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Working as an employee - sterlingarcher - 08-16-2019 11:54 AM

I just got fired from my job... again.

In fact, it's made me realize that I've never NOT been fired.

I think that's actually, literally true.

I just can't get past the fact that I'm being exploited.

It's ridiculous.

This last one was kinda a trial...

And after several years of not working in an office, having to check in at 9:00, pretending to be busy 'til 5:00, I just couldn't hack it.

This company turns over $20 MILLION.

There are seven people in the office, two partners, and 5 employees (not one making over $60K).

What gives?

Am I the idiot, or are they?


RE: Working as an employee. - PapayaTapper - 08-16-2019 12:21 PM

Fear vs Desire (Every. Single. Thing.)

Risk vs Reward

Starting a business is hard. Growing it successfully is even harder. It requires work, sacrifice, dedication, passion,...even obsession.

All with no guarantee of success

Risk vs Reward

An employee stepping into an established business takes no risk. That employee is voluntarily entering an agreement with established terms.

(This much time and effort / this much $ in return)... aka: A Steady Paycheck

Dont resent the employer for offering what you accepted. Youre choosing the safety of the steady paycheck

Do start your own business.

Its never been easier. There are waaaaaaay more resources available to aspiring entrepreneurs in terms of information and capital than ever before.

But are you willing to invest in yourself ?

Are you willing to work your ass off to build something without a guarantee that you will succeed?

You obviously have the "Desire" hence your resentment at creating more wealth /equity for others.

The question is does that desire exceed your "fear" of risking what it takes to succeed.

Fear vs Desire

Risk vs Reward

You have to decide ...and no decision is a decision



RE: Working as an employee - Ice - 08-16-2019 03:43 PM

Sorry man, but to me this sounds like whining.

You are not being exploited - they're paying you what the market demands. If you were really that valuable to them because of your skills, they would pay you more. Also, you accepted the job for the salary they offered, so it was your decision to take that job.

The fact that you have to be in the office 9-5 even when there's not much to do surely sucks though.

The fact that the company turns over $20 million is completely irrelevant. Apart from that you don't know how much of that is really profit. They are simply paying you a wage that is agreed upon in the market for such a role. Not more not less. There is no reason why they should give you a share of the profit unless you're performing a key function. Sales/ new business development would be such a case, but in these roles a bonus system is the norm anyway.

You can just either look for a new job, learn a new skill that pays more, or start your own business.



(08-16-2019 11:54 AM)sterlingarcher Wrote:  I just got fired from my job... again.

In fact, it's made me realize that I've never NOT been fired.

I think that's actually, literally true.

I just can't get past the fact that I'm being exploited.

It's ridiculous.

This last one was kinda a trial...

And after several years of not working in an office, having to check in at 9:00, pretending to be busy 'til 5:00, I just couldn't hack it.

This company turns over $20 MILLION.

There are seven people in the office, two partners, and 5 employees (not one making over $60K).

What gives?

Am I the idiot, or are they?



RE: Working as an employee - sterlingarcher - 08-17-2019 11:58 AM

You're both right.

I just wonder if 90% of people even think this way.

I don't understand how anyone can work for Coca-Cola for example, for $60K per year of stress, so two old men can sit on $150bn.

Ask anyone who owns the company they work for, and most people have no clue.


RE: Working as an employee - roberto - 08-17-2019 02:32 PM

(08-17-2019 11:58 AM)sterlingarcher Wrote:  I don't understand how anyone can work for Coca-Cola for example, for $60K per year of stress, so two old men can sit on $150bn.

It's easy. It's because they don't have the balls to try to be the next Coca-Cola.

I know that's extremely unlikely But to quote a tired motivational cliche; if you shoot for the stars and end up on the moon, that's still a win compared to most people.

Dont feel too bad. We need people like you. To make people like me money Big Grin

Just kidding man. Take a shot at running your own show.


RE: Working as an employee - texas - 08-17-2019 06:49 PM

(08-16-2019 11:54 AM)sterlingarcher Wrote:  This company turns over $20 MILLION.

There are seven people in the office, two partners, and 5 employees (not one making over $60K).

