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Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
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Roosh Offline
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Post: #1
Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Will go in this thread

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02-27-2013 08:10 PM
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Teedub Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
OK, waiting for the review copy bro.

Will put on Amazon once read.

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(This post was last modified: 02-27-2013 08:31 PM by Teedub.)
02-27-2013 08:22 PM
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Hades Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Can I get a review copy?
02-27-2013 08:32 PM
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Moma Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
me toooo

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02-27-2013 08:44 PM
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thegmanifesto Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Shoot me one too Roosh.

I have been waiting for a book a la Dead Bat.

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02-27-2013 09:01 PM
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Alpha Hunter Zero Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Still waiting for mine too. Are you sending out copies to everyone who shows interest or do you only have a set number in mind?
02-27-2013 09:15 PM
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Avarence Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Also interested.
I haven't been paying attention though, so if I missed a deadline or something don't bother.
02-27-2013 09:21 PM
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jasond Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
An entertaining, but somber look at life back in America

After reading Roosh's memoir about his month back in America, I am filled with mixed emotions. Happiness that Roosh can escape the pain of dealing with American women by going back to Europe. Yet also a profound sadness of what American gender relations has degraded to, and what so many men (including myself) that have never been overseas must go through.

The sausagefests, fatties, bitch shields and entitlement mentality of the typical American girl. He observes (like myself) that it's actually harder to approach/open uglier girls in America, because they get hit on all the time, and try to act like a hot girl.

The anecdotes that Roosh mixes in makes for an entertaining, and humanizing read. He recaps the forum meeting in DC. He tells of the time he and his dad win big gambling in Atlantic City. His paranoia of which strangers know who he really is. His relationships with his Mom and sister really touch home. You can tell that Roosh loves them, but their disapproval of his lifestyle leads to many arguments. It's something that many red-pill men will be able to relate to--you'll never be able to logically convince female family members of what you do, yet it's too hard to cut them off completely because of past emotional bonds.

I would highly recommend this book for all readers. It's rare to get a detailed, entertaining, compare-and-contrast look at American nightlife and dating from someone who has spent years living around the world. Just be prepared afterwards to want to leave America more than ever.

Added bonus: Roosh explains how to get around the 90-day Schengen visa rules for Americans.


Couple of typos:

page 21: "I just said you don't have to say" should be "I just said you don't have to stay" (stay, not say)

page 50: "they assume you want to make fuck them" should not have the word "make"
02-28-2013 02:36 AM
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Kitsune Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
I've been somewhat apprehensive of Roosh's writings recently. Not because he's lost his ability to write, but because the ghost of 'moving on' has been following him. So when I read the introduction to "Why can't I use a smiley face?" I was a bit worried. After all, a major reason for my preferring Roosh to other writers is his dry wit and sarcastic approach to dealing with the mechanical nature of the game.

Opening with his leaving of Europe, I thought, "This better not be some melancholy recounting of how he's realising that girls are delicate and he needs to man up." Luckily, this is short-lived and Roosh pulls us back into ground zero - with princesses, the 'slut friend' and the over-the-top emotional out-pouring’s that we've all experienced from girls on nights out. The best part of this is that the voice we're reading is the voice we ignore for the sake of getting the girl. It's the irritation we wish we could express.

That's not to say it isn't a serious book. It's short, but it seems to be a culmination of Roosh dealing with the larger issues surrounding game: the weariness of it, the isolation and most importantly, what comes after it. I think that younger guys who follow Roosh's work probably think about these things a lot, and this book will make them anticipate what is coming next.
The best feature though is the feeling of impending escape: this book could be Bang DC, but unlike Bang the first time around, Roosh reminds us that all the hoop-jumping can be avoided - there are better places out there. As such, "Why Can't I Use a Smiley-Face?" is similar to the warm-fuzzy feeling you get when you wake from a nightmare and realise it wasn't real.
02-28-2013 07:01 AM
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Roosh Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
The first two reviews! Exciting.. Banana

Typos fixed. I really want to get this book out in 3 weeks from now.

