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Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
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TheKantian Offline
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Post: #76
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(07-21-2013 12:57 AM)Nemencine Wrote:  Take the half-full vs half-empty.

Condition A: Half full means that the cup was full(at 100% of water)..then we drain the cup to 50% water. correct?

Condition B: Half empty means that the Cup was at empty(at 100% of emptiness) then we fill the cup to 50%(with water.)
No. I wouldn't say draining or filling has anything to do with half full or half empty.

I really don't think these are puzzles or problems at all. I mean it's no more of a "puzzle" than half clothed or half naked is.
07-22-2013 02:06 PM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #77
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
That reminds me of a favourite quote.

What is the difference between being naked and being nude?

Being naked is when you are wearing no clothes and are alone.

Being nude is when you are wearing no clothes and someone is watching.
(This post was last modified: 07-22-2013 06:50 PM by cardguy.)
07-22-2013 06:50 PM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #78
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
A couple of things.

Aristotle is very dry to read - and seems like quite a poor writer. But this is incorrect. Apparently none of his original writings still exist - and what remains are just notes that his students made. And it was said that the original writings of Aristotle were more beautiful than Plato and like 'rivers of gold'.

I am not sure how Aristotle's work got lost - since I have yet to study the history of Greek thought and how it was rediscovered in the Renaissance. But - to give one example - if the Library of Alexandria hadn't being burned down - then they they would have survived (along with many other scholary treasures).

Secondly - for those interested in Plato. You should be aware that Plato's most important teachings (his 'unwritten doctrines') were never recorded on paper - since even Plato (who unlike Socrates wasn't opposed to writing down ideas) felt that certain concepts could only be expressed properly in person.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato#Unwritten_doctrines
07-24-2013 05:47 PM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #79
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
Okay - this is the most fucked up thought experiment ever. I first came across it when I was about 14 - and rarely a day goes by where I don't find myself thinking about it.

Welcome to the strange world of quantum suicide and subjective quantum immortality.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovat...uicide.htm
(This post was last modified: 07-24-2013 08:51 PM by cardguy.)
07-24-2013 08:50 PM
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Wutang Offline
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Post: #80
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(07-24-2013 05:47 PM)cardguy Wrote:  I am not sure how Aristotle's work got lost - since I have yet to study the history of Greek thought and how it was rediscovered in the Renaissance. But - to give one example - if the Library of Alexandria hadn't being burned down - then they they would have survived (along with many other scholary treasures).

If I recall correctly, Aristotle's writings spread to the the Muslim world and was preserved there while disappearing from Europe during the Dark and Middle ages. This knowledge led to the intellectual golden age of the Muslim world. Aristotle's works was recovered during and after the Crusades due to more contact between the Western and Muslim world. I guess it's hard to fathom now, but Muslim world was indeed more intellectually advanced and productive during this time.
07-25-2013 12:57 AM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #81
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
There is a section discussing this on wikipedia - although it is hard for me to follow since I have yet to study all of Aristotle's work. So much to do - and so little time...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aristotle#L..._his_works
07-25-2013 10:15 AM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #82
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
And for those interested in some gossip about Saul Kripke (probably the most important analytical philosopher of the twentieth century). Here are some allegations of plagiarism in his work:

http://linguafranca.mirror.theinfo.org/A...whose.html

And it was a woman that the ideas were stolen from. Quite remarkable since I don't tend to associate philosophical brilliance with women.
(This post was last modified: 07-25-2013 10:22 AM by cardguy.)
07-25-2013 10:16 AM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #83
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
Best anagram ever...

Quote:To be or not to be: that is the question; whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune...

is an anagram of:

Quote:In one of the Bard's best-thought-of tragedies our insistent hero, Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten.
07-26-2013 01:51 AM
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Wutang Offline
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Post: #84
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
I would like to submit a book recommendation. Actually, the book is actually a comic book - or "graphic novel" if you want a term to you feel better about reading a book with lots of colorful pictures:

http://www.amazon.com/Logicomix-An-Epic-...1596914521

In the early 20th century all the advances that the physical sciences were making led to the optimistic hope that we would eventually have 100% certain knowledge of all there is to know. If we were going to have this certain knowledge, it would to rest on strong foundations and what stronger foundation is there other than mathematics? "Logicomix" traces the quest undertaken by intellectual giants such as Bertrand Russel (who is the main character in the book), David Hilbert, Kurt Godel, and others to ensure that these mathematical foundations should be made absolutely impenetrable against doubts and logical objections.

