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Orthodox Conversion - Dragan - 11-29-2017 10:57 PM

I've been a member of a mainline protestant denomination my whole life, and only after getting red-pilled did I start to notice the more unsavory aspects of my mainstream church ie: support for abortion, gay marriage, illegal immigration etc.

There was always a feeling, prior to this, that i didn't belong as a protestant. I think in some way, prosperity gospel that was originally a thing with mega churches, has started to infiltrate normal protestant churches. That, coupled with the SJW stuff has turned me off Protestantism. Also, in my experience the church as a whole just seemed to make up doctrine as it went along, which is not good at all.

I had ancestors who were orthodox but they converted when they immigrated. Having recently lived in Slavic Europe, i like what i saw with the orthodox church. The only thing that makes me uneasy is the state's support of (most) orthodox churches (from my understanding of it). I've been to a service too, and i liked the way worship was conducted. Standing up, singing with voices only, etc.

Can anyone that's orthodox give me some advise on converting, and maybe try to be devil's advocate and give me reasons why I shouldn't convert? I've been thinking about converting quite a while now (3-4 years now), and I'd love to get some perspective from someone in the church.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - EndsExpect - 11-29-2017 11:56 PM

(11-29-2017 10:57 PM)Dragan Wrote:  Can anyone that's orthodox give me some advise on converting, and maybe try to be devil's advocate and give me reasons why I shouldn't convert? I've been thinking about converting quite a while now (3-4 years now), and I'd love to get some perspective from someone in the church.

I'm not in the church, but I came very, very close to converting back in 2001. Orthodox Theology is on point. The more popular protestant churches are for idiots. They don't even understand their own religion. I got really deep into theology in my early 20's, to the point where I was studying the difference between Infralapsarianism
and Supralapsarianism. I think most Orthodox churches are around 90% correct if you care about that stuff.

I will also add that back then the church I was attended was stuffed wall to wall with hot young virgins. If you are willing to marry they have some amazing wife material in that church. I have a friend who just married one. She was 26 and still a virgin... if that's your thing.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Dragan - 11-30-2017 12:08 AM

(11-29-2017 11:56 PM)EndsExpect Wrote:  I will also add that back then the church I was attended was stuffed wall to wall with hot young virgins. If you are willing to marry they have some amazing wife material in that church. I have a friend who just married one. She was 26 and still a virgin... if that's your thing.

Thanks for this info, hoping ultimately to meet a conservative chick who isn't completely Westernized.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Laska - 11-30-2017 01:20 AM

Just go to church and keep going to church. If it moves you toward virtue and away from sin, then convert.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - stugatz - 11-30-2017 03:30 AM

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-53887.html

Make a post on this thread - it's decently long and you'll probably get quite a few answers and tips there, too.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Kid Twist - 11-30-2017 01:24 PM

"I love it when a plan comes together"

What's the plan?

"More than that, blessed are those who hear the word of God, and keep it."


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Tony_Flame - 12-01-2017 01:48 AM

Here is a very good Video from Baptist Preacher Steven Anderson on the subject of "Orthodoxy". He has a similiar criticism video on catholocism, which I appreciate even though Im catholic myself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WLTcfWOKB4

It might offend people, but he preaches the truth and relies on the bible (gods words) as the final authoritiy in religios matters.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Noir - 12-01-2017 02:51 AM

I am Orthodox, you will need to be baptized in an Orthodox church by an Orthodox priest.

It's nothing special but hey, if you vibe with it, go for it.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Dragan - 12-01-2017 12:06 PM

(12-01-2017 02:51 AM)Noir Wrote:  I am Orthodox, you will need to be baptized in an Orthodox church by an Orthodox priest.

It's nothing special but hey, if you vibe with it, go for it.

Right. But how long does it take?


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Laska - 12-01-2017 12:31 PM

^^Usually a year.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Dragan - 12-01-2017 12:36 PM

(12-01-2017 12:31 PM)Laska Wrote:  ^^Usually a year.

