Roosh V Forum
The Car Repair thread - Printable Version

+- Roosh V Forum (https://www.rooshvforum.com)
+-- Forum: Main (/forum-1.html)
+--- Forum: Life (/forum-14.html)
+--- Thread: The Car Repair thread (/thread-41139.html)

Pages: 1 2 3


The Car Repair thread - Captain Ahab - 10-08-2014 07:28 AM

I wanted to start a thread on do it yourself car repair.

I know this forum has a lot of gear heads so I figured I’d take the opportunity to pick some brains on how to start this venture.

The benefits of doing so are obvious: save money on car repairs, learn the ins and outs of your vehicle, etc.

I’d love to get a conversation started on this.

What kind of cars you guys working with? What is your expertise in areas related to car repair?

I drive a 2007 Toyota Corolla CE. I have 132,000 miles on it.

I got a print out from the Toyota dealer after an inspection. Maintenance wise, I need a catalytic convertor replaced(check engine light on-verified by Auozone code look up), my transmission fluid is dirty(haven’t done a transflush on my car yet),and my O2 sensor needs to be replaced. I need to change my air fliter, a gasket, and all four of my tires. Toyota wants over $2000 dollars in money to repair my car. They want $1300 for the catalytic convertor alone. I will be looking for a second opinion of course.

I’ve been following this article on LifeHacker: http://lifehacker.com/5868374/the-car-repairs-you-can-seriously-do-yourself-despite-your-abilities

The article gives you a break down of the basic car maintenance repairs and the tools needed to do the different jobs they talk about. I got everything on their basic list of tools except a socket and ratchet set.

I heard Youtube has some great do it yourself videos as well.

I plan on ordering the Haynes Manual for my car this month and working through it next month. http://www.amazon.com/Toyota-Corolla-Service-Repair-Manual/dp/1844257916/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412769091&sr=8-1&keywords=Haynes+manual+2007+Corolla For now I'm chewing on my factory car manual.

I want to get into motorcycle riding/repair as well. I am currently saving up money to purchase a bike. If you guys have any information on motorcycles, what it takes to get a motorcycle license, cheap starter motorcycles I can get within a budget ($2000), cheap gear, etc, then let me know. I’ve never rode a motorcycle before and want to learn how.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - el mechanico - 10-08-2014 07:38 AM

What code did the cat set? P0420?

You can buy the part from discount converters online. You need your own scan tool too..
http://jbtoolsales.com/launch-3010500116-creader-professional-123-scan-tool-for-eng-abs-srs-at/?gclid=CjwKEAjwwdOhBRCG0fPrlfO1gGUSJAC1FmHXuGPohHTnPnLdhO8eDj4mfhxQUSROobjTFwcsZ​0GJ-xoCsuPw_wcB


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - AntiTrace - 10-08-2014 07:46 AM

A catalytic converter is pretty easy to replace. The toyota dealer also quoted you using the OEM cat. Heres a search: http://www.carid.com/search/2007-toyota-corolla-ce-catalytic-converter. Dealers almost always quote you using OEM parts. If I take mine to the dealer, I always pick up the parts first. You lose the "dealer" part warranty, but most manufactures have their own warranty anyways.

I suggest looking at your exhaust diagram and seeing what you need. Replace your cat, 02 sensors, and be prepared to replace your muffler. My cat just went, it rusted out and clogged the muffler. I essentially had to replace everything from the headers back.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - YossariansRight - 10-08-2014 08:44 AM

Not exactly DIY, but a nice money saving tip: Check and see if your city/town has a vocational or trade school. If they do, they may do repairs, maintenance, etc. on your vehicle for just the price of parts (which they usually get at a discount and without sales tax). This can be a huge money saver.

My family did this for years and the quality of the work (everything from replacing a battery, to changing the transmission fluid to a full engine service) was always perfect - we never had a problem with any of the work that was done.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - DJ-Matt - 10-08-2014 08:44 AM

1998 Dodge Ram 1500 3.9L v6 - 170,000
2005 Jeep Wrangler SE 2.4L i4 - 101,000

I took auto shop in HS, and while in college I took several major topic courses (engine, brakes, suspension, etc).