Roosh
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02-28-2013 07:55 AM
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"

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02-28-2013 04:33 PM
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Teedub Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
As a huge Dead Bat fan I was eagerly awaiting this book. It's very short, I read it in an hour and a half roughly, but I was highly entertained.

--Spoilers below--

Roosh is aware Game has changed him, as evidenced by the "hovering above my body" story in the opening salvo of the book. He is capable of human emotion and connection, however he deems it as fleeting, and such is his abundance mentality, a new encounter never seems far away. In general, the book deals with this type of player-isolation, and the disaproval from loved ones such a lifestyle leads to. That said, it isn't a 'sad' book at all, the anecdotes about his dealings with American women are told in a rapid, fun and very readable way. Although I thought, whilst reading, his treatment of the cougar was a bit mean-spirited, in hindsight, I can't say I would have reacted differently - especially considering all the shit tests she put him through earlier in the 'relationship'...She certainly seemed to think it was one anyway!

His dalliance with the Spanish girl was an entertaining read, as was the way it is evidence for what we discuss on here about feminism, lack of commitment in modern dating etc. As was the she failed to rebut any of Roosh's points on how women have actually suffered under feminism in the guise of empowerment.

I don't want this to turn into a chapter by chapter description, so I'll leave out any more detailed specific instances. His gambling/bonding session with his Dad and certain issues surrounding that relationship was a humanising touch, and it is worth noting his relationship with his sister seems very different to the way described in Dead Bat - fascinating, and I suppose the ultimate conclusion of leading a truly red-pill lifestyle.

I won't say much, but I hope to be at the future proposed Europe meet up. [Roosh, is the soccer jersey you refer to the German national-team tracksuit top you wear in the book challenge vid?]

The most notable difference between Dead Bat Roosh, and this Roosh is his absolutely fearless responses to annoying women. There is a cold, zero tolerance attitude which is both impressive and something which only certain people could pull off I reckon.

All in all, a great read and a fitting, albeit short, sequel of sorts to Dead Bat. Hopefully Roosh sells enough copies of this and his other books so that more and more men approach him in clubs requesting pics...like he's Mystery or something. Wink

Finally, it has inspired me to change plans and make Eastern Europe my destination for 2014

Typos - "stay hi" p.22,
p.10 needs another " for the following “but I don’t want to argue. Let me go see where my friend is(")
p27 "make a border run one to another country

There were a few others, but they were pointed out by someone else earlier.

Cheers!

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02-28-2013 07:16 PM
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Walderschmidt Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
I read this book in little under an hour.

Edit: I realize I kind of rambled on my own thoughts more instead of the book. Happens when you drink. So my comment is divided into two sections: Commentary on the book and my thoughts:

Commentary on the book:

The book was a short, entertaining read that was easy to follow, and surprisingly, easy to relate to.

Roosh's almost feels like an epilogue to his game years, similar to how some PUA artists announce they must leave the community and move on. It feels like Roosh has grown tired. Where he used to be able to suppress his principles to get the bang, he finds it increasing difficult to do so, let alone find the effort even worth it anymore with the "classy" talent he encounters in D.C..

Dealing with his family is increasingly a chore he does not see eye-to-eye with them and in this month, it is almost painful how obvious it is. The arguments. The appeals to do as a mother wishes. I was pleasantly surprised how nice the father-son bonding time was and it was nice to learn a little back story on Roosh's father, to better see where Roosh is coming from (genetically too!).

I can't help but get the feeling that Roosh is tired of chasing women just to chase women, as if his life is missing something. I am intensely curious as to how it plays out because I feel as if I have found my dream and purpose, so getting good with women will take a back seat to the dream. I wonder how Roosh's game will change if he finds his dream or purpose and focuses on that instead of sleeping with woman.

Some More of My Thoughts:

While it was a good read, as Roosh's writing tends to be, some of the conclusions I have come to are disturbing.

I thought I was lucky in that my family does not seem to push back against my red pill views so much. Now I realize, there's nothing for them to really push back against. As far as they know, I am going into the military like a good little officer and then I plan to get married.