Good to know.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Laska - 12-01-2017 12:52 PM

(12-01-2017 01:48 AM)Tony_Flame Wrote:  Here is a very good Video from Baptist Preacher Steven Anderson on the subject of "Orthodoxy". He has a similiar criticism video on catholocism, which I appreciate even though Im catholic myself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WLTcfWOKB4

It might offend people, but he preaches the truth and relies on the bible (gods words) as the final authoritiy in religios matters.

Steven Anderson is an intelligent man, with insights and boldness; he's willing to stand for the truth about things like the gay-sex movement. Here, however, he takes parts of the Bible out of context or relies on his own interpretations. That's why he says that people are saved by belief in Christ, rather than being saved by faith (conviction) in Christ, which must involve works, because if you have conviction in something, you act on it. This is why James said that faith without works is dead.

One of the things that's bad about him, and you can see this here, is that he is one of those Protestants with a Very narrow definition of who Christians are, that excludes most of the world's Christians.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Kid Twist - 12-01-2017 10:26 PM

(12-01-2017 01:48 AM)Tony_Flame Wrote:  Here is a very good Video from Baptist Preacher Steven Anderson on the subject of "Orthodoxy". He has a similiar criticism video on catholocism, which I appreciate even though Im catholic myself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WLTcfWOKB4

It might offend people, but he preaches the truth and relies on the bible (gods words) as the final authoritiy in religios matters.

This man is mostly maniacal. I got a kick out of him for being so silly, but not only does he misrepresent things there, he is someone who has no clue about what he doesn't know.

That's generally what you get from people who say things like "The King James Bible is the inerrant word of God".

He states such things but then says other people don't make sense? It's just weird. Within the first 2 minutes of that sermon he had already contradicted himself. "The Orthodox Church states that works are the way to be saved". Then he lists a few seconds later what he reads off of some document that puts (among other things) #1. Faith.

Wtf


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Jetset - 12-02-2017 10:11 AM

(12-01-2017 10:26 PM)Kid Twist Wrote:  "The King James Bible is the inerrant word of God".

[Image: troll-face-meme.png]

I'll make time to watch this. It sounds great.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Kid Twist - 12-02-2017 11:59 AM

^ It is funny, because the guy (and I don't think he is personally/mentally stupid, just on a preacher type "high" of self righteousness, with silly pronouncements and beliefs) would never be able to tell you where he derives his authority. If he knew anything about the "Bible" its collection, evolution, compilation and textual analysis, hermeneutics, etc he could never say something that is akin to looking at the bible like a Quranic manuscript that fell from the sky. Of course, similar to other weird, confused literalists, there are 30k protestant teachers that somehow all come to slightly different interpretations of why they should be followed vs the other guy.

The Bible never says that its text should be followed in a literal way or that's "all you need" which is the supreme irony: These bible only people use an extrabiblical tradition, which is what they complain others do!

The man is part of a "religion" that was created in the 17th century. But he knows more about the bible and worship of god in spirit and truth than the people who have the most ancient churches in the same area where the original christians were --- people who, I might add, have not ever changed their doctrine and practice. Think about how stupid that is.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - IronShark - 12-05-2017 09:33 PM

I've started researching/reading more about Orthodox Christianity and have been attending to an Orthodox church on regular basis recently. I also have weekly one to one session with my priest.

From my limited knowledge, I find Orthodox Christianity the most traditional trend in Christianity faith, mainly because it hasn't been changed much over the time. Their views on family, homosexuality, and multiculturalism are extremely RedPill. I don't know if I have decided to convert. However, I don't find a major problem with that in long-term.

This is a useful Youtube Channel to start with:






RE: Orthodox Conversion - Kid Twist - 12-06-2017 08:48 PM

^ Trend, IronShark? Haha, keep up the good work. When you find out what the "Bee" reference is, you'll really see this treasure for what it is.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Nacho - 12-07-2017 02:57 AM

I left evangelical protestantism for Orthodoxy as well and never looked back. The majesty of the Orthodox Church is night and day compared to the circus show that many evangelical churches have devolved into. I used to cringe at the tackiness of certain aspects of the protestant church services I used to attend at various churches over the years. I definitely don't miss the gay campy worship songs that were typically led by some cuck with bleached blond hair and torn jeans.