Replaced a fuel injector on the truck yesterday to fix a P0301 (Cyl 1 misfire).
So far I've done:

- Plugs (switched to a colder plug to prevent pinging)
- Ign coil
- Ign wires
- Cap/rotor (first time)
- Front/rear o2 sensors
- Brakes
- PCV valve
- Seafoaming (smoky fun)
- Throttle body cleaning
- Wiring of +12v battery lead to tow connector, and brake controller

It's a Magnum engine, so I have the plenum gasket failure hanging over me. When that goes I won't be in the mood for repair so I'm going to try the community college auto shop and have them do it. BTW, that's exactly what I did in school, we worked on cars for free and the owners just paid for parts. And yes the work is always good because the instructor is watching very carefully.


The Jeep is my "prestige" car and in perfect shape, but I have done some minor items:

- Change synchromesh manual tranny fluid
- Transfer case fluid (it's ATF)
- Plugs
- Mopar combustion chamber cleaner (like seafoam but expensive)
- Brakes
- Thermostat


I used to buy those Haynes manuals, until I figured out you can very easily find the factory service manual for your vehicle online in a PDF. I have the Chrysler FSMs for both my vehicles and just print out the pages I need during service.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Beyond Borders - 10-08-2014 08:48 AM

(10-08-2014 08:44 AM)YossariansRight Wrote:  Not exactly DIY, but a nice money saving tip: Check and see if your city/town has a vocational or trade school. If they do, they may do repairs, maintenance, etc. on your vehicle for just the price of parts (which they usually get at a discount and without sales tax). This can be a huge money saver.

My family did this for years and the quality of the work (everything from replacing a battery, to changing the transmission fluid to a full engine service) was always perfect - we never had a problem with any of the work that was done.

My mom works for the public school system and has gotten a lot of mileage out of the high school auto shops. Probably a bit more of a gamble, but she's pretty poor, and it's surely good enough for the basics.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Captain Ahab - 10-08-2014 08:50 AM

(10-08-2014 07:38 AM)el mechanico Wrote:  What code did the cat set? P0420?

You can buy the part from discount converters online. You need your own scan tool too..
http://jbtoolsales.com/launch-3010500116-creader-professional-123-scan-tool-for-eng-abs-srs-at/?gclid=CjwKEAjwwdOhBRCG0fPrlfO1gGUSJAC1FmHXuGPohHTnPnLdhO8eDj4mfhxQUSROobjTFwcsZ​0GJ-xoCsuPw_wcB

I'd have to look at the paperwork. But from what the guy told me, he said the issue is with the converter. And yes, I need my own scan tool. I will invest in one in the near future.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Captain Ahab - 10-08-2014 08:52 AM

(10-08-2014 07:46 AM)AntiTrace Wrote:  A catalytic converter is pretty easy to replace. The toyota dealer also quoted you using the OEM cat. Heres a search: http://www.carid.com/search/2007-toyota-corolla-ce-catalytic-converter. Dealers almost always quote you using OEM parts. If I take mine to the dealer, I always pick up the parts first. You lose the "dealer" part warranty, but most manufactures have their own warranty anyways.

I suggest looking at your exhaust diagram and seeing what you need. Replace your cat, 02 sensors, and be prepared to replace your muffler. My cat just went, it rusted out and clogged the muffler. I essentially had to replace everything from the headers back.

Can I replace the cat and 02 sensors myself? I like your suggestion of buying the part and going to the mechanic first, get a discount I imagine.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - YossariansRight - 10-08-2014 08:57 AM

(10-08-2014 08:48 AM)Beyond Borders Wrote:  
(10-08-2014 08:44 AM)YossariansRight Wrote:  Not exactly DIY, but a nice money saving tip: Check and see if your city/town has a vocational or trade school. If they do, they may do repairs, maintenance, etc. on your vehicle for just the price of parts (which they usually get at a discount and without sales tax). This can be a huge money saver.

My family did this for years and the quality of the work (everything from replacing a battery, to changing the transmission fluid to a full engine service) was always perfect - we never had a problem with any of the work that was done.

My mom works for the public school system and has gotten a lot of mileage out of the high school auto shops. Probably a bit more of a gamble, but she's pretty poor, and it's surely good enough for the basics.

There you go - another real world example. If it's an option, why not use it, right?