If that sounds dry, I promise that the story is not. The comic is just as much about the inner drama of the characters involved and how ironically, the pursuit of pure logic and reason brought forth the strongest, most passionate emotions out of these people - including madness which becomes a recurring theme in the story. How the "ghost of madness" haunts these seemingly rational and reasonable men is a plot point that gets used over and over again.

On a personal note, this comic actually had a big real life effect on me in that it was one of the big reasons I finally bit the bullet and decided to go back to school to pursue a master's degree in computer science. I spent most of my life absolutely hating doing mathematics in school and I remember feeling relieved when I finally finished calculus in undergraduate - thinking it was the last time I would ever have to deal with math. After reading this book and then finally applying and being accepted to a graduate school, I couldn't wait to take the discrete maths class that was required (normally this class is taken in a undergraduate comp sci curriculum but since I was not a comp sci major I had to take it first before I could pursue further graduate study) and I actually ended up buying the text book about a month before the semester started just so I could cracking on the material right away. To my delight, the textbook we were using (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0072899050) featured mini-biographies about many important figures in the development of comp sci and the mathematics behind it and many of the people were characters that I had already read about in Logicomix.
07-26-2013 03:21 AM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #85
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(07-26-2013 01:51 AM)cardguy Wrote:  Best anagram ever...

Quote:To be or not to be: that is the question; whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune...

is an anagram of:

Quote:In one of the Bard's best-thought-of tragedies our insistent hero, Hamlet, queries on two fronts about how life turns rotten.

I'm dumb. Put this in the wrong thread!
07-26-2013 04:05 AM
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Player_1337 Offline
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Post: #86
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
Are there any Mill or Kant fans present?

ABC
07-26-2013 11:54 AM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #87
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
I like Immanuel Kant. His idea of Transcendental Idealism was a big one for me when I first came across it.

This was when I first started to (self-)study philsoophy. Some books at the time were saying it was the most powerful concept in the history of philosophy.

Although strangely it was never covered at the university I did philosophy at (I asked some graduates after I dopped out).

So - I am guessing some people in philosophy don't rate Kant as highly as others.

One thing I heard is that the analytic style of philosophy was inspired by Kant. But applied his ideas not to consciousness - and the way that shapes our world and our understanding of it. But to language and the way it shapes our world and understanding of it.

A kind of language based version of Transcendental Idealism. If that makes sense.

It kind of works. If you take Kant, mix in some Frege and some (later) Wittgenstein - you have the roots of alot of modern philosophy.

At least that is how it seems to me - but I am very much an amateur.
07-26-2013 12:09 PM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #88
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
Growing up I was very affected by a quote from Richard Feynman - 'If you can't explain your idea to an intellgent twelve year old boy, you don't understand what you are saying.'

With that in mind - I have always being most moved by powerful ideas that are easy to grasp. Since when there is no waffling involved it is easy to see how insightful and original an idea is.

So - whilst the following is a very simple point. It is actually one of the most interesting ideas I have ever come across. It is from the Stanislaw Ulam, who was a brilliant mathematician.

Quote:"When I was a boy I felt that the role of rhyme in poetry was to compel one to find the unobvious because of the necessity of finding a word which rhymes. This forces novel associations and almost guarantees deviations from routine chains or trains of thought. It becomes paradoxically a sort of automatic mechanism of originality.... And what we call talent or perhaps genius itself depends to a large extent on the ability to use one's memory properly to find the analogies... essential to the development of new ideas."

It is amazing how interesting and bizarre your ideas can become when you force yourself to think in rhyming couplets.

It is as if the brain needs a happy medium between too much freedom and too little freedom when it is trying to think up new ideas. Since it helps focus in on non-obvious concepts.

