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Surfing - FretDancer - 12-07-2010 04:14 PM

How many people here surf? I've never surfing in my life but recently I've been having this urge to learn and give it a try. I wanna incorporate surfing into my lifestyle. I'm not currently planning on taking it to a competitive level, but who knows maybe in the future I might.

Right now I just want to learn, and feel how it's like.

I'd like to hear responses from people who surf and just love it. Also I'd like recomendations on places near Central America where I can begin to learn.


RE: Surfing - Biz - 12-07-2010 04:28 PM

I've wanted to learn all my life, I plan on it someday when I am 'location independant' or just away somewhere for a decent amount of time.


RE: Surfing - BazzookaBalls - 12-07-2010 10:59 PM

Start with a long board at first paddling and keeping your balance is going to be the toughest, but just like anything else once you get it, it becomes fun. When buying a board check craigslist since your new at it you won't need a new board, just something to get your feet wet.


RE: Surfing - Kona - 12-08-2010 05:24 AM

I do it everyday and love it. I made a serious decision to make not only surfing, but the ocean in general my lifestyle a few years ago, and I've stuck with it. I feel great.

The most important thing about surfing isn't your strength or your balance. It's your confidence. You gotta have it to be good, but you gotta be good to have it.

Aloha!


RE: Surfing - BazzookaBalls - 12-08-2010 06:24 AM

[php]
(12-08-2010 05:24 AM)Kona Wrote:  The most important thing about surfing isn't your strength or your balance. It's your confidence. You gotta have it to be good, but you gotta be good to have it.

Aloha!
Dropping knowledge!! Just like game.


RE: Surfing - Aliblahba - 12-08-2010 09:43 AM

My uncle taught me to surf probably 10 yrs ago. I started out w/ a local shaped longboard that almost impossible to learn on. After a month or so I was standing up. Finally I broke down and bought a Stewart hydro hull 9'2". MUCH easier to ride. Almost drown once in some hurricane surf in N.C. I agree w/ Kona, and surfing can quickly become a lifestyle. Nothing is more relaxing than sitting on your board after work, by yourself, whether catching waves or not. Very spiritual and tranquil. Surfing is an easy way to pickup tourist chicks. You become the alpha dog with a board (and some skill).


RE: Surfing - Invictus - 12-08-2010 11:53 AM

How long and how much instruction would it take to get "decent", assuming one is average learner?

I'm headed to Central America, and want to dedicate some time to getting the surfing part down. No ambitions towards becoming very good, but decent mastery of the board and the wave would be outstanding progress. Never tried surfing before.

2 weeks practice every day good enough? Or a month?


RE: Surfing - InternationalSwagger - 12-08-2010 02:08 PM

I went surfing once in Waikiki at one of those surf schools and picked it up fairly well for a 1st timer (I dive and I'm a good swimmer). It was extremely fun and challenging and I got some awesome photos out of it. If I lived closer to a beach I could definitely see myself getting into that lifestyle. Surfing is a great way to pick up women and to stay in shape, you should of seen the amount of CREAM I got from posting pictures of me surfing on my page. Especially with cultures that arent into it (Black American Culture) chicks really digged it and see me as different from the rest so It's cool to stand out from the pack.


RE: Surfing - kerouac - 12-08-2010 02:15 PM

I used to live walking distance to the beach and since I was in such a beautiful spot I decided to learn how to surf. It was a great experience, and I loved getting in the water, but I hurt my knee playing soccer one day so I had to put it off and haven't gone back in the water since. Like everyone said, the best thing about surfing (for me) was getting in the water. It's a great way to start the day, and there's nothing more refreshing.

As for a learning curve, I've only longboarded and that was pretty easy. I tried getting on my friends shortboard but it's way more difficult. I don't imagine you could learn how to surf on a short board in 2 weeks and be "good enough". I think if you're lucky you'll be able to catch a few waves, but it's not as simple as the longboard. If you want street cred with other surfers (and you're young) you should learn how to ride on a shortboard. I think most, if not all, surfers consider long boarding something for the grandpas.


RE: Surfing - K-man - 12-08-2010 03:04 PM

I only windsurf, because there are no big waves for Hawaiian style surfing where I live now (Bulgaria - Black Sea).
Learning is not that hard if you start on a large board, after several lessons you are going some way into the sea and back. However, it is hard to learn the tricks you see the pros doing. I've been surfing for fun and relaxation for 2 summers now but still can't do the backflips and jybes and other such stuff which seems to be attractive to girls. Like I said, I do it for fun instead, and I've met many cool guys at the surf school, but not too many girls. There were some who were mainly girlfriends of other surfer dudes. No groupies, so to say.


