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RE: Bone Broth - Alpha Mind - 01-28-2015 06:26 AM

Just finished my 1st batch tonight.

Got ~5lbs of "beef leg" bones from the Asian market here in Austin. Was $4 or so. Not labeled organic/grass fed, but I didn't want to go to Whole Foods on a Saturday. Living in Austin, the hipster demand for bones from the good butchers is high as well.

Threw them in the crock pot with 4 tablespoons of ACV. Turned it on for 10 hours and slept. Woke up, turned it on for 14 more, let it cool a bit, strained, and froze in plastic containers.

Didn't add any vegetables, salt, pepper, garlic. Nada. Taste was fine, albeit bland. I'm looking forward to cooking with it in the slow cooker, adding to rice, etc.

Going to drink 2 coffee mugs worth at least per day and will report back after a week.

Question...does the broth lose health benefits if you use it for cooking recipes after the broth is made (something on high in the slow cooker, for example)?


RE: Bone Broth - JoyStick - 01-30-2015 01:41 PM

Is adding a splash of ACV in the broth for health benefits or does it improve the taste?


RE: Bone Broth - 007 - 02-02-2015 02:19 PM

The avc helps the minerals to leach out of the bones. Let the bones it in the cold water / avc mix for a hour before boiling the broth. 1-2tbs is enough.

(01-30-2015 01:41 PM)JoyStick Wrote:  Is adding a splash of ACV in the broth for health benefits or does it improve the taste?



RE: Bone Broth - Brodiaga - 02-02-2015 10:16 PM

I didn't have apple cider vinegar, so I added a couple of splashes of regular vinegar. I also cooked meat with bones and wanted to eat it later with the broth and rice, but after I cooked it for about 12 hours the meat became very tough and chewy, like all the fat was sucked out of it. I think it happened because of the vinegar.


RE: Bone Broth - germanico - 02-03-2015 02:10 AM

(01-30-2015 01:41 PM)JoyStick Wrote:  Is adding a splash of ACV in the broth for health benefits or does it improve the taste?

I add a dash of both vinegar and olive oil to any broth I make right before serving. Makes everything delicious.


RE: Bone Broth - Sanji - 02-11-2015 03:05 PM

This sounds very interesting.


RE: Bone Broth - komatiite - 02-24-2015 12:38 AM

I always make stocks with roasted beef bones slathered in tomato paste, then simmer with onion, carrot, celery and then herbs in a cheesecloth (parsley, bay leaves & thyme) for 24 hours. However, I never really need a big ass container of stock when I cook other than when I reduce a ton for an amateur-hour demi glacé or a big pot of stew or chili. Most of the time, I like to just use a little bit of stock for a pan jus with my steak or pork, or for stuff like a little flavour boost to rice. I found a handy trick is to do this:

[Image: 44iV8lx.jpg]

You can just grab a few cubes whenever necessary without having to thaw out a big container. I found it makes my life easier in the kitchen... Sort of like a natural bouillon cube without a gazillion grams of sodium!


RE: Bone Broth - heavy - 02-24-2015 08:43 AM

(02-02-2015 10:16 PM)Brodiaga Wrote:  I didn't have apple cider vinegar, so I added a couple of splashes of regular vinegar. I also cooked meat with bones and wanted to eat it later with the broth and rice, but after I cooked it for about 12 hours the meat became very tough and chewy, like all the fat was sucked out of it. I think it happened because of the vinegar.

It's not tough because of the vinegar. It first depends on the cut of meat. Second how you cooked it. On high for 12 hours might make it chewy.


RE: Bone Broth - Harvey Specter - 02-24-2015 11:11 AM

(02-02-2015 10:16 PM)Brodiaga Wrote:  I didn't have apple cider vinegar, so I added a couple of splashes of regular vinegar. I also cooked meat with bones and wanted to eat it later with the broth and rice, but after I cooked it for about 12 hours the meat became very tough and chewy, like all the fat was sucked out of it. I think it happened because of the vinegar.

It happened because you overcooked the meat. You should remove the meat after 45 minutes or so, or it will be inedible as you experienced. I don't like boiled meat anyways, so I would suggest cooking the chicken a different method and then removing the meat before making the stock, but that is just my opinion.


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 02-26-2015 12:13 AM

Just bought this. Lowest price on record so far. It is a big pressure cooker. I figure I can make a bunch of broth at one time. A bit heavy though 20 lbs.

http://www.amazon.com/All-American-921-2-Quart-Pressure/dp/B00004S88Z


RE: Bone Broth - Bear Hands - 02-26-2015 03:55 AM

I never expected to see this being touted for health reasons. I've been making my own stock for years just because it tastes better than anything you can buy and I'm a nut for sauces, stews, and soups.