An excellent example of this is the fucked up narrative to R. Kelly's hillarious 'Trapped In The Closet' series. The story is too bizarre to think up from scratch. But with the limitations of making it scan and rhyme properly - it almost acts as an algorithm for creativity.





By coincidence - I have just being listening to an old (and bizarre) yorkshire folk song which also has a fucked up story. Again - the rhyme is largely responsible for this. It is called On Ilkla Moor Baht'at and is famous here in the UK.
(This post was last modified: 07-26-2013 03:21 PM by cardguy.)
07-26-2013 02:53 PM
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TheKantian Offline
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Post: #89
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(07-26-2013 03:21 AM)Wutang Wrote:  I would like to submit a book recommendation. Actually, the book is actually a comic book - or "graphic novel" if you want a term to you feel better about reading a book with lots of colorful pictures:

http://www.amazon.com/Logicomix-An-Epic-...1596914521

In the early 20th century all the advances that the physical sciences were making led to the optimistic hope that we would eventually have 100% certain knowledge of all there is to know. If we were going to have this certain knowledge, it would to rest on strong foundations and what stronger foundation is there other than mathematics? "Logicomix" traces the quest undertaken by intellectual giants such as Bertrand Russel (who is the main character in the book), David Hilbert, Kurt Godel, and others to ensure that these mathematical foundations should be made absolutely impenetrable against doubts and logical objections.

If that sounds dry, I promise that the story is not. The comic is just as much about the inner drama of the characters involved and how ironically, the pursuit of pure logic and reason brought forth the strongest, most passionate emotions out of these people - including madness which becomes a recurring theme in the story. How the "ghost of madness" haunts these seemingly rational and reasonable men is a plot point that gets used over and over again.

On a personal note, this comic actually had a big real life effect on me in that it was one of the big reasons I finally bit the bullet and decided to go back to school to pursue a master's degree in computer science. I spent most of my life absolutely hating doing mathematics in school and I remember feeling relieved when I finally finished calculus in undergraduate - thinking it was the last time I would ever have to deal with math. After reading this book and then finally applying and being accepted to a graduate school, I couldn't wait to take the discrete maths class that was required (normally this class is taken in a undergraduate comp sci curriculum but since I was not a comp sci major I had to take it first before I could pursue further graduate study) and I actually ended up buying the text book about a month before the semester started just so I could cracking on the material right away. To my delight, the textbook we were using (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0072899050) featured mini-biographies about many important figures in the development of comp sci and the mathematics behind it and many of the people were characters that I had already read about in Logicomix.
I enjoyed Logicomix, but it's important to note that it's not 100% historical fact.

You should also check out number theory, Rosen has a book about it too, if you haven't already.
07-26-2013 06:38 PM
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Wutang Offline
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Post: #90
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
Yep even the creators acknowledged at the end of the book that they had taken creative liberties, such as having characters meet that never met in real life. Russell never met Frege or Cantor in the flesh.
07-26-2013 09:32 PM
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cardguy Offline
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Post: #91
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(06-24-2013 01:01 AM)The Texas Prophet Wrote:  Not trying to start a flame war, but does philosophy still have relevance in today's world?

Outside of arguments about ethics, morality and law, I just don't see what philosophy provides that can't be answered by the physical, biological and social sciences & mathematics. Look at all the advances that physical, biological and social science & mathematics have provided and compare that to what modern philosophy provides. I think the answer is clear.

I don't know, I guess I am just ranting because in college philosophy was my least favorite course. We read a lot of primary source material and had a lot of discussions, but I could never get very motivated about it.

Just want to pick out this queston from earlier in the thread.

I am just getting to the end of the McGinn book and will use that book to answer this question.

More to come...
07-30-2013 12:24 PM
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Samseau Offline
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Post: #92
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(07-26-2013 12:09 PM)cardguy Wrote:  I like Immanuel Kant. His idea of Transcendental Idealism was a big one for me when I first came across it.

This was when I first started to (self-)study philsoophy. Some books at the time were saying it was the most powerful concept in the history of philosophy.

Although strangely it was never covered at the university I did philosophy at (I asked some graduates after I dopped out).

So - I am guessing some people in philosophy don't rate Kant as highly as others.