RE: Surfing - thegmanifesto - 12-08-2010 06:21 PM

I have been surfing almost all my life.

"I'd like to hear responses from people who surf and just love it. Also I'd like recomendations on places near Central America where I can begin to learn."

Costa Rica is a great place to learn. Less crowded, warm water, plenty of beachbreaks. What more could you want?

"How long and how much instruction would it take to get "decent", assuming one is average learner?"

Almost everyone that can actually surf, has never taken "lessons". I am sure Kona would agree with this.

You just have to go do it. The problem is, if you didn't start at a young age, you will, generally speaking be handicapped.

The other issue with learning to surf is it takes a long time. This is not all due to the fact that surfing is difficult (even though it is). Much of it is due to ocean conditions.

Think of it like this: if you want to get good at basketball, you can go out there everyday and the rim and the hoop are always there.

Surfing is different due to ocean conditions. It might be flat. It might be blown out. There might have been rain and you will get hepatitis. It might be 10 foot Hawaiian and you will die.

You need to wait for good learning conditions and that takes time. Or you just rush it and speed up the learning curve.

This all being said, if you are a good athlete and can spend 5 years going everyday, you should at that time be able to really surf.

Things to watch out for when you start:

Go to a beginners beach.
Stay away from localized beaches
Safety first
Learn etiquette and rules
Be cool and positive
Don't be a kook
Don't cut people off
Don't paddle out on people
Be in good shape
Don't paddle out with a big crew (especially if they are kooks)
Know your limits
Keep a low profile
Have respect for the ocean and others
Don't litter

Ignore these rules at your own peril.

Let me know if you have anymore questions.


RE: Surfing - InternationPlayboy - 12-08-2010 08:43 PM

(12-08-2010 05:24 AM)Kona Wrote:  The most important thing about surfing isn't your strength or your balance. It's your confidence. You gotta have it to be good, but you gotta be good to have it.

Aloha!

This is true with snowboarding as well. Confidence is 60%, everything else comes with confidence. And you basically have to be willing to get hurt to get better. If you aren't scaring the shit out of yourself here and there, you aren't going to progress.


RE: Surfing - FretDancer - 12-08-2010 08:45 PM

Great replies! Thats why I love this place.

@Kona: Solid solid line man I just loved it and thanks for sharing your input too.

@InternationalSwagger: Nice input, can't wait to get some pictures of me riding an awesome wave. Definitely adding surfing to my lifestyle will bring more pussy as a sideffect, which is great.

@GManifiesto: Thanks for answering some questions. I did some reading on Jaco Beach on Costa Rica. Seems like a cool place to start, and I got a friend living on San Jose who might help me out with directions and other stuff too. Now I just gotta build some dough up and get my ass out there!

Thanks for the other replies as well guys, keep em coming.

Also I'd like to know if there's such a thing as 'board renting' on beaches such as Jaco Beach. I ask this because I'm not sure if I'm ready to buy a board yet, so going to Jaco Beach and renting a board would be totally awesome.


RE: Surfing - Kona - 12-09-2010 03:27 AM

(12-08-2010 06:21 PM)thegmanifesto Wrote:  Almost everyone that can actually surf, has never taken "lessons". I am sure Kona would agree with this.

I took my first wave at 3. My grandpa took me out. I think I got barreled the first time, I was around 10.

The way started to get good at it was by watching and then surfing with guys that were just incredible. But when I took it to the next level was when I started teaching people how to surf. Not just punks off the road, or girls I was trying to swoop, but important people in my life. I taught my little brothers and my little sisters, my cousins, my nieces and nephews the ropes, and now I watch them charge like Kalani Chapman, and it's cool. Watch Kalani spit out in this video, this guy is good: http://triplecrownofsurfing.com/vtcs10/videos_view/this_is_kalani_chapman.

Again, knowing you taught someone well is a big confidence booster when you're out.

(12-08-2010 06:21 PM)FretDancer Wrote:  I did some reading on Jaco Beach on Costa Rica. Seems like a cool place to start

That's an excellent place to get started. Go stay at one of those camps so you're around people that know whats up wave wise, and you don't have to worry about where your boards are coming from. Here's a website: http://www.nomadsurfers.com/. The camps are also girl swooping goldmines.