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Beyond Borders - 10-08-2014 09:00 AM

Regarding moto repairs, I found this online: http://www.dansmc.com/mc_repaircourse.htm

I think it's all free info.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Chaos - 10-08-2014 09:04 AM

Good thread.
This is my main side hustle.
I'm buying cars with some damages or errors, fix them in my garage and sell them for a higher price.

A lot of money to be made here.

In fact I'm going right now to check out my next object.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Captain Ahab - 10-08-2014 10:13 AM

(10-08-2014 08:44 AM)DJ-Matt Wrote:  1998 Dodge Ram 1500 3.9L v6 - 170,000
2005 Jeep Wrangler SE 2.4L i4 - 101,000

I took auto shop in HS, and while in college I took several major topic courses (engine, brakes, suspension, etc).

Replaced a fuel injector on the truck yesterday to fix a P0301 (Cyl 1 misfire).
So far I've done:

- Plugs (switched to a colder plug to prevent pinging)
- Ign coil
- Ign wires
- Cap/rotor (first time)
- Front/rear o2 sensors
- Brakes
- PCV valve
- Seafoaming (smoky fun)
- Throttle body cleaning
- Wiring of +12v battery lead to tow connector, and brake controller

It's a Magnum engine, so I have the plenum gasket failure hanging over me. When that goes I won't be in the mood for repair so I'm going to try the community college auto shop and have them do it. BTW, that's exactly what I did in school, we worked on cars for free and the owners just paid for parts. And yes the work is always good because the instructor is watching very carefully.


The Jeep is my "prestige" car and in perfect shape, but I have done some minor items:

- Change synchromesh manual tranny fluid
- Transfer case fluid (it's ATF)
- Plugs
- Mopar combustion chamber cleaner (like seafoam but expensive)
- Brakes
- Thermostat


I used to buy those Haynes manuals, until I figured out you can very easily find the factory service manual for your vehicle online in a PDF. I have the Chrysler FSMs for both my vehicles and just print out the pages I need during service.

Wow. N-I-C-E specs. I like how you print out the pages you need when you need them. I may look into signing up for a class at a community college around here in auto repair. My job pays for it anyway.

What made you go with the jeep for your main squeeze?


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Captain Ahab - 10-08-2014 10:14 AM

(10-08-2014 09:00 AM)Beyond Borders Wrote:  Regarding moto repairs, I found this online: http://www.dansmc.com/mc_repaircourse.htm

I think it's all free info.

Holy crap...that is the jack pot for motorcycle repair, and all for free. Smile

Thanks Beyond.

I'll look into this during my down time.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Captain Ahab - 10-08-2014 10:25 AM

I am putting in some overtime this week and hopefully next week so I can buy my socket and ratchet set, haynes manual for my car, oil fliter, funnel, and oil filter wrench. I want to learn how to change my oil.

Also, any of you guys listen to car talk? Two brothers, mechanics, talk about random subjects while callers call in with their car issues.You can pick up a lot of random information about car repairs listening to the show. I think they have free podcasts.

http://www.cartalk.com/

Thanks for the replies guys. I like where this thread is going.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - AntiTrace - 10-08-2014 10:48 AM

(10-08-2014 08:52 AM)Captain Ahab Wrote:  
(10-08-2014 07:46 AM)AntiTrace Wrote:  A catalytic converter is pretty easy to replace. The toyota dealer also quoted you using the OEM cat. Heres a search: http://www.carid.com/search/2007-toyota-corolla-ce-catalytic-converter. Dealers almost always quote you using OEM parts. If I take mine to the dealer, I always pick up the parts first. You lose the "dealer" part warranty, but most manufactures have their own warranty anyways.

I suggest looking at your exhaust diagram and seeing what you need. Replace your cat, 02 sensors, and be prepared to replace your muffler. My cat just went, it rusted out and clogged the muffler. I essentially had to replace everything from the headers back.

Can I replace the cat and 02 sensors myself? I like your suggestion of buying the part and going to the mechanic first, get a discount I imagine.

chances are yes. depends on your setup.

Mine was a ll bolt on. I had to remove the Y pipe (which has the cats on it). All that was holding it on was 4 bolts, 2 for each side of the Y.

The 02 sensors (I had 4) are located on the Y. I put the new O2 sensors in the new Y before I installed the new the Y. Bolted the new Y on, reconnected the 02 plugs, and hung the pipe back up. Really simple job, but its a lot harder without a hydraulic lift. You can however, rent lifts (and sometimes tools) by the hour from certain places.