One thing I heard is that the analytic style of philosophy was inspired by Kant. But applied his ideas not to consciousness - and the way that shapes our world and our understanding of it. But to language and the way it shapes our world and understanding of it.

A kind of language based version of Transcendental Idealism. If that makes sense.

It kind of works. If you take Kant, mix in some Frege and some (later) Wittgenstein - you have the roots of alot of modern philosophy.

At least that is how it seems to me - but I am very much an amateur.

There isn't a philosopher alive today who hasn't taken from Kant. Kant is the modern day Aristotle.

Kant practically invented modern psychology. His ideas of the mind working independently of our will to create our experiences is basically the first time someone thought of a sub-conscious.

Contributor at Return of Kings. You can follow me on Gab.

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(This post was last modified: 07-30-2013 01:25 PM by Samseau.)
07-30-2013 01:24 PM
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Sherman Offline
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Post: #93
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
If anyone is interested the course "Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy" has started this week on coursera.

https://www.coursera.org/course/mathphil

Rico... Sauve....
07-30-2013 02:25 PM
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Post: #94
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
Okay - long post to follow.

Just wanted to say - that the interesting part of the following post is towards the end. So - it may be worth sticking with - even if it seems mundane at first.

My post ultimately sets out the importance of philosophy, and why it has value (separate from any scientific pretensions).
07-30-2013 02:43 PM
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RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
TRUTH BY ANALYSIS: GAMES, NAMES AND PHILOSOPHY by Colin McGinn came out last year. And it is a brilliant book discussing the topic of meta-philosophy (what kind of subject philosophy is).

Colin McGinn is a superb writer - and I am in awe at how smart he is. Anyway - this book now resides as being the best book on philosophy I have read. And it is quite an easy read (apart from 2-3 chapters). So - I encourage others to check it out.

The book was inspired by a book that Colin McGinn recently came across. The book is THE GRASSHOPPER: GAMES. LIFE AND UTOPIA by Bernard Suits. Bernard died back in 2007. And his book (the only book he ever wrote) was published back in 1978.

This book is little known in philosophy. But its reputation is rising as it becomes something of a cult classic.

And the book, McGinn has written, is partly written in tribute to the work of Bernard Suits. And uses that work to analyse the subject of philosophy itself.

The book starts with an appraisal of Bernard Suits' work in providing a conceptual analysis of the concept 'Games'. The analysis Bernard Suits offers is as follows:

Quote:"To play a game is to attempt to achieve a specific state of affairs [prelusory goal], using only means permitted by rules [lusory means], where the rules prohibit use of more efficient in favour of less efficient means [constitutive rules], and where the rules are accepted just because they make possible such activity [lusory attitude]."

A shorter definiton is given as "the voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles".

Now why is this important? It is important because Ludwig Wittgenstein (the most famous philosopher of the twentieth century) argued in his book 'Philosophical Investigations' that such conceptual analysis was impossible.

And the goal of philosophy is to resist trying to discover such formulations when analysing concepts (a way of thinking that Wittgenstein disliked and considered an invasion from the world of science). And instead should search for 'family resemblences' when trying to classify different examples of the same concept.

As such - Wittgenstein's view of philosophy was as a therapeutic activity in which language was analysed and parsed back to prevent ourselves tangling ourselves in conceptual confusions. Indeed - Wittgenstein took the viewpoint that genuine philosophical problems did not exist. And instead the goal of the philosopher was to clear up the muddy thinking which leads people astray into pseduo-philosophical confusion.

And one of the prime examples of this was in Wittgenstein's analysis of the concept of 'Games'. Over many pages - Wittgenstein anaylses the concept. Before declaring that there is no way of formulating a analysis which covers all types of 'Games'.

Instead - the best we can do is show 'family resemblences' between different types of games. And as such - philosophy has to reconceptualise itself as a less ambitious project which is there to help others from falling prey of such attampts to carry out traditional philosophy.

And with that one sentence consisting of 55 words - Bernard Suits shows that Wittgenstein is dead wrong. A conceptual analysis of 'Games' is possible.

The book by Bernard Suits is a witty, playful and brilliant defense of all the objections that may be thrown at his analysis. And Colin McGinn encourages everyone to check out Bernard Suits book.

