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"A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
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2Wycked Offline
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"A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
NOTE: This post will touch on many topics I have already covered: beta male codependency, psychological splitting, female use of media for narcissistic impulses & the collapse of America. Random fact I just noticed - I have the number of likes given & received at 839 now. Weird.

Review Of The Episode

You can watch the episode online here.

[Image: 71.png]

"A Stop At Willoughby" is a sad, wistful piece about a man who is not long for the intense pressures of the modern world.

The show opens with a man named Gart Williams, a New Yorker working in advertising, getting yelled at by his fat boss for losing an important account. The boss tells him the business is "push, push, push" and he had better get with the program. He goes home, depressed, and is confronted with his cold, cruel gold-digging wife. She gives him no sympathy and refers to him as a later-day Huckleberry Finn.

He goes back to work and the situation worsens with his boss. He has a breakdown at work and when he phones his wife, she leaves him cold with no compassion. She refuses to show any love or compassion to him after his begging.

All through out this he travel by train to and from work. He drifts off to sleep in the November snow showers and travels to a small, slow town in the 1880's called Willoughby. It is quaint, slow-paced and free from all the pressures of the modern world. As the situation in his life worsens, he dreams even more of this world.

Eventually, he decides the next time he fantasies about Willoughby, "he will get off the train." Indeed, in the last scene he does get off the train - to his death on the train tracks while shouting, "Willoughby!" The ending is ambiguous as to whether he intentionally committed suicide or did it his dream-like state. My theory is that the train symbolized life and his suicide show the unnatural nature of suicide. Anyway, as his body is hauled into the hearse, the door is closed and we see the name of the mortuary is "Willoughby & Sons."

Here is the ending narration by Serling:

Quote:Willoughby? Maybe it's wishful thinking nestled in a hidden part of a man's mind, or maybe it's the last stop in the vast design of things - or perhaps, for a man like Mr. Gart Williams, who climbed on a world that went by too fast, it's a place around the bend where he could jump off. Willoughby? Whatever it is, it comes with sunlight and serenity, and is a part of The Twilight Zone.

The Liberal Narcissism Of Todd VanDerWerff

Before I break this down, let's talk about a feminist-friendly review of the episode that frames perfectly why this man committed suicide and why feminists play a direct hand into it.

[Image: toddvanderwerffresize_535049.jpg]

The author is Todd VanDerWerff. Clearly, a soft man divorced of masculinity, as he approving cites feminism & shows his anti-male bias in his review.

I really only want to talk about Todd's approach to the main character of Gart and Gart's wife. Todd seems to have trouble seeing Gart's wife as a villain. He expressly states he has trouble with this and also doesn't see her as oppressing him. He likes her "Huckleberry Finn" comment as it has a "stab of truth" to it. He sees her as somebody that is trying to get Gart to grow up and come into the modern world.

If that wasn't sick enough, Todd dances around Gart's suicide and why he does it. He talks about ambiguity and how we don't know what was going through Gart's mind when he jumped off the train. That much is true. The most compelling issue, to me as a human with compassion, is just why did he do it?

This is one of my sticking points with liberalism. They talk a big game of deconstruction, dismantling untoward power structures but they have little to say about how to reform the world. All the talk about striving for equality, decency & human rights is nothing but worthless pablum to paper over the supreme lack of positive solutions for the world.

Take the Sexual Revolution, liberals kicked off the reigns with no thought as the underlying psychology of America, the potential ramifications for sexuality & human relationships, much less the economic ramifications or the ramifications for children. We did it in the name of removing oppression & helping the kids. No, you did for yourselves and then used claims for compassion & equality to cover up your reckless & blatant selfishness.

We see this here in Todd's piece. An episode like "A Stop At Willoughby" can be disconcerting to a liberal because of temporal issues. One idea I have yet to wrap my mind around is liberal obsession with temporal politics - i.e. the unending accusations of "being in the wrong time period," "the time has passed for that idea," or "that is not how the modern world works." It sidesteps any real rebuttals while also playing up an appