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RE: Bone Broth - Belgrano - 01-23-2016 08:25 PM

Maybe we have a transatlantic misunderstanding here, but isn't this just soup?


RE: Bone Broth - realologist - 01-24-2016 07:48 AM

(01-23-2016 08:25 PM)Celtic_Austrian Wrote:  Maybe we have a transatlantic misunderstanding here, but isn't this just soup?

Yes, but in America almost no one knows does or even knows how to make their own broth and their own soup. Most Americans think Campbell's canned processed garbage is good soup because it says hearty on the label. Most have never actually even tried home made soup and broth. Luckily imy parents, grandparents and other relatives have done it since forever. That's unusual here though.


RE: Bone Broth - MiscBrah - 01-30-2016 02:50 PM

Just threw 2.5 pounds of beef bones into the crockpot with some ACV and salt

Didn't add any seasoning or vegetables yet. I'm going to do that in the final 2 hours of slow cooking.

Ill probably throw in a beef cube or two as well.

I'm about 12-16 hours out. Will report back.

For next time, should I let the bones sit in the water/ACV mix for awhile before I get it going? Would that help draw out nutrients better?


RE: Bone Broth - h3ltrsk3ltr - 01-30-2016 05:05 PM

(01-30-2016 02:50 PM)MiscBrah Wrote:  Just threw 2.5 pounds of beef bones into the crockpot with some ACV and salt

Didn't add any seasoning or vegetables yet. I'm going to do that in the final 2 hours of slow cooking.

Ill probably throw in a beef cube or two as well.

I'm about 12-16 hours out. Will report back.

For next time, should I let the bones sit in the water/ACV mix for awhile before I get it going? Would that help draw out nutrients better?

Did you just take the bones out of the package and throw them in?

I hear if you roast them in the oven for a few minutes beforehand it gives a darker broth.

It may have already been mentioned here but obviously grass fed cows will give off a better quality fat.

And 2.5 lbs for one pot? Should be some potent shit!

Edit: Looks like that's maybe not such a crazy amount of bones, but I think beef broth might require less boneage...not sure.

Either way on the whole grass-fed thing, if it's not grass fed I'd wait til the fat rises to the top when it cools, at which time, toss it. Otherwise, if it's some organic, grass fed stuff do what my mother does: Leave it in or use it to cook something else.


RE: Bone Broth - MiscBrah - 01-30-2016 05:32 PM

^^Yeah I got them from my butcher so I believe they are pretty high quality. They still had a decent amount of meat on them too.

It was really simple. Took about 5 minutes to get it going. I did this once before a couple months ago and got a lot of broth out of the 2.5 pounds. I should have enough to last at least 2-3 weeks.


RE: Bone Broth - h3ltrsk3ltr - 01-30-2016 06:13 PM

I'm going to get on this myself. Great bump. I'm also going to look into growing my own wheat grass. I've heard that it has similar properties.


RE: Bone Broth - Lagavulin - 01-03-2017 05:18 PM

Does anybody know if the nutritional value of bone broth would be at all compromised by microwaving?

I'd like to make some and add it when preparing chilli's and stew's, which I then freeze and microwave as needed.


RE: Bone Broth - komatiite - 01-03-2017 08:04 PM

(01-03-2017 05:18 PM)Lagavulin Wrote:  Does anybody know if the nutritional value of bone broth would be at all compromised by microwaving?

I'd like to make some and add it when preparing chilli's and stew's, which I then freeze and microwave as needed.

I doubt it's a big deal. What I do is make a batch of stock in my pressure cooker, sieve out the solids, strain finely into another pot, let sit outside overnight (winter), remove solid fat in the morning then pour into either Yogurt containers or Ice Cube Trays. Then freeze in my chest freezer.

I never drink the broth because I always use herbs and mirepoix in mine, it's solely for cooking. Shits too good in recipes to waste on mugs of stock -- I just supplement with Great Lakes Collagen as per Isaac Jordans suggestion in the Workout Injury Thread when I drink collagen.

Therefore when I add my stock to recipes I just either thaw quickly in the microwave for one minute so it slides out of the container or crack out a stock ice cube direct into the pot of chili or stew after browning my meat and onion/mushrooms/leeks/carrots/peppers etc. The amount in a regular size Greek yogurt container is a perfect amount for a base of deglazing fluid.