I never boil my stock after I read somewhere the places where everything inside the bone would leech out will constrict at higher heat, so I cook mine on medium-low heat to get a bare simmer for a couple hours. My results have been much better since I adopted that technique. The carcasses from 2 roasted chickens with 4 carrots, 4 ribs of celery, 2 onions, 6 cloves of garlic, about 2 Tbsp of black peppercorns, and 3 bay leaves yielded about 3 quarts of stock. The stock was so thick after cooling in the fridge that it held the shape of the containers it was in after I poured it into a pot of beans.

Bay leaves are awesome for stock. Sometimes I'll add star anise, toasted carraway seeds, and toasted cumin seeds for beef stock.


RE: Bone Broth - GlockTrigga - 03-02-2015 01:09 PM

(02-26-2015 03:55 AM)Bear Hands Wrote:  I never expected to see this being touted for health reasons.

Random fact but rates of osteoporosis are higher in Chinese cities vs. in the countryside where bone broth is consumed more.


RE: Bone Broth - eestreet - 03-03-2015 01:30 PM

Roasted my first duck a few weeks ago with clementine and Chinese five spice. Tasted amazing but the duck was so fatty it didn't yield as much meat as I hoped for. Rather than waste the carcass I decided to make stock with it.

Medium-low simmer with onion, carrot, celery, leek, garlic, parsley, bay leaves, and thyme for 8 hours yielded the best stock I've ever tasted. Used it in a soup and a savory bread pudding making such a difference!

I am now going to roast foul more often to keep my own stock on hand at all times. Will have to try bone broth too.

I also skimmed the fat after it cooled and will be using in the future in place of lesser store-bought fats.


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-03-2015 02:33 PM

(03-02-2015 01:09 PM)GlockTrigga Wrote:  
(02-26-2015 03:55 AM)Bear Hands Wrote:  I never expected to see this being touted for health reasons.

Random fact but rates of osteoporosis are higher in Chinese cities vs. in the countryside where bone broth is consumed more.

Why would that be? Any insights would be appreciated.


RE: Bone Broth - Harvey Specter - 03-03-2015 03:07 PM

(03-03-2015 02:33 PM)samsamsam Wrote:  
(03-02-2015 01:09 PM)GlockTrigga Wrote:  
(02-26-2015 03:55 AM)Bear Hands Wrote:  I never expected to see this being touted for health reasons.

Random fact but rates of osteoporosis are higher in Chinese cities vs. in the countryside where bone broth is consumed more.

Why would that be? Any insights would be appreciated.

I think he is saying that bone broth is beneficial for prevention of osteoporosis. With bone broth you are leeching all of the vitamins and minerals out of bones, so it seems to make sense that it would prevent a disease that weakens your bones due to a lack of necessary vitamins and minerals.

On a different note does anyone ever boil the broth into bouillon? Like shown in this recipe.

http://nourishedkitchen.com/homemade-bouillon-portable-soup/


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-03-2015 03:11 PM

^^ Thanks, I'm a moron lol. Read it too fast. I was just thinking to myself "WTF, my pressure cooker just arrived and I am reading it isn't good for me!" Laugh


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-08-2015 04:17 PM

I gave it a shot.

I realized the preesure cooker I got was way too huge (20 lbs) and old school, with real gauges and stuff. I quickly got the one Veloce recommended.

I tossed some beef bones, carrots, onions, celery, acv and salt.

I cooled it down quickly in some cold water and ice bath. And stuck it in the fridge.

I tasted it, was so so. Probably needed more salt and some other items.

Also, I noticed a layer of oil that kept getting into my tasting spoon.

I am hoping that once it cools solid, I can scrape the top layer and then really see how it tastes.

I am looking forward to drinking this miracle drug.

Also, I heard that with bigger bones you can reuse them until they start to crumble. So I am saving the bones.


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-09-2015 02:15 PM

Small update. The fat did solidify and I was planning on scraping it off like I have seen in videos. But to my surprise it hardened and looked like a giant white chocolate wafer.

The broth was definitely like jello but still had a bland flavor. I guess I might try adding some salt or garlic pepper or something. Or maybe try to mix it into my salad.

I KNOW - My oven needs some cleaning. Sad
[Image: photo_1_5.jpg]
[Image: photo_2_5.jpg]


RE: Bone Broth - komatiite - 03-09-2015 02:49 PM

Sams post reminded me- what do you guys do with the fat you skim off? I keep reading online to save it, but doesn't the fat have a low smoke point? How do you utilize it in the kitchen?