So - with that as a background. Colin McGinn runs with the idea of 'conceptual analysis' and over 2-3 philosophically dense chapters he argues that all philosophy can be properly defined as conceptual analysis.

This is important and interesting work.

Later in the book - McGinn returns to the Bernard Suits book.

Let's look again at the title of the Suits book - The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia.

What the hell does Utopia have to do with anything?

Well this is where it gets fun.

You see - later in the Suits book - Bernard Suits goes on to imagine what life would be like in Utopia? Imagine a world where you could press a button - and all your earthly desires would be met. Instantly. Anything you want - you got it.

Want sex with Marilyn Monroe? Bang!

Want to bring your dead grandma back to life? Cool - what next?

Want to travel back in time and witness the assasination of Julius Caesar? You got it!

Hell - you want to be Julius Caesar? Not a problem!

Now - what would that be like?

After a few million years of having all your worldly desires met. Things might get a bit boring. So how would we then occupy our time?

By playing games.

And nothing else.

You see - everything in this paradise can be had at the push of a button.

Indeed - even most intellectual pursuits would become boring.

You want the secret to Life, The Universe and Everything? Yawn - have you not learned by now? Press the button.

And whatever formula which links gravity with quantum mechanics and explains the existence of dark energy, dark matter, the Higgs boson, superstring theory and why there is something instead of nothing will be implanted into your brain with full understanding - instantaneously...

You want the greatest book it is possible to write? Press the button.

You want the most moving piece of music possible? Press the button.

But you want to beat me at ten-pin bowling? Whoops. Sorry. You can't press the button!

You see - the means and the goals of playing a game are intertwined in a fundamental way. The only way you can get the genuine satisfaction of beating me in a game of ten-pin bowling. Is to actually put aside an hour - risk defeat - and beat me at ten pin bowling.

Everything else would be a cheat (like hypnotising me into losing) - and would not replicate the genuine sense of achievement which comes from genuinely playing a game.

So - according to Bernard Suits - games are much more profound than we realise. Since they ultimately represent the very pinnacle of life. Since the playing of games is such that even living in Utopia wouldn't provide a substitution for it.

And Colin McGinn follows this up by wondering if this is why playing games is so much fun and enjoyable? Since they give us a glimpse of a care free world, where all our bodily needs and desires are met, and where the only thing which matters is the goal at hand?

At this point. Colin McGinn challenges Bernard Suits. Since Bernard Suits says in Utopis - all scientific and philosophical knowledge can be had at the push of a button. McGinn agrees when it comes to Science. But things are a bit different for Philosophy.

To see why - let's press the button and find out which philosophical theories are true and which are false.

Okay - let's say we pressed it. And it spits out the answer that Plato's Theory Of Forms (the most famous idea in the history of philosophy) is completely true.

Great! And now what?

See - at this point. It is a bit like sitting a 16 year old boy down (who knows nothing about art and has never seen a painting) and showing him the Greatest Painting Of All Time.

Let's imagine it was decided (by a group of experts) that The Mona Lisa was the greatest painting of all time. Well - without the context of knowing the history of the painting, how it differs from the styles that preceded and followed it, it's mysterious subject (and theories that surround that). And without being able to look at the painting in the context of the other brilliant work (both artistic and scientific) done by Leonardo Da Vinci - much of the impact and pleasure of the painting would be lost.

Without that understanding to provide context - it cannot be fully appreciated.

Unlike Science - the true pleasure in philosophy is understanding the subject as a whole. And being able to judge the merits of one position over another.

So whilst - Science and Philosophy are both interested in Truth. Science tackles this with a 'work' like approach where the only thing that matters is the result.

Whereas Philosophy - tackles this goal in the spirt of play. Such that the intellectual play involved in arriving at your conclusions is an essential part of the goal of philosophy.

It is hard to get your head around. But philosophy is stuck in it's own world - almost like a mixture of chess and science.

This makes sense if we think about it. If Plato's Theory Of Forms is correct. And I tell my brother (who has never studied philosophy) this. It will be a meaningless statement to him - since the only way you can truly appreciate (and enjoy) this fact. Is by first spending years - studying Plato's position. It's importance and how it differs from those which came before and after.

