutes train journey away / 70 minute drive (40 minutes after High-speed rail from this winter) from each other with a population of over 2.5 million combined is 'dour' and 'uncivilised' I will take it. Girls from all over the world come to Edinburgh now. Along with the scenery and countryside that is never ending as soon as you drive out of either city.
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