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Amazing Stories of Survival
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LeBeau Offline
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Amazing Stories of Survival
The will to survive can produce amazing stories out of complete disasters. Luck can also play a huge role, but regardless, many of these stories are still very inspirational.

Post up your favourites in this thread, here's a recent one to start off:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/06/1...0320130612

Quote:Nigerian cook survives 2 days under sea in shipwreck air bubble

Quote:Ship’s cook Okene, 29, was on board the Jascon-4 tugboat when it capsized on May 26 due to heavy Atlantic ocean swells around 30 km off the coast of Nigeria, while stabilizing an oil tanker filling up at a Chevron platform.

Of the 12 people on board, divers recovered 10 dead bodies while a remaining crew member has not been found.

Somehow Okene survived, breathing inside a four-foot high bubble of air as it shrunk in the waters slowly rising from the ceiling of the tiny toilet and adjoining bedroom where he sought refuge, until two South African divers eventually rescued him.

“I was there in the water in total darkness just thinking it’s the end. I kept thinking the water was going to fill up the room but it did not,” Okene said, parts of his skin peeling away after days soaking in the salt water.
06-14-2013 02:54 AM
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LeBeau Offline
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RE: Amazing Stories of Survival
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juliane_Koepcke

Quote:Juliane Diller (born 10 October 1954 in Lima as Juliane Margaret Koepcke) is a German biologist, born in Peru to German emigrants who is best known for being the sole survivor of 93 passengers and crew in the 24 December 1971, crash of LANSA Flight 508 (a LANSA Lockheed Electra OB-R-941 commercial airliner) in the Peruvian rainforest. After her airliner broke up in midair, she survived after falling about 3 km (~10,000 feet) still strapped to her airliner seat, before the seat crashed through the rainforest canopy and came to rest on the forest floor.

Quote:Juliane Koepcke was a German Peruvian high school senior student studying in Lima, intending to become a zoologist, like her parents. She and her mother, ornithologist Maria Koepcke, were traveling to meet with her father, biologist Hans-Wilhelm Koepcke,[1] who was working in the city of Pucallpa.

The airplane was struck by lightning during a severe thunderstorm and broke up in mid-air, disintegrating at 3.2 km (10,000 ft). Koepcke, who was seventeen years old at the time, fell to earth still strapped into her seat. She survived the fall with only a broken collarbone, a gash to her right arm, and her right eye swollen shut.[2] "I was definitely strapped in [the airplane seat] when I fell," she remembered. "It must have turned and buffered the crash, otherwise I wouldn't have survived."[3]

Her first priority was to find her mother, who had been seated next to her on the plane but her search was unsuccessful. With her eyeglasses lost and one eye swollen shut, she struggled to no avail. She later found out her mother had initially survived the crash as well, but died several days later due to her injuries.[4]

Koepcke found some sweets which were to become her only food on her trip. After looking for her mother and other passengers, she was soon able to locate a small stream. She then waded through knee-high water downstream from her landing site, relying on the survival principle her father had taught her, that tracking downstream should eventually lead to civilization.[2] The stream also provided clean water and a natural path through the dense rainforest vegetation.

During the trip, Koepcke couldn't sleep at night due to numerous insect bites, which became infected. After nine days, several spent floating downstream, she found a boat moored near a shelter, where she found the boat's motor and fuel tank. Relying again on her father's advice, Koepcke poured gasoline on her wounds, which managed to extract thirty five maggots from one arm,[5] then waited until rescuers arrived. She later recounted her necessary efforts that day: "I remember having seen my father when he cured a dog of worms in the jungle with gasoline. I got some gasoline and poured it on myself. I counted the worms when they started to slip out. There were 40 on my arm. I remained there but I wanted to leave. I didn't want to take the boat because I didn't want to steal it."[5]

Hours later, the lumbermen who used the shelter arrived and tended to her injuries and bug infestations. The next morning they took her via a seven-hour canoe ride down the river to a lumber station in the Tournavista District. With the help of a local pilot, she was airlifted to a hospital – and her waiting father – in Pucallpa.
07-29-2013 10:35 PM
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RE: Amazing Stories of Survival
I got one!

One of my friends and I survived the infamous dfw blizzard of 2010 . AFTER NEARLY SIDESWIPING A FIRE TRUCK, GRINDING DOWN A MEDIAN, SHREDDING MY UNDERCARRIAGE - SOMEWAY SOMEHOW- we drove 20 miles back to my apartment with my car overheating and leaking antifreeze. Nearly totaled that thing but insurance covered it(I may or may not have fibbed to them about actually what happened) but I was wearing loafers without socks. It was cold as fuck.
(This post was last modified: 07-29-2013 11:14 PM by Kickb.)
07-29-2013 11:12 PM
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