Anytime I offer hints of what comes afterward, that is to say, how I plan to permanently expatriate from America and never come back, they do push back. My own father, who is my biggest supporter in my newfound path of evolution in game, for all his intelligence, can't seem to fathom why I would want to permanently expatriate. I suppose I can't blame him, because he comes from the old guard, and is too busy supporting our family and being overseas to see the damage done to the U.S. as it stands today and what that means for me if I want a family of my own. The only time he understands are when I point out how he would move back to France in a heart beat if it weren't for my mother desiring to have a huge nest as home base near D.C.. I have not even tried to really tell my mother the scope of my plans and my sister I have resorted to just pissing her off for my own amusement as I believe there is no way I can really convince of my side or to shut up about her own. Or her boyfriend who unknowingly is on the side that would keep a vice on his nuts.

None of my best friends really understand my desires and I have not wasted time trying to make them. I've got six best friends who know six shades of me, instead of any friend know me in my entirety. That a red pill man from the manosphere seems to make more sense and understand me better than any of my best friends, if not my parents is a strange feeling indeed. I almost feel like my "2nd family" will become my primary family after I leave the military to embark on my plans, if I survive. And no, for the third time, I second guess my trajectory. Perhaps I should just make a run for it now, while I still can.

The saddest part, in my opinion, is how I agree with Roosh on American girls. The girls my age aren't such cunts like the 30 year old's he's been meeting. But the fastest way for a girl to lose my interest is to tell me she's American. I'll know right away that I already have the flag and probably no way to relate to her. I have not seen or done as much as Roosh and I already agree with his conclusions.

The writing is on the wall. I want to expatriate from the U.S.. If it weren't for my family, I don't think I'd ever want to come back. I would say I'm proud to be American, but the American I am proud of and the America of today are two different things.

The last thing I'll say is for men to watch out. America is good one for thing - honing your game if you can stomach the unpleasant hours you need to put in her. Roosh said that "Poland is a place where nice guys can still be rewarded with nice girls" and that even hardened players are drawn to such places. I do not have nearly as much experience with girls as guys here on the forum do, but do not confuse being a nice guy with getting a nice girl. I believe you can be a nicer guy and still get a nice girl. If you go back to being a nice girl, you'll set yourself up for oneitis and slowdeath as your relationship spirals to the end. Such was the set up of my last oneitis, which I used my best game, and when I let my guard down, some of my worst.

Wald

P.S. I'll make a more coherent review on my blog at a later date.
(This post was last modified: 02-28-2013 07:41 PM by Walderschmidt.)
02-28-2013 07:25 PM
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WestIndianArchie Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
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03-01-2013 12:11 AM
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Beyond Borders Away
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Just got done reading the book.

I picked it up before bed, thinking I'd read just a small bit of it before crashing out. I was about halfway through and set it down to get some sleep, but then it kept nagging at me so I picked it up again and finished the rest. I say "nagging at me" because it wasn't like it was the most captivating book in the world, but I felt like it touched me on a real emotional level in a lot of ways (no homo), so I had to put those thoughts at ease by finishing.

Maybe it's because I've struggled with a lot of the same emotions and challenges Roosh talks about over my last year of being home in the states. In fact, I think a lot of the issues touched on are things that have been in my mind over the past couple weeks.

I also found my spirits lifted in some of the brighter moments, even smiling a little; Roosh has a great ability for getting readers involved in his story. I especially appreciated how his camaraderie with the other forum members seemed to balance him. Makes me want to meet more like-minded guys.

On another note, I've noticed that in a lot of Roosh's more recent writings, he seems to float back and forth between wanting to settle in a little bit, maybe even questioning his beliefs about women, and just embracing the momentum he's already built in his life. I think this is something a lot of us struggle with. He doesn't overdo it or give the red pill back; he just acknowledges its presence.

To be perfectly honest, I felt like some of the play-by-play in the nightclub chapters was a little too drawn out and that some of the "angry" banter Roosh had with women seemed pretty trivial in nature. Then again, I think a lot of the guys who read the PUA stuff enjoy this play-by-play type writing, so I'd say it fits that side of the audience. And while the personality revealed in some of these interactions may have rubbed me a bit wrong, one of my favorite aspects of any Roosh writing is the way he lays it all out there to be seen, warts and all.