In my opinion, a good amount of Protestantism amounts to nothing more than a personality cult revolving around the pastor and 'leaders' of the church. Power struggles and church splits are a common occurrence. The theology and doctrine are absolutely terrible as well. For all the claims I have seen of being 'bible only' believing churches, it's just not credible with thousands of denominations.

For those interested in Orthodoxy, my advice is to simply attend the Liturgy with an open heart. Unclutter your mind and let it soak in. Don't stress about theology or differences in doctrine. That understanding with the historic underpinnings of the faith will come with time. This is the same advice a wise priest gave when I first started attending. In my western christian mindset, I initially tried to break things down in a very formulaic way with my initial struggles. You will begin to slowly experience the 'Orthodox way.' Unlike the shallowness of Protestantism, Orthodoxy is like a treasure chest that you will never reach the bottom of. A book I highly recommend is called The Mountain of Silence by Kyriacos M Markides. It gets to the heart of Eastern Orthodox spirituality. Anything written by Alexander Schmemann as well.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Dragan - 12-09-2017 08:59 PM

(12-07-2017 02:57 AM)Nacho Wrote:  I left evangelical protestantism for Orthodoxy as well and never looked back. The majesty of the Orthodox Church is night and day compared to the circus show that many evangelical churches have devolved into. I used to cringe at the tackiness of certain aspects of the protestant church services I used to attend at various churches over the years. I definitely don't miss the gay campy worship songs that were typically led by some cuck with bleached blond hair and torn jeans.

In my opinion, a good amount of Protestantism amounts to nothing more than a personality cult revolving around the pastor and 'leaders' of the church. Power struggles and church splits are a common occurrence. The theology and doctrine are absolutely terrible as well. For all the claims I have seen of being 'bible only' believing churches, it's just not credible with thousands of denominations.

For those interested in Orthodoxy, my advice is to simply attend the Liturgy with an open heart. Unclutter your mind and let it soak in. Don't stress about theology or differences in doctrine. That understanding with the historic underpinnings of the faith will come with time. This is the same advice a wise priest gave when I first started attending. In my western christian mindset, I initially tried to break things down in a very formulaic way with my initial struggles. You will begin to slowly experience the 'Orthodox way.' Unlike the shallowness of Protestantism, Orthodoxy is like a treasure chest that you will never reach the bottom of. A book I highly recommend is called The Mountain of Silence by Kyriacos M Markides. It gets to the heart of Eastern Orthodox spirituality. Anything written by Alexander Schmemann as well.

Thanks for the recommendation. Hopefully be able to attend a holiday service here soon.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - buja - 12-09-2017 10:36 PM

(12-01-2017 10:26 PM)Kid Twist Wrote:  
(12-01-2017 01:48 AM)Tony_Flame Wrote:  It might offend people, but he preaches the truth and relies on the bible (gods words) as the final authoritiy in religios matters.
That's generally what you get from people who say things like "The King James Bible is the inerrant word of God".

He states such things but then says other people don't make sense? It's just weird. Within the first 2 minutes of that sermon he had already contradicted himself. "The Orthodox Church states that works are the way to be saved". Then he lists a few seconds later what he reads off of some document that puts (among other things) #1. Faith.

James 2:14-26 King James Version (KJV)
14 What doth it profit, my brethren, though a man say he hath faith, and have not works? can faith save him?
15 If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food,
16 And one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit?
17 Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone.
18 Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works.
19 Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble.
20 But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?
21 Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar?
22 Seest thou how faith wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect?
23 And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God.
24 Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only.
25 Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?
26 For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.

The Evangelicals go into verbal gymnastics trying to explain this one away.

These Evangelicals declare themselves "SAVED" and everyone else is condemned to hell...even people who actually do what the Bible says, people who are actually doers of the word (James 1:22)

Tell me Evangelicals...where in the Bible does it say you can just declare yourself "SAVED"?


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Nacho - 12-09-2017 11:08 PM

Great point above. They won't be able to answer it. It's why Martin Luther wanted the book of James removed from the canon of scripture.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - The Beast1 - 12-11-2017 01:37 AM

(12-09-2017 10:36 PM)buja Wrote:  Tell me Evangelicals...where in the Bible does it say you can just declare yourself "SAVED"?