The cubes are good too directly frozen in a pan sauce. Fry a steak in Rice Bran oil based on Veloces recipe, pour out excess oil, fry shallots/mushrooms in dirty pan, add splash of water to deglaze and a few stock cubes. Reduce down, by the time the cubes melt it will be a perfect thickness as the initial splash of water will have evaporated.

Not a big need to thaw fully in the microwave, I mainly avoid it because i don't want to leech out xenestrogens from the plastic container as I nuke it. I doubt it has any impact on the nutritional value of the stock as it's mainly minerals and collagen which both hold up well to heat. Like I said I just nuke them for a short time to melt it just enough to slide out of the container but that can be avoided if you thaw overnight the day before cooking your big dish.

Edit, I reread your post and it seems like you are referencing the leftovers stew or chili. Just freeze in glass containers if you reheat in the microwave or just nuke for a minute to get it out of plastic then pour your leftovers into a pot on the stove as a semi-frozen block.


RE: Bone Broth - Lagavulin - 01-04-2017 09:30 AM

Good post komatiite - thanks.


RE: Bone Broth - Kinko - 01-04-2017 09:03 PM

MidnightSpecial Wrote: "I don't like crock pot because its electric. I feel like the electrical current goes through your food, lol, some health nut milf told me that shit one day and now I got a weird vibe about it."

Something along those same lines. I stopped making bone broth. There are a few articles that suggest long cook times of the bones can be unhealthy to consume.

I used to brew bone broth continuously for days, adding more water and extra bone each day. I think the long cooking times are not so healthy for some reason. Can not say why exactly.

What I do now is make Beef Broth which is cooking beef in water for only 10-20 minutes then mashing the beef and it makes a highly delicious beefy water broth.

As others mentioned you can also make fish bone broth in just 1-2 hours and that requires less cooking time.


RE: Bone Broth - komatiite - 01-04-2017 10:45 PM

Kinko your 20 minute Beef broth offers none of the typical benefits of the classic bone broth or stock because you don't give it enough time to break down collagen or leach out minerals.

here is a pretty fascinating experiment on stock making where he uses the classic stovetop, electric slow cooker and a pressure cooker to compare:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/01/ask-the-food-lab-can-i-make-stock-in-a-pressure-cooker-slow-cooker.html

In only one hour you can make a great stock with the flavor and body of a 24+ hour stovetop stock using a pressure cooker if the long times are an issue for you.


RE: Bone Broth - Wreckingball - 01-05-2017 11:35 AM

I read the whole thread am I'm interested in doing this stuff. Not for drinking from the cup, but more to use in cooking. I still have some questions that I did not fully understand.

The process seems to be quite simple:
1)I put the bones (thinking about 1kg ~2.2lbs of pork feet) with cold water and 2~4 tablespoons of ACV.
2)Add veggies + water + spices
3)Turn crockpot (medium or high?) for a period of 12-48 hours
4)store it


Will the whole broth get the fat layer? Will it have a "watered" layer and the fat on top?
What to do with the fat?


RE: Bone Broth - Hypno - 01-05-2017 12:58 PM

some of you guys are making this harder than it is.

just get some bones and boil them. instant soup.

I'll get a rotisserie chicken at Costco or Whole Foods and eat the chicken. I then salvage the good meet. I put the rest in a pot with water and let it get to a raging boil for about 5 minutes and let it simmer for an hour. Its great soup, just strain the bones out. You can refil the pot and make another pot's worth of broth.

if you are making soup, add onion, celery, carrots, some of your leftover chicken meat. I also add shitake mushrooms and i chop some fresh parsley. i boil some noodles separately because you get a better texture to the noodle that way rather than just dumping it in the soup. This is a cheap, nutritious meal that is better than anything you'll get a 5-star restaurant.

The extra broth I pour into cupcake tins and freeze. Once frozen, i pop them into a ziploc bag. You can thaw the extra broth for more soup or for recipes.