He doesn't sugarcoat something just because it might put himself in an awkward or less than favorable light. I always respect this type of honesty in a writer, and revealing the true subtleties of human nature makes for a more interesting, believable read and commentary on the lifestyle we've chosen.

In conclusion, I liked this homecoming story and will probably give it another go. Coming home to suddenly feel like an outsider can sometimes wear on you and leave you wondering if perhaps it's you that has become flawed. Just knowing others experience the exact same thing is reassuring and offers a reminder that we aren't all born into a place that's right for us.

For some of us, there's just no going back once we've embraced the international lifestyle (much like taking a red pill of any other hue). It's a scary, somewhat alienating feeling, but you just have to keep searching for whatever it is you're looking for. Even if it never reveals itself, sitting home probably wouldn't have made you any happier, and at least you reach the end-game knowing you gave it a shot, which is far more than most people can say.

I hope you find what you're looking for, Roosh. Thanks for another good read.

"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe.
To be your own man is a hard business. If you try it, you'll be lonely often, and sometimes
frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself." - Kipling
(This post was last modified: 03-01-2013 05:29 AM by Beyond Borders.)
03-01-2013 05:20 AM
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Vicious Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
You can't go back home to your family, back home to your childhood ... back home to a young man's dreams of glory and of fame ... back home to places in the country, back home to the old forms and systems of things which once seemed everlasting but which are changing all the time – back home to the escapes of Time and Memory.

It would be a disservice to not quote the character of George Webber from Thomas Wolfe’s Magnum Opus You can’t go home again in a review of Roosh’s newest publication Why can’t I use a smiley face? [WCIUASF]. The experiences by the fictional character of George and Roosh are striking in their feeling over social alienation as both return home after having immersed themselves in different cultures and in behaviours that others consider deviating. Half way through the memoir (at 60 pages it can not really be called a book) I found myself think “wow, this is a depressing read”. Sure enough, a couple of pages later the author mentions how re-familiarizing himself with his home city made him suffer from a slight depression. This sense of melancholy is vividly transferred throughout the story.

There’s not much to take away with regard to game from WCIUASF. While the book details a number of encounters with women in Washington DC and the bedding of one, the retelling of these escapades leaves you with distaste rather than motivation to go out and do the same. Roosh is either a magnet for drunk, obnoxious and entitled women or DC is certainly deserving of its reputation. This still makes for fascinating reading. One of the biggest credibility gaps many PUAs suffer from are their “lay reports” where their retold conversations reads like something from a Hollywood script. Roosh’s conversation are raw, at times not actually going anywhere but always giving a feel of authenticity.

Reading WCIUASF can feel a bit like chewing on glass at times in its depiction of male/female interactions. Roosh certainly takes a combative approach a number of times in the book that definitely doesn’t do much to de-escalate the sometimes volatile situations he ends up in. A man of principles, who clearly doesn’t believe in giving approval only for the sake of furthering his own interest. I mentioned this as well in my review of Don’t Bang Denmark. It becomes clear that this is not an individual disillusioned with his native country because he has not found his way, but rather because he has found his way and sticking to it when the surroundings lambast him for even trying.

WCIUASF is definitely not for everyone. There’s no background to why the author is where he is at other than a few brief explanations. The work pretty much assumes the reader is familiar with Roosh’s work and writings. Anyone who has ever doubted their place in society will however quickly relate to the sense of exasperation conveyed throughout the narrative. At one point in the book Roosh mentions how he almost has a flow chart for western women in his head of responses he can go through to get to the bang. What joy is there left in the interaction when you’ve reached this point?
03-01-2013 02:09 PM
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scorpion Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Roosh's Why Can't I Use A Smiley Face? is an enjoyable read that chronicles his thoughts and experiences upon returning to the United States following two years of living abroad in Europe.

From the beginning it's clear that this is a more reflective, personal work than the Bang guides he has been pumping out regularly for the past few years, which detail the precise methodology he utilizes to meet and seduce foreign women (whom he has also been pumping out regularly for the past few years).