No matter where you go, do your homework first. I'd hate to hear you went all the way to Tahiti and sat there for a week because you went during the low seaon, like I did. (went back and took down Teahupoo, though) Or you've never surfed in the State of California and the first time you get ready to you get to a break and find out it was where they spread John C. Holmes's ashes, so you go home, also like I did.

You're gonna need to find a spot with consistent swells the whole time you're there.

The Pipe Master's started today: http://www.triplecrownofsurfing.com/

Aloha!


RE: Surfing - Vacancier Permanent - 12-09-2010 04:26 AM

I've also been interested in surf for ever I can remember. Did windsurfing for a summer when I was growing up in France, in Biarritz. Had an awesome time, but then stopped. Now, I'd like to get at it again here in Thailand, either back to windsurfing or start surfing. Any good spots for Thailand for that?
Thanks guys for all the cool tips.


RE: Surfing - Invictus - 12-09-2010 06:41 AM

Impressive advice. Thanks G, Kona and Intl Swagger for taking the time to give a good response.

I don't want to hijack the thread, but specifically to Kona & G-manifesto:

I thought about Costa Rica, but I want to avoid too many tourists. I'm flying into Managua, Nicaragua mid-Jan. I did not even plan on going to San Juan del Sur (although I understand that place is becoming more and more famous), located close to the Costa Rican border. I figured stay further north, near El Salvador.

The link Kona provided was interesting, but it seems the prices are outrageously high. I was hoping I could get by with perhaps a few days instruction, then hit the waves on my own for a week, come back for more tips, rinse and repeat. I am prepared to dedicate a month full-time to this.

Am I being realistic? Thanks in advance.


RE: Surfing - thegmanifesto - 12-09-2010 02:54 PM

FretDancer,

I haven't been to Costa Rica in years (I went way before it got hot). Jaco I would assume by now is a madhouse. Back when I went, it was the only place I heard that had little crowds (so I skipped it). My idea of travel surfing isn't paddling out with a bunch of heads. Enough of that in California. It's about being the only one out with your friends.

That being said, I am sure you can walk down and find a peak to your brain. And it would probably be a decent place to learn. Also, you are near civilization, so if you get hurt, you wont have to travel hours over dusty roads to get to a hospital. (I have been injured a few times out in the sticks and jungles. Not exactly smooth.)

Costa Rica has tons of coastline. Explore.

Invictus,

Nic and El Salv supposedly have great waves. Never been. (Been to Panama though). I have many friends that swear by Nic and El Salv.

Good thread by the way. It's kind of funny since I rarely write about surfing on The G Manifesto (save a few slanged out cryptic references). Maybe I should write about it more.


RE: Surfing - Feo - 12-09-2010 03:33 PM

learn to duck dive

get tossed on a big wave

inhale some water

..now you are a pro, you can fuck lot of women.


RE: Surfing - Aliblahba - 12-09-2010 03:56 PM

FretDancer,

"G" is spot on with his advice. Learn the rules. Dropping in on someone is lower than whale shit. An ex pro that owned a board shop once told me "surfers were stewards of the sea". There's some truth to that. I was taught as a rule surfers watch out for swimmers, usually tourists. People don't understand the power of the ocean. I've never had to do it but a lot of guys I know have had to paddle in to rescue someone from the riptide or undertow.


RE: Surfing - thegmanifesto - 12-09-2010 04:56 PM

One more thing before I forget.

Understand that surfing is a very "hierarchical" sport.

The pecking order goes something like this (highest to lowest):

Top Locals from that beach (includes best surfers, enforcers, hoods etc)
Respectful professionals on the world tour
Respectful other Pros
Respectful people that can Surf
Respectful people that can almost surf
Disrespectful professionals
etc
etc

All the way on down to Kooks and beginners.

Notice a theme?

Knowing where you fit in and knowing your position will save you a lot of pain and headache. In many ways. Plus, following the rules will earn you respect and prevent you from getting discouraged.

(Keep in mind, none of the applies if you are on a beach all by yourself.)


RE: Surfing - InternationPlayboy - 12-09-2010 05:21 PM

(12-09-2010 04:56 PM)thegmanifesto Wrote:  One more thing before I forget.