It is the context which surrounds our knowledge - which is just as important as our knowledge. In the way that it isn't with Science - where just plugging in the formula F=ma is all that is important.

So - with Colin Mcginn's analysis. My metaphilosophy is one I am finally comfortable with.

And in a round about way - I hope this provides an analysis of what value philosophy has that is different to science. Since if Utopia exists - people will still have philosophical discussions. Long after all scientific questions have being answered at the touch of a button.

I should add as well - that this brilliant book by Colin McGinn also has a superb analysis of metaphysics which was a revelation to me.
(This post was last modified: 07-30-2013 03:08 PM by cardguy.)
07-30-2013 02:43 PM
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TheKantian Offline
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Post: #96
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
(07-30-2013 02:25 PM)Sherman Wrote:  If anyone is interested the course "Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy" has started this week on coursera.

https://www.coursera.org/course/mathphil
I'm actually in that right now.
07-30-2013 04:21 PM
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Post: #97
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
This made me laugh. Not sure why...

Quote:A student asked the philosopher J. L. Austin what ‘existing’ was. Austin replied that it was like breathing only quieter.
07-30-2013 11:27 PM
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Post: #98
RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
@The Kantian...
on half full and half empty. i dont disagree. I think these are because of language misuse. I was merely using that as starting point with regards to the common usage of the term. that is why i called them "puzzles". because they are not puzzles.


(07-22-2013 02:06 PM)TheKantian Wrote:  
(07-21-2013 12:57 AM)Nemencine Wrote:  Take the half-full vs half-empty.

Condition A: Half full means that the cup was full(at 100% of water)..then we drain the cup to 50% water. correct?

Condition B: Half empty means that the Cup was at empty(at 100% of emptiness) then we fill the cup to 50%(with water.)
No. I wouldn't say draining or filling has anything to do with half full or half empty.

I really don't think these are puzzles or problems at all. I mean it's no more of a "puzzle" than half clothed or half naked is.

A feminist crying rape will disagree with half-clothed/half-naked part....or half penetrated/half-out. just saying.....

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It is time for me to leave this forum. It has been fun knowing you all. Enjoy.
07-31-2013 10:30 PM
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Nemencine Away
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Post: #99
COUNTERFACTUALS...
anyways, 2wycked thread about "what if's" made me think of counterfactuals.

Anybody have any good reference sources for counterfactuals?....possible world semantics...modal logic. .etc.

I havent read about them in ages....i need to brush up.

This is why i love philosophy: there is an eerie brutality in the way philosophers employ logic against fluffy stuff. It is utterly merciless and primal in its violence. It is just purifying and sublime. Pristine, cold, and arid in a breathtaking kind-of-way. It is like listening to Chopin's nocturnes while watching a massive, savage ocean roils her waves with utter grandeur of indifference.





the way a philosopher would go about dissecting the issues in 2wycked thread on "what ifs" will be different from the way a psychologist would dissect the same issue.

This is why i love philosophy...this is why i love the hard sciences. They have little tolerance for "fluff". Hard and harsh, they beckon me.

anyways, that is my response to the Texas Prophet on "why philosophy?"

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It is time for me to leave this forum. It has been fun knowing you all. Enjoy.
07-31-2013 10:39 PM
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cardguy Offline
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RE: Since the other Philosophy thread is dead
In terms of 'what Ifs' - the most important work is by Saul Kripke (Naming and Necessity) and the Modal Realism of David K Lewis.

I have read some books by Saul Kripke. But haven't done a proper study of his work yet. The same goes for David K. Lewis.

My new favourite philsopher is Colin McGinn. So - I am currently looking into his other works.

Daniel Dennett was my favourite philosopher - because he could write in such an interesting and clear way about subjects which I wasn't neccesarily that interested in (AI, evolution and philosophy of mind).

What is great about Colin McGinn is that he too is a very clear writer. And addresses sucbjects like metaphysics and metaphilosophy. Two subjects I am fascinated by. And he writes well about traditional philosophy of mind as well.
(This post was last modified: 07-31-2013 10:59 PM by cardguy.)
07-31-2013 10:57 PM
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