In this book, however, Roosh's focus shifts from the external to the internal. This is more of a memoir that documents the way that the game has shaped the man that Roosh has become. This is most apparent in his interactions with his family, who struggle to come to terms with the nomadic, player lifestyle he has chosen.

There are also a number of entertaining stories about Roosh's forays into the D.C. nightlife (which lives up to its abysmal reputation) with cameos by Virgle Kent, The Rookie, and at one point the RVF meetup crew.

This portion of the book could have easily been titled "Don't Bang D.C.", because story after story reinforces the commonly held wisdom that American women are going down the tubes. There's a particularly amusing encounter with an overly-eager cougar that I won't spoil, but which was both funny and perfectly emblematic of both the power of game and the abysmal attitudes of entitled American women. On one night out, Roosh finds himself looking around a crowded bar, and summarizes the experience of many men who attempt to night game these days but find the talent sorely lacking:

Roosh Wrote:I saw some opportunities with 6s who had thick arms. They’re the type of girl that causes you to rub your chin for a couple seconds, squint your eyes, and ask yourself, “Do I really want to bang that?” While thinking about it, you subconsciously hope she walks away so you won’t have to act.

The book takes its title from an experience Roosh has with a D.C. girl he has a one-night-stand with, whose behavior is depressingly on par with the stereotypical liberated, young American feminist. As he is leaving the girl's apartment following the bang, he decides to write down his email address for her, then pauses and wonders whether or not he should cap it off with smiley face.

By the end of the book I realized that the title also served as Roosh's metaphorical lament on the awful state of American women when contrasted with his direct experience of Eastern European women. Why can't I behave like a pleasant gentleman toward you? Why can't I actually treat you with kindness and respect? Why must you be so needlessly hostile and bitchy? Why can't I use a smiley face?

In this book we clearly see a Roosh who has traveled far and wide, and who upon returning home has fully realized what he has gained (and what he has lost). His travels have transformed him. He is no longer the idealistic seeker, traversing the globe on a mission to unlock the true nature of women. He no longer defines his worth as a man solely by his ability to bed women. His holy grail has been discovered. That inner void has been filled. This Roosh is older and wiser, more self-aware, more confident in his masculinity and more cognizant of his inner need to pursue the next great challenge. It is clear he is beyond the Bang at this point, and has nothing left to prove to himself or others regarding his ability to pick up women.

The book ends with Roosh's departure from D.C. and a (somewhat, but not really) shocking resolution for his future.

Overall I enjoyed the book, and am interested to see where Roosh goes from here with his future work. He seems to be at a crossroads of sort, but judging by Why Cant I Use A Smiley Face?, he has a lot more to offer than just his Bang guides, and I expect he is just getting started.

"For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.” - Romans 8:18
03-01-2013 02:51 PM
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Lucky Offline
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Post: #18
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
The book starts off with Roosh explaining the feelings that go along with visiting family and friends after being away for so long. I have a job where I am also only able to visit my home city only a couple of times a year at most and I can heavily identify with everything he says about thinking how exciting things will be and realizing that nothing really changes; the anticipation before the visit and the vague feeling of disillusionment that comes after only a couple of days. There is also a chapter about the forum meet up back in October. I was unable to make it but if there is ever one in Europe I will definitely go, it sounds like it was a great time.

It was very entertaining and interesting to read Roosh's observations about American culture, women, and the nightlife. I nodded with recognition at the passages noting how Americans like to impress strangers but when they aren't talking about themselves they block out the world with their iPhones and earbuds. It also made me realize how much I hated the phrase "really?" that girls like to throw out and I now appreciate that I don't have to hear it nearly as much living here. I was a bit surprised at the number of times he had to deal with unprovoked violence from drunken women in only a month's time. I consider myself an "advanced beginner" in the game and I can recall several instances of girls behaving in this manner when I lived in the States (I've been slapped a couple times) but never with the aggression of the girls Roosh encounters.