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-09-2015 02:50 PM

(03-09-2015 02:49 PM)komatiite Wrote:  Sams post reminded me- what do you guys do with the fat you skim off? I keep reading online to save it, but doesn't the fat have a low smoke point? How do you utilize it in the kitchen?

I froze mine for now until I figured if there was a good use for it.Good question.


RE: Bone Broth - komatiite - 03-09-2015 03:02 PM

Sam if you are not happy with the flavor may I suggest reducing the fuck out of it and use it for a pan sauce?




Add some herbs to your sauce like this lady does, then pour over steaks. I use mine as a finishing sauce when I make steaks, just a quick deglaze in the pan with red wine and add some brown sauce.


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-09-2015 03:17 PM

I just think I need to use some more items next time, and for this time I will add some stuff and just eat it. As long as I am getting real benefits, I'll just deal with it.

I wonder what should have been added to get some flavor in there. I'll have to google some more.


RE: Bone Broth - Brodiaga - 03-09-2015 09:32 PM

(02-24-2015 08:43 AM)heavy Wrote:  
(02-02-2015 10:16 PM)Brodiaga Wrote:  I didn't have apple cider vinegar, so I added a couple of splashes of regular vinegar. I also cooked meat with bones and wanted to eat it later with the broth and rice, but after I cooked it for about 12 hours the meat became very tough and chewy, like all the fat was sucked out of it. I think it happened because of the vinegar.

It's not tough because of the vinegar. It first depends on the cut of meat. Second how you cooked it. On high for 12 hours might make it chewy.

I changed my method this time. Cooked the beef for about 5 hours (high temp, slow cooker) until it came off the bones easily, then took out the meat, left the bones and onion, switched the slow cooker to low temp and kept it running overnight.

The meat seems fine. The broth looks ok but kind of thick, haven't tried it yet.


RE: Bone Broth - Bear Hands - 03-11-2015 09:39 AM

(03-09-2015 02:49 PM)komatiite Wrote:  Sams post reminded me- what do you guys do with the fat you skim off? I keep reading online to save it, but doesn't the fat have a low smoke point? How do you utilize it in the kitchen?

At least with poultry fat, that stuff is called schmaltz and you can use it a lot like you would use butter. Some people actually spread that stuff on bread. It's used for making matzo balls, and foods like potatoes and brussels sprouts taste great roasted in it.

Fat from beef is probably similarly usable if you like the taste. If it's not flavorful enough on its own, cook some onions and garlic in it, strain it, and let it re-solidify.

(03-09-2015 03:17 PM)samsamsam Wrote:  I just think I need to use some more items next time, and for this time I will add some stuff and just eat it. As long as I am getting real benefits, I'll just deal with it.

I wonder what should have been added to get some flavor in there. I'll have to google some more.

Beef is just hard to flavor. Use 2 to 3 time as much stuff to flavor it as you did before, and consider some coarsely crushed spices like black peppercorns, cumin seeds, or all spice berries.


RE: Bone Broth - samsamsam - 03-11-2015 01:28 PM

Article on Kobe Bryant and Bone broth.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/01/22/how-bone-broth-became-kobe-bryants-secret-stone-age-weapon/

Quote:There is an expression, long overheard in Latin American kitchens, that sums up the mystical power of a good broth.

“Good broth resurrects the dead,” the saying goes.

The word “dead” also pretty much sums up what many people thought Kobe Bryant’s career was after the aging Los Angeles Lakers star suffered a ruptured Achilles tendon — a potentially career-ending injury for a player his age — and then fractured a knee during an eight-month stretch in 2013. And yet, this season, at the age of 36, Bryant not only returned, he thrived (at least before injuring his shoulder Wednesday), averaging 22.3 points per game (ninth best in the NBA) on a pair of legs that have logged more than 46,000 minutes on NBA hardwood.

An article on the Lakers diet - they push butter, bacon and bone broth.
http://grantland.com/the-triangle/butter-bacon-and-bone-broth-a-week-on-the-lakers-diet/
Quote:The nutrition program, designed by Dr. Cate Shanahan and implemented by Lakers strength and conditioning coach “Grass-fed” Tim DiFrancesco, places a heavy emphasis on good fats because, according to the two, it’s the most efficient source of energy for the body. From an interview with DiFrancesco last July: “Contrary to what people might think, we actually want our players to eat as much grass fed butter and bacon as we can get into them.”

Another pillar in the Lakers’ diet is bone broth (marrow bones and bones from cartilage-rich areas like joints and knuckles simmered in water with aromatics for 12-plus hours), which helps fortify the tendons and ligaments. It’s Kobe-approved.

A question for the forum - nothing says I can't make bone broth with bones andbacon to give it some flavor right? That was how I stumbled across these articles, I was thinking of adding baconEvil