Understand that surfing is a very "hierarchical" sport.

The pecking order goes something like this (highest to lowest):

Top Locals from that beach (includes best surfers, enforcers, hoods etc)
Respectful professionals on the world tour
Respectful other Pros
Respectful people that can Surf
Respectful people that can almost surf
Disrespectful professionals
etc
etc

All the way on down to Kooks and beginners.

Notice a theme?

Knowing where you fit in and knowing your position will save you a lot of pain and headache. In many ways. Plus, following the rules will earn you respect and prevent you from getting discouraged.

(Keep in mind, none of the applies if you are on a beach all by yourself.)

This is important and sometimes hard to follow when you are first learning. A lot of beginers don't even realize they are really pissing people off or stealing someones wave. It can also get you hurt, not only because people are gonna want to beat you up, but also because it's dangerous to cut people off, they might run into you, it might cause some damage. Sometimes I can't believe people go into the big park without knowing what they are doing. They stand at the landing of jumps and get ran over, some of them have the nerve to get mad at you for hitting them. People standing in front of jumps/lips, people getting stuck on boxes, people not knowing there skill level, hitting 40 foot booters and over shooting them to flat. I even watched a dad let his daughter, couldn't have been more than 5 years old and MAYBE 3 feet tall go off a 35 ft. booter with a 15 foot lip. Poor little girl didn't know how close she came to seriously hurting herself, but somehow she stuck it out (And no she didn't clear the jump, she got about 5 feet out from the lip and cased it hard, don't know how she wasn't hurt). You better believe we gave that dad a peice of our minds. Just use common sense when riding, whether it be surfing, snowboarding, skiing, dirtbiking, any sport that is somewhat dangerous, use your head, and don't use it to break your fall.


RE: Surfing - FretDancer - 12-09-2010 10:24 PM

Thanks for the advice guys. And I got no problem breaking the rules, I'm all for the harmony when it comes to the ocean, I've always loved the sea.

So I guess Jaco Beach will be my starting point. I'll see if I start working on January and save up for a couple of months and head my way to Jaco! Big Grin


RE: Surfing - Roosh - 12-10-2010 02:27 AM

Easy analogies can be made between surfing and pickup. It's more about the journey, and if you get deep enough your whole life revolves around it.

Start with a week-long camp, and go from there. Instruction will shorten your learning curve.


RE: Surfing - Invictus - 12-10-2010 02:52 AM

@ Roosh: did you start late? If so, when?

To all you other cats: thanks for the great advice.


RE: Surfing - faznine15 - 01-13-2011 03:50 PM

I was lucky enough to get laid off in 08 and have the great state of California pay me to learn how to surf. With nothing to do but look for work in a part of the the country that had none I took to learning how to surf to fill the extra time.

Living 2 blocks the beach in San Diego made it as easy as it could get. Be prepared it is the hardest thing I have ever done in my life.

All my friends surfed at a decent level and I decided my goal was to learn how to surf just slightly better than the worst one. I went out close to 5 days a week for a minimum an hour at time. The only times I didn't go out were if it was too big to be safe.

At that rate it took me close 9 solid months until I was accepted as a "surfer" and started getting asked to go on surf trips to Mexico. However, the current joke is that I'm the worst surfer anybody knows, but they still count me as a surfer. It may take 15 years of practice to get as good as the groms you see ripping out there.

It was probably the most rewarding thing I've ever done in my life. The best part about it is that practicing is fun. Even the worst possible scenario such as you paddle around like and asshole for 2 hours and only catch one wave its still way more enjoyable then watching CSI reruns.

It will get you in the kind of shape that makes women want to fuck you.

I ended up moving to DC which was an epic fail. Ive surfed 3 times since the move when hurricanes rolled through. If you dont' live near the beach you can't learn. So.

1. Move no less than 15 min from a beach. (CA, NJ, NC, SC, FL, VA) all have beach towns that you can live in for 1/3 the rent of a DC or Arlington shithole. You can't learn on a vacation.

2. Quit your job and surf everyday for a year or be prepared to wait ~3 years part time to get decent

3. Be prepared to have your life wholly consumed. You will check the forecast 10 times a day and plan your honeymoon based on the best surfing at that time of year.

4. Enjoy your newfound healthy hobby for the rest of your life. I routinely say 60+ OG surfers out on retro hobbie long boards loving life.