The title of this book is perfect. It encapsulates the strange standards American women have developed about intimacy. How is it possible that a man can have sex with a woman and afterward still have to be careful about showing too much interest? Get this book, that story alone is worth it. I am planning a trip to visit the States later this year and this book has actually affected my plans. Originally I was planning on staying for a month but I have now decided to cut it down to 2 weeks and spend another 2 weeks traveling Europe. Overall a great short book; honest, entertaining, and interesting.
03-01-2013 04:21 PM
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Smitty Offline
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RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
I've spent years living and working in the DC area so everything he writes in this book really resonates with me - from the interactions with women, the venues, to the logistical problems of not having your own place. There were several times while I was reading the book that I actually felt relieved with a feeling of "Fuck me, thank God Roosh had that same experience. It's not just me after all." So it was actually good to read about one of the jedi kngihts of game having a rough time in DC. (especially the one night stand experience in which the table was turned on him).

Roosh is a smart guy and he has interesting and often contrarian perspectives on many topics outside of game. When I read his material - books, blog or forum posts - I expect to be enlightened or learn something new. This book won't enlighten you or teach you something groundbreaking, but that's not its purpose. It was written very much like a diary or journal. Consider it a window into his life for a month (especially the insight into the relationship with his parents and sister). A sort of lighter version of Dead Bat (my favorite of his books). One thing I've always appreciated about Roosh's writings is that he doesn't hide the fact that he is human and has many of the same quirks and weird behaviors (hypochondria, etc) that a lot of us do. If you're interested in Roosh the person and not just Roosh the game master, then this book is worth reading. The bit of information about the Polish visa was easily worth a $15 book to me.

Roosh has been gracious to send me a few of his books in advance, but I've always bought the final release anyway to support him (and the cause). I'll definitely be buying this one as well and look forward to his next release.
03-01-2013 08:04 PM
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UnW Offline
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Post: #20
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Roosh's latest memoir "Why Can't I Use A Smiley Face?" details his month long return to his native USA after spending almost two years abroad.


Commencing with his last days in Europe, Roosh details his arrival to the US which is received with bittersweet emotions. His unconventional lifestyle which has lead him to travel a myriad of countries around the world has had left him with pitfalls with his friends and family back home. He elaborates his family's view on his unique lifestyle and the rift which has been created due to his extended periods of time away.

Throughout the book Roosh's honest explanations of his thought processes make it easy to comprehend his development as a person which has come with his worldly experiences. The unique experiences, entertaining stories and words of wisdom which are easy to notice throughout the book insinuate the learning which has occurred through the many years of traveling.

A common theme throughout the book is the juxtaposition between the culture and women which he encounters back in the US to what he has experience in Europe for the last two years. The overall negativity and discontent which Roosh explains about America would leave readers nodding in agreement. The materialistic culture, masculine attitudes, distant & cold personalities present in the women throughout the book make it easy to understand why Roosh has such a negative perception of American Women.

It's evident throughout the book that Roosh cannot fit in to the American culture anymore, the same culture which he grew up, is now met with disgust and displeasure. The book ends with no clear premonition of what Roosh will do in the future.

Overall, Roosh's latest work was entertaining, his dry sense of humour coupled with his clear and expressive writing style makes this book a pleasure to read.
(This post was last modified: 03-02-2013 02:54 AM by UnW.)
03-02-2013 02:52 AM
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Neo Offline
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Post: #21
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
I've read many of Roosh's books and I consider his memoir "Why Can't I Use A Smiley Face?" somewhat different. It chronicles Roosh's time when he comes back to America after living in Europe for nearly two years. As I read through it I got the impression that Roosh felt like a fish out of water coming back to the United States.

Most men living in the US will understand and relate to his story. We get to see the contrast of American vs European women through Roosh’s commentary. In the US he finds a surplus of cold and used up women…women who wasted their peak years going through guy after guy, only to find themselves desperate for any sort of companionship. While in Europe he finds women who truly just want a good guy to fall in love with. I couldn’t help but feel a weird sort of nostalgia as I read through some parts of the book, wondering about the types of women that Western society has lost.