The belief comes from this statement:

Quote:John 14:6

6 Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.


The thought process goes, "I believe Jesus is the only path to salvation, he says this in John, therefore I am saved."

Which touches upon an interesting point brought up by Nacho as to the reasons why Martin Luther made an argument for the removal of these books. In an overzealous effort, he organized the new testament by weighing each canonical book against what Jesus actually said. This one passage being an interesting connundrum because he felt the message was apocryphal against what was said in John.

The mention of Abraham in the scripture is quite telling. Abraham had so much faith in God, that he was willing to kill his son Isaac on God's command alone! Because Abraham's faith was so strong knowing that God would provide for whatever the next steps were without abandoning them, Abraham's acts were enough to prove to God that Abraham's faith was strong.

The general belief of this is thought to mean: If God called upon you to take up a cause through your heart, would you heed God's call on your faith alone even if that call meant having to give up your worldly possessions or even your first born son? The call could be anything from becoming a religious leader to donating your time at the soup kitchen or in the case of Abraham, killing your first born son.

The short of it being, you're doing these things because of your faith that God will guide you to what you need regardless of the path of how to get there.

Also don't fail to neglect who Martin Luther was working against (the church in Rome). I wouldn't fault the man who being overzealous in the face of the power the Catholic Church had at that time.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Nacho - 12-11-2017 09:45 PM

TheBeast1 I think the problem lays at the feet of 'western' Christianity, where everything needs to be dissected into an a+b=c formula. As we say in the east, some things are better left a mystery.

The Orthodox would look at the faith vs. works debate as a faulty premise to begin with. Think along the lines that the two components as being inseparable from each other.

The Protestants come up with this silly notion of sola fide (faith alone), but yet you will find scant evidence pertaining to such in scripture. The bible never mentions 'faith alone' anywhere, it's a twisting of scripture in order to fit a preconceived theological belief system (calvinism).

It's ironic Martin Luther never looked eastward, he would have found the in-tact original faith in the eastern half of the church. Instead he went with wild tangents in trying to reinvent the wheel.

As for your example above with Abraham, there is no contradiction. All christians believe we act on faith from God. It's ultimately by the grace of God we are all saved.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - The Beast1 - 12-11-2017 10:49 PM

(12-11-2017 09:45 PM)Nacho Wrote:  TheBeast1 I think the problem lays at the feet of 'western' Christianity, where everything needs to be dissected into an a+b=c formula. As we say in the east, some things are better left a mystery.

I feel you on that Nacho, but you have to look at the culture that lead to the reformation. Do you really think a bunch of Germans were going to be satisfied with such an answer?

(12-11-2017 09:45 PM)Nacho Wrote:  The Orthodox would look at the faith vs. works debate as a faulty premise to begin with. Think along the lines that the two components as being inseparable from each other.

The Protestants come up with this silly notion of sola fide (faith alone), but yet you will find scant evidence pertaining to such in scripture. The bible never mentions 'faith alone' anywhere, it's a twisting of scripture in order to fit a preconceived theological belief system (calvinism).

Being pedantic, but it was the Lutherans who came up with Sola Fide. The Calvinists came later.

I had a great read that my pastor gave me from my confirmation that summed up the arguments for Sola Fide. Instead of typing it up however, the wikipedia entry sums it up sufficiently. Worth a read, because of the historical background into the:

Quote:Justification in Lutheranism[edit]
From 1510 to 1520, Luther lectured on the Psalms and the books of Hebrews, Romans, and Galatians. As he studied these portions of the Bible, he came to view the use of terms such as penance and righteousness by the Roman Catholic Church in new ways. (See Romans 4:1-5, Galatians 3:1-7, and Genesis 15:6.) He became convinced that the church was corrupt in its ways and had lost sight of what he saw as several of the central truths of Christianity, the most important of which, for Luther, was the doctrine of justification—God's act of declaring a sinner righteous—by faith alone through God's grace. He began to teach that salvation or redemption is a gift of God's grace, attainable only through faith in Jesus.[1]