I still had a power loss issue. I inspected the muffler and found it was clogged from all the rust the cats were spitting back into it. new muffler install.

Still had power loss. Pulled spark plugs, they were disgusting. Since I did plugs I figured I would do my wires as well.

With all parts it came to around $900. Just for the new Y pipe and o2 sensors I was quoted 1800. If they wouldve added in a muffler, plugs, and wires, I have no doubt it wouldve been in the 2200 range.

So $1500 in savings by doing it myself.

I dont have too much experience, but I'm lucky enough to have a friend who does. I bring my vehicles and parts to him, with a case of beer, and we bullshit and fix stuff. I end up learning a lot in the process. I return the favor as well when hes doing a project that requires a second person.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - AntiTrace - 10-08-2014 10:55 AM

google 2007 Toyota Corolla CE exhaust diagram and find your year.

I'm guessing for a smaller sedan it's a pretty simply fix, as long as nothing is really blocking access to the pipes or bolts.

also, if its just your cat, you can pick up a cat real cheap, cut out your old one, and have a friend weld the new on in place. thats the easiest way.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - el mechanico - 10-08-2014 10:59 AM

(10-08-2014 10:55 AM)AntiTrace Wrote:  google 2007 Toyota Corolla CE exhaust diagram and find your year.

I'm guessing for a smaller sedan it's a pretty simply fix, as long as nothing is really blocking access to the pipes or bolts.

also, if its just your cat, you can pick up a cat real cheap, cut out your old one, and have a friend weld the new on in place. thats the easiest way.
I wouldn't due to the cheap cost of direct fit converters online.

The problem you might have is with the bolts snapping off.


toyota repair - Jack198 - 10-08-2014 11:04 AM

I've been fixing my own cars for over 25 years, all sorts of makes and models. I've never bought a new car and I never will, since I can fix the easy stuff and know enough to not get screwed when I take it in for the bigger jobs.

That price for your Toyota repair is quite reasonable, especially for a dealer. But I'd still say you could shop around a bit at muffler shops for a better price on the catalytic converter, and maybe see if there is an independent shop who can beat the rest of the prices.

I try to stay away from dealers unless I have a warranty. Dealers also often times do not take the time to diagnose the problem and just throw the most expensive solution at it.

Example: you have a leak in your power steering system coming from the pump. A dealer will replace the pump, but an independent shop may notice that the leak is coming from the reservoir (part of the pump) and replace only that - much cheaper. The dealer has such a volume of business they aren't worried about the small stuff, but the independent mechanic wants to build loyalty so they may make the extra effort to save you money and solve what needs to be solved.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - Chaos - 10-08-2014 12:28 PM

Fuck me. A fat dude bought my next small project right in front of my nose.
If I had gone 15min earlier I had got it.

Anyway. For those who are interesting in hustling with cars, this is what I did last week.

Bought an Volvo V70 for 850€.
It hadn't been driven with for a while and the time of inspection had passed so it wasn't legal to drive with it.

I went to the inspection with the car, costed me 90€+10€ for changing the owner. Didn't pass because the handbrake was a bit weak and som light problems.

Drove it straight to my garage, ripped off the backtires and started jerking with the handbrake. After some jerking and adjusting ,the handbrake functioned again.
Then I changed 3 light burners for 3€.

The next day I went to inspection again and it passed. 23€

I put the car online and within a week I sold it for 2000€

3-4hours of work.
+ 1024€.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - DJ-Matt - 10-08-2014 01:06 PM

(10-08-2014 10:13 AM)Captain Ahab Wrote:  Wow. N-I-C-E specs. I like how you print out the pages you need when you need them. I may look into signing up for a class at a community college around here in auto repair. My job pays for it anyway.

What made you go with the jeep for your main squeeze?

A blue Jeep was my first car when getting my first full-time job and could afford something better than the 95 Toyota Tercel I was driving (gets even better mileage than a Corolla). Chicks love it, and I like the freedom of a completely open car in the warm months. After selling it and getting a truck I realize that I'd made a huge mistake
[Image: Ive-made-a-huge-mistake.jpg]
So I searched for weeks to find another one the same model and got my dream car back. I'm waiting for Chrysler to put the 4 cyl option back in the Jeeps or a diesel before I give this one up. It should run forever.