You also get to see a more personal side of Roosh. We get a deeper look into his family’s reaction to his lifestyle. This was something that I read with great interest because my dad gave me the ‘why aren’t you getting married/you should settle down and have a family speech’ not too long ago. I know that since I’ve gotten into the game, I felt like I was growing apart from some of my close friends and family members. I’m sure this is common among guys in the forum.

Of course there’s game commentary about Roosh’s nights out with his friends and the forum crew. We get an inside look of the DC nightlife scene and the (unfortunate) types of women who frequent the different spots.

I recommend this book to forum members and men who want to live a traveling lifestyle. It’s not a game how to book (for that I’d recommend Bang, Day Bang, or 30 Bangs) but many guys will relate to Roosh’s experiences. A hidden benefit of reading the book is finding out you’re not alone if you want to find better women in different countries. A lot of us on the forum understand that, but some guys thinking of this type of lifestyle may not. They may be getting push back from their friends and end up quitting altogether. Throughout the book Roosh alludes to the fact that you really have to look deep inside yourself and figure out what makes you happy, no matter what anyone else thinks.
(This post was last modified: 03-02-2013 03:04 PM by Neo.)
03-02-2013 03:02 PM
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ColSpanker Offline
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Post: #22
Review of WHY CAN'T I USE A SMILEY FACE
Not sure where to put this one, so here goes. Master Roosh asked all of us whom he sent a copy of his latest work to give it a review.
WHY CAN'T I USE A SMILEY FACE is an account of Roosh's return to The USA after living abroad for a few years. It's not a long book-barely 60 pages- and can be read in one sitting. It is compelling; I had a hard time putting the book down. Some of his observations dig into you.
There are few accounts of his trips to the standard DC bars, but don't expect a list of his conquests. The Master has high standards and most American women (or men, for that matter) fall short. There are a few detailed accounts of his female encounters, but they seem to have been added as afterthoughts. Gotta give the boys something.
Mostly the book is a depressing reveal of his family relations. I never quite understood his origins, but Roosh's father comes from Persia and his mom Turkey. Think about that: two countries which are the West Virginia and California of the Middle East. OK, that may be a stretch, but you get the idea. His grandfather was a wealthy farmer in Persia who had four wives and 24 kids. Roosh Sr. made it to the USA, but chose to do so rather than becoming a prayer leader in Homs (my conjecture). If you ever get the feeling The Master has a tenuous hold to the country of his birth, this is the reason why. He even gives up on American in the last chapter.
So if you want some insight into Roosh's views on the manosphere, this might be a good place to start. Not a lot of depth, but a good quick read.

"We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately."
03-06-2013 07:20 PM
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DiogoFC Offline
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Post: #23
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
Good read. Your style is in perfect shape. If I was to change something, I wouldn't stop that story when PETRA found out about you. It's a normal trick for TV series, but I didn't find it enjoyable when reading.

Typo:

page 10, down at the bottom: "I starting painting strokes"

Congratulations!
03-07-2013 08:55 PM
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TheBulldozer Offline
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Post: #24
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
First off, thanks for the advance copy Roosh.

I feel like this book would seem half written without having read "A Dead Bat In Paraguay."

To understand the conclusion of the book, which I won't give away here, you need to understand where the seed for the author's ideas are planted. It's interesting to see the transformation from "Dead Bat" to "Smiley Face." From naive traveler, to hardened vagabond.

Many of the ideas you see in "Smiley Face" are unsurprising to those familiar with his work, but the narrative in which they're presented is different from his matter of fact writing prevalent on his blog.

Overall, it's a quick read that exposes the ridiculousness of American culture and the vapidity of its women. One sitting can knock it out.

Roosh, have you thought about selling "Dead Bat" and "Smiley Face" as sort of a package?
03-23-2013 02:49 PM
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Roosh Offline
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Post: #25
RE: Reviews of "Why can't I leave a smiley face?"
There will be a package of Dead Bat, Smiley Face, and 30 Bangs for $8 on launch weekend.

Roosh
http://www.rooshv.com
03-23-2013 03:12 PM
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