"This one and firm rock, which we call the doctrine of justification," insisted Martin Luther, "is the chief article of the whole Christian doctrine, which comprehends the understanding of all godliness."[2] He also called this doctrine the articulus stantis et cadentis ecclesiae ("article of the standing and falling of the church"): "…if this article stands, the Church stands; if it falls, the Church falls."[3] Lutherans follow Luther in this when they call this doctrine "the material principle" of theology in relation to the Bible, which is "the formal principle."[4] They believe justification by grace alone through faith alone in Christ's righteousness alone is the gospel, the core of the Christian faith around which all other Christian doctrines are centered and based.

Luther came to understand justification as entirely the work of God. When God's righteousness is mentioned in the gospel, it is God's action of declaring righteous the unrighteous sinner who has faith in Jesus Christ.[5] The righteousness by which the person is justified (declared righteous) is not his own (theologically, proper righteousness) but that of another, Christ (alien righteousness). "That is why faith alone makes someone just and fulfills the law," said Luther. "Faith is that which brings the Holy Spirit through the merits of Christ."[6] Thus faith, for Luther, is a gift from God, and "...a living, bold trust in God's grace, so certain of God's favor that it would risk death a thousand times trusting in it."[7] This faith grasps Christ's righteousness and appropriates it for the believer. He explained his concept of "justification" in the Smalcald Articles:

The first and chief article is this: Jesus Christ, our God and Lord, died for our sins and was raised again for our justification (Romans 3:24-25). He alone is the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world (John 1:29), and God has laid on Him the iniquity of us all (Isaiah 53:6). All have sinned and are justified freely, without their own works and merits, by His grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, in His blood (Romans 3:23-25). This is necessary to believe. This cannot be otherwise acquired or grasped by any work, law or merit. Therefore, it is clear and certain that this faith alone justifies us ... Nothing of this article can be yielded or surrendered, even though heaven and earth and everything else falls (Mark 13:31).[8]

Traditionally, Lutherans have taught forensic (or legal) justification, a divine verdict of acquittal pronounced on the believing sinner. God declares the sinner to be "not guilty" because Christ has taken his place, living a perfect life according to God's law and suffering for his sins. For Lutherans, justification is in no way dependent upon the thoughts, words, and deeds of those justified through faith alone in Christ. The new obedience that the justified sinner renders to God through sanctification follows justification as a consequence, but is not part of justification.[9]

Lutherans believe that individuals receive this gift of salvation through faith alone.[10] Saving faith is the knowledge of,[11] acceptance of,[12] and trust[13] in the promise of the Gospel.[14] Even faith itself is seen as a gift of God, created in the hearts of Christians[15] by the work of the Holy Spirit through the Word[16] and Baptism.[17] Faith is seen as an instrument that receives the gift of salvation, not something that causes salvation.[18] Thus, Lutherans reject the "decision theology" which is common among modern evangelicals.

For Lutherans, justification provides the power by which Christians can grow in holiness. Such improvement comes about in the believer only after he has become a new creation in Christ through Holy Baptism. This improvement is not completed in this life: Christians are always "saint and sinner at the same time" (simul iustus et peccator)[19]—saints because they are holy in God's eyes, for Christ's sake, and do works that please him; sinners because they continue to sin until death.

Epistle of James[edit]
Lutheran Confessions reject the Catholic position that the Epistle of James contradicts the Lutheran teaching on Justification.[20][21] They interpret the verses in James 2: "we are justified/declared righteous by people when they see the good works we do as a result of our faith and they conclude that our faith is sincere."[22] They conclude:

Paul is writing to people who said that faith in Jesus alone does not save a person, but one has to also obey God's law in order to be justified (Gal 3:3, 5:4). To counter the false idea that what we do in keeping the law must be added to faith in what Christ did for us. Paul often emphasizes in his letters (esp. Galatians, Romans, Colossians) that we are saved by grace through faith alone. James is writing to people who felt that believing in Jesus saved a person, but that having faith did not mean that a person necessarily would keep God's commandments out of love for God (James 2:14, 17). To show that faith is not really faith unless it leads a person to thank God for salvation in a life of glad and willing obedience to God's holy will. James emphasized that a faith which did not show that it was living faith was really not faith at all.[23]