How much did they have to spend to generate the 20M revenue?
Of the seven employees, do all of them bring equal value to the table?
With the skills the ones who are being paid 60k have, are they able to make more somewhere else?

Imagine you have a small engineering firm with four people total where two are there to do administrative tasks like answer phones, scheduling, invoicing with the other two are doing the specialized functions such as surveying, platting, feasability studies, hydrologic studies, etc.

Which of the two groups would be harder to replace?
Which ones do the tasks that actually generate the revenue for the company?
Should they all be paid the same?

(08-16-2019 11:54 AM)sterlingarcher Wrote:  I don't understand how anyone can work for Coca-Cola for example, for $60K per year of stress, so two old men can sit on $150bn.

Ask anyone who owns the company they work for, and most people have no clue.

How do you know they are stressed?
Does it matter what two old men do with their money?
What would change in the employees' minds if they knew who owned the company?
How is that relevant to anything?

Like the other business owners have said, it takes balls to start a business. Many people would have no fucking clue how to make money on their own if a job did not already exist for them where they could just plug in and NPC their life away. Employers provide a service for their employees. They offer structure, security, and stability in exchange for their time and some level of effort. The employee is shielded from the downside and does not have to worry about various risks (lack of funding, theft, lawsuits, competitors, employee issues, losses, etc) and can unplug once they're off the clock. An employer is exposed to those risks constantly regardless of if they are on the clock or not. Many employers lose sleep over that shit constantly.

A good exercise would be to try to start some sort of small operation and learn about all that goes into the setup and infrastructure of a business. After a while, you will know if it is for you or not and having gone through the process will likely make you a better employee and appreciate your employer more if you decide it's not for you. It will definitely have an impact on the way you view money and wages.


RE: Working as an employee - sterlingarcher - 08-18-2019 05:48 AM

[/quote]

How do you know they are stressed?
Does it matter what two old men do with their money?
What would change in the employees' minds if they knew who owned the company?
How is that relevant to anything?

[/quote]

Stressed or depressed, odds on.

Who cares what they DO with their money. I'm talking about the gross disparity.

So far as I'm aware Warren Buffet didn't start coca-cola, and Charlie Munger advocates 'sit on your ass investing'.

Of course investors and entrepreneurs should profit, but by such degree?

I just don't understand how people can suck that up, unless they just don't think about it.

What would change? Apparently they'd have started using it.

It's relevant because if EVERYONE started thinking, surely people would just be like (in concerto) 'Annnnd fuck it!'

You're all right though.


RE: Working as an employee - PapayaTapper - 08-18-2019 11:15 AM

(08-18-2019 05:48 AM)sterlingarcher Wrote:  Who cares what they DO with their money. I'm talking about the gross disparity.

Of course investors and entrepreneurs should profit, but by such degree?

It's relevant because if EVERYONE started thinking, surely people would just be like (in concerto) 'Annnnd fuck it!'

They have and theyre called socialists / communists


RE: Working as an employee - MustafaJoMama - 08-19-2019 08:42 PM

There's no exploitation going on in any voluntary employment relationship. That's a Marxist trope.

What you get paid is usually a reflection of how many other people are willing and capable of doing the job you're being paid to do (supply and demand of labor). A business isn't a charity and they are not going to pay you more than the market dictates if they want to stay in business for very long.

As others have said, the employer is offering you steady pay (and likely benefits) in exchange for you doing delivering on expectations that should have been clear up front. Either the employer or the employee can seek to clarify those expectations at any time and that often happens several times before you're terminated.

I don't own my own business, but I do hire and fire people and I am amazed at how often I have to explain these concepts. I guess schools gave up on helping people become successful and just teach social justice full time.


RE: Working as an employee - SilentOne - 08-19-2019 10:17 PM

(08-19-2019 08:42 PM)MustafaJoMama Wrote:  I don't own my own business, but I do hire and fire people and I am amazed at how often I have to explain these concepts. I guess schools gave up on helping people become successful and just teach social justice full time.

Let's be real, school doesn't teach people how to be successful. It wasn't designed to do that. It's all about getting the masses to be enslaved with debt and giving out endless amounts of useless degrees. These degrees could be put to better use as toilet paper.