[Image: kdgneepmic0m2k4tai7n.jpg]

I don't usually do beef or lamb because I buy it without bones but its the same process. Instead of noodles try barley. Also, beef and lamb are heartier flavors so you can add stronger flavored vegetables likes tomatoes, okra, lima beans, peas, carrots.

the leftover soup i put in a 2-Qt mason jar and refriderate.


RE: Bone Broth - Hypno - 01-05-2017 01:02 PM

as a clarification, generally you first create the broth by boiling the bones and skin vigourously.

you then strain out the inedible parts - bones, skin, etc. - to get the broth.

To the broth you add flavorings like salt, garlic, mushrooms, etc. Reason is that you can eat the whole mushroom in addition to the flavor that leaches from the mushroom. You don't have to strain the mushrooms out. So anything that is good to eat - onions, mushrooms, parsley, celery - add as part of the 2nd step. Also, some of those you don't want to overcook which is another reason to add them only at step 2.

One thing I also do is I use greens that otherwise go to waste. For example, celery. Most people will throw away the leafy part of the stalk, but this is excellent in soup.


RE: Bone Broth - Turnus - 01-05-2017 03:36 PM

Thanks for the tip Hypno. I get a Costco chicken about once a week and generally just eat the meat and through out the carcas. Had never even thought about boiling it. I'm going to try this with my next one!


RE: Bone Broth - SiverFox - 01-05-2017 06:00 PM

(01-05-2017 11:35 AM)Wreckingball Wrote:  I read the whole thread am I'm interested in doing this stuff. Not for drinking from the cup, but more to use in cooking. I still have some questions that I did not fully understand.

The process seems to be quite simple:
1)I put the bones (thinking about 1kg ~2.2lbs of pork feet) with cold water and 2~4 tablespoons of ACV.
2)Add veggies + water + spices
3)Turn crockpot (medium or high?) for a period of 12-48 hours
4)store it


Will the whole broth get the fat layer? Will it have a "watered" layer and the fat on top?
What to do with the fat?

I get a bag of cow leg bones from Whole Food, lately they have been having some meat on them. I salt and pepper, then bake for an hour at 350°, then put in slow cooker (w/liquid), fill with water and a cup of ACV, then slow cook for about a day and half on low. Remove bones and strain into two large containers and refrigerate. Overnight, the fat will settle on top and harden. I remove and put that down the drain. I put one cup in a coffee cup each morning, microwave for a minute and drink and let my dog lick the cup. It is delicious.

I'd be curious to hear what people do with the fat, and any good recipes for soup.


RE: Bone Broth - komatiite - 01-05-2017 08:16 PM

(01-05-2017 06:00 PM)SiverFox Wrote:  
(01-05-2017 11:35 AM)Wreckingball Wrote:  I read the whole thread am I'm interested in doing this stuff. Not for drinking from the cup, but more to use in cooking. I still have some questions that I did not fully understand.

The process seems to be quite simple:
1)I put the bones (thinking about 1kg ~2.2lbs of pork feet) with cold water and 2~4 tablespoons of ACV.
2)Add veggies + water + spices
3)Turn crockpot (medium or high?) for a period of 12-48 hours
4)store it


Will the whole broth get the fat layer? Will it have a "watered" layer and the fat on top?
What to do with the fat?

I get a bag of cow leg bones from Whole Food, lately they have been having some meat on them. I salt and pepper, then bake for an hour at 350°, then put in slow cooker (w/liquid), fill with water and a cup of ACV, then slow cook for about a day and half on low. Remove bones and strain into two large containers and refrigerate. Overnight, the fat will settle on top and harden. I remove and put that down the drain. I put one cup in a coffee cup each morning, microwave for a minute and drink and let my dog lick the cup. It is delicious.

I'd be curious to hear what people do with the fat, and any good recipes for soup.

The fat (for chicken stock at least) is called Schmaltz, it is good to fry potatoes with. It's popular in Jewish cooking I hear. Not sure about the beef stock fat though. Maybe try it in a potato fry for an experiment?

BTW, don't dump your fat down the drain, it will eventually clog your pipes. Throw it in the garbage. My mom made this mistake and passed it on to me.

When you roast your bones, spread on some tomato paste in the last 30 minutes -- it takes your stock to the next level!