A Lutheran exegesis further points out that James is simply reaffirming Jesus' teaching in Matthew 7:16 regarding works as a fruit of salvation, instead of a cause,[24] and that in the tenth verse of the same chapter, James too denies works as a means to obtain forgiveness:

James here (verse 10) also shoots down the false doctrine of work-righteousness. The only way to be free of sin is to keep the law perfectly and in its entirety. If we offend it in the slightest, tiniest little way, we are guilty of all. Thank God that He sent Jesus to fulfill the Law in its entirety for us[25]


(12-11-2017 09:45 PM)Nacho Wrote:  It's ironic Martin Luther never looked eastward, he would have found the in-tact original faith in the eastern half of the church. Instead he went with wild tangents in trying to reinvent the wheel.

You'd be surprised. Marty was in fact very familiar with the orthodox church and held you guys in high esteem. Remember that Martin Luther and his compatriots were living in a time where the ruling establishment was very intertwined with the Catholic church. The reformation was really in its essence an effort to overthrow the power of the Catholic Church.

A fun look at the history: http://www.christianitytoday.com/history/2008/august/what-did-reformers-think-about-eastern-orthodox-church.html

Quote:What was the attitude of the reformers (Martin Luther in particular) toward the Eastern Orthodox Church? Was the idea of becoming part of the Eastern church entertained?

Luther was generally positive toward the Eastern Orthodox church, especially because it rejected many of the things he most disliked about the Roman Catholic church: clerical celibacy, papal supremacy, purgatory, indulgences, and Communion by bread alone. He frequently referred to the beliefs and practices of the "Greek church," as he called it, as evidence that Catholics had deviated from principles upon which Christians formerly agreed.

Luther never attempted to build a bridge to the Eastern church, but some of his followers did. Philipp Melanchthon worked with Demetrios Mysos, a deacon sent by the patriarch of Constantinople to find out about the new religious movement in Germany, to complete a Greek translation/paraphrase of the Augsburg Confession, called the Augustana Graeca. Mysos was supposed to take the document back to Constantinople, but he died on the journey.

Some Lutheran theologians at Tubingen tried to establish an even closer connection. The "Eastern Orthodoxy" entry in The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation, edited by Hans J. Hillerbrand, reports:

The Lutherans were convinced that they, rather than Rome, were the true apostolic and catholic church, and thus to establish contact with the venerable Greek church, to enlist its support against the papacy, and perhaps even to enter into communion with this apostolic church would have been a sensational victory. Thus in 1575 they sent the Augustana Graeca to Patriarch Jeremias II (d. 1595), asking his opinion. There ensued over the next six years a friendly but candid exchange of extensive doctrinal correspondence (three letters from both sides totaling over four hundred printed pages). Prominent topics discussed included the authority of scripture and tradition; the filioque; the nature of the church; grace, free will, and synergism; justification, faith, and good works; eucharistic practices; the priesthood and the ministry; prayers for the departed; the invocation of saints; feasts and fasting; and monasticism. Except for those doctrines and customs of the Roman church that the East had never accepted, the changes in church teaching and polity advocated by the Lutherans were rejected by the Orthodox, who thus implicitly agreed on most issues with the Catholics.

(12-11-2017 09:45 PM)Nacho Wrote:  As for your example above with Abraham, there is no contradiction. All christians believe we act on faith from God. It's ultimately by the grace of God we are all saved.

I think we're beating around the bush here.

What I like a ton about Christianity is a common linking message that unites many different people under a common banner of salvation. The cornucopia of Christian denominations are really different in the most inconsequential of ways. At the end of the day, we all believe that Jesus is the path to salvation and that is what unites us.

If you feel a connection to the cultural traditions of the orthodox service, by all means, keep at it. I had a great time sitting in on a service at the Kykkos Monastery in Cyprus.

The church is really a liquid that changes shape depending on its cultural vessel.


RE: Orthodox Conversion - Sisyphus - 12-11-2017 11:56 PM

The conversion process was covered in detail in this educational program