If you're going to spend the big bucks I'd get one of these as your scan tool, they do so much more:

[Image: ScanGauge_large.jpg]

Taxes and shit take most of the profit out of flipping cars, but I've had good luck with tow lot auctions. Bought a Cherokee 4WD that was missing the front driveshaft. A few other minor repairs and putting in a new shaft made it worth my while.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - oilbreh - 10-08-2014 02:09 PM

here are some other options for people with the catalytic converter problems.

A) Lacquer Thinner - Run some lacquer thinner, 1 quart to 7 gallons of gas, run you car through the tank. Might clean up things up.

B) Remove the catalyric converter and soak/clean it with some heavy duty detergent. If its light enough some compressed air might work.

C) Never tried these, do more research a) Bake it at a really hi temperature b) Carb cleaner through top 02 sensor port. Warning shit might explode if too much.

D) Gut it, or install a blank or just do nothing, then for the second 02 sensor you will have to buy a special thing (really just a resistor I think can make yourself if you really want) that is for "off road use only". Plugs into the post catalytic converter 02 sensor plug and emulates the right reading. Online probably 20 bucks, at a muffler shop maybe 50.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - germanico - 10-09-2014 12:33 PM

Haynes manuals are the best way to learn how to do your own repairs. They basically cover everything (I have an older one that even explains how to do body and paint work, dont know if newer ones have that). Then its only a matter of what equpment you have or how willing are you to risk botching up a repair. Worst case, you end up hauling all the pieces to a mechanic.

At the very least, learn how to do the oil changes yourself. Ive never paid for an oil change since I discovered just how easy they are to do. Just loosen a bolt, wait until the drip stops, tighten the bolt again but not too much, and fill her up with clean oil. The hardest part is getting rid of the used oil, but since my car is a VW bug and usually uses 2-3 liters of oil per change, Im just keeping it in a 5 gallon jerry can until I find something to do with it.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - faznine15 - 10-09-2014 01:59 PM

Start with something small and see how it goes. You're likely going to either hate or love this. I've worked on cars and motorcyles for years and have the solid know how and tools but often find myself not doing my own repairs.

If I'm a friends shopt with every tool on the planet, a lift, and all the other random essentials like grease then I can crank some repairs out in no time while drinking a few cold ones and have a blast doing it.

Changing a water pump in a gravel driveway in the winter as the sun sets or in some dimly lit two car garage when its 99 degrees out quickly reminds me how much I'm willing to pay someone else to do this kind of shit.

I find oil changes also fall in the pain in the ass category unless you've got the space to save the oil inbetween runs to the recylcing center. The job is easy its just dealing with the mess afterwards thats the pain.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - oilbreh - 10-09-2014 02:14 PM

(10-09-2014 12:33 PM)germanico Wrote:  At the very least, learn how to do the oil changes yourself. Ive never paid for an oil change since I discovered just how easy they are to do. Just loosen a bolt, wait until the drip stops, tighten the bolt again but not too much, and fill her up with clean oil. The hardest part is getting rid of the used oil, but since my car is a VW bug and usually uses 2-3 liters of oil per change, Im just keeping it in a 5 gallon jerry can until I find something to do with it.

I hope you are changing the filter also Banana

On a side note, most PUAs here bitch about women not being feminine enough these days, yet apparently something a 13 year old boy should know is something people here are learning in their 20s. At least people are moving in right direction here even if its for cost saving measures.
Buy tools used. The will hold value. Having a lift is the holy grail.


RE: Do It Yourself:Car and Motorcyle Repair Thread - weambulance - 10-09-2014 03:20 PM

Haynes manuals are just okay. They're a hell of a lot easier to read than a factory service manual, granted, but they are by no means 100% accurate. That's because they cover a wide range of production years (generally a single generation) and mid-generation changes are common, and the Haynes manual doesn't always include those distinctions. So, before you go out and buy parts or fluids based on what the Haynes manual says, at least look at what you're going to be working on to see if reality matches the diagrams and instructions.

In the same vein, parts stores are not always to be trusted. The internet is your friend. It really sucks pulling something apart then realizing the store gave you the wrong part because its computer indexing system is screwed up, especially if you don't have another easy way to get to the store or it's late on a Sunday.