With beef stock (or veal stock) I don't really use it for soup (I find chicken stock is a smoother base for soup)..., I like it better as a braising liquid for tough cuts of meat like brisket, chuck roast or lamb shanks. Brown your meat, add mirepoix or whatever veg you like, then add the stock. Toss in fresh rosemary -- cook low and slow for three plus hours. It's also a nice way to enhance chili. I tried making French onion soup with beef stock and that was pretty good, but sort of impractical for a dude who just wants big batches of quick hearty meals. French onion soup is more of an appetizer than a meal.


RE: Bone Broth - Wreckingball - 01-06-2017 06:45 AM

Thank you for the info!

From wikipedia:
"Schmaltz (also spelled schmalz or shmalz) is rendered (clarified) chicken or goose fat used for frying or as a spread on bread in Central European cuisine, and in the United States, particularly identified with Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine. Rendered waterfowl fat is also used in the cuisine of Southwestern France. As an effect of cross-cultural influences of the Jewish Ashkenazi, Polish, and Ukrainian cuisine, it is also popular in Poland and Ukraine, where rendered fats (including lard) are called smalec, with schmaltz derived from geese being popular as gęsi smalec.
The English term "schmaltz" is derived from Yiddish, and is cognate with the German term Schmalz, meaning "rendered animal fat", regardless of source: both tallow and lard are considered forms of Schmalz in German, as is clarified butter. English usage tends to follow Yiddish, where it means poultry fat.[1][2][3]"

The other day I got a whole duck (feathers and everything) and I had to remove the feathers, and cut it to make magret.
I preserved most of the fat and used it while cooking the duck breast. THen added some of the fat to the"air fryer" potatoes I was doing (basically it fries in air with just a spoon of olive oil).
I shit you not, I ate 8 medium potatoes. They were so fucking tasty!


RE: Bone Broth - Snowplow - 01-06-2017 07:41 AM

(01-30-2016 02:50 PM)MiscBrah Wrote:  Just threw 2.5 pounds of beef bones into the crockpot with some ACV and salt

Didn't add any seasoning or vegetables yet. I'm going to do that in the final 2 hours of slow cooking.

Ill probably throw in a beef cube or two as well.

I'm about 12-16 hours out. Will report back.

For next time, should I let the bones sit in the water/ACV mix for awhile before I get it going? Would that help draw out nutrients better?

Why throw in a beef cube?

Like a bullion cube or some cubes of meat?


RE: Bone Broth - Hypno - 01-13-2017 01:49 PM

avoid those bullion cubes at all costs. I have never found any that did not have MSG. MSG is a neourotoxin and is the first thing you should eliminate from your diet.


RE: Bone Broth - roid - 01-16-2017 01:39 AM

I don't know whether this has been covered before on this thread, but bone broth is full of organic sulfur (one of the essential minerals that are lacking in human bodies nowadays).


RE: Bone Broth - Leads - 01-17-2017 05:53 AM

wow, great to hear about Bone Broth. I aim to find a restaurant that makes it. Currently stoked on my daily Chaga Mushroom powder in my coffee. Improved eyesight, massive mood change and sustained power all day


RE: Bone Broth - Hypno - 01-17-2017 06:55 AM

(01-23-2016 08:25 PM)Belgrano Wrote:  Maybe we have a transatlantic misunderstanding here, but isn't this just soup?

yes, but made the traditional way from the bones not from processed soup envelope with chemicals and preservatives etc. Its actually rare in the U.S. You can get soup in some restaurants in the U.S. but it is very rare to find real soup.


RE: Bone Broth - CaptainChardonnay - 01-17-2017 11:50 AM

Just made some beef bone broth then used it to try to make a stew in my crock pot however its a lot more runny then i would like, anyone have tips on how i could make it thicker? I trie using flour but that didn't work.


RE: Bone Broth - Ringo - 01-17-2017 12:30 PM

(01-17-2017 11:50 AM)CaptainChardonnay Wrote:  Just made some beef bone broth then used it to try to make a stew in my crock pot however its a lot more runny then i would like, anyone have tips on how i could make it thicker? I trie using flour but that didn't work.

Have you tried reducing, that is simmering it uncovered, on the stovetop?

This allows the water to evaporate, which makes for a thicker and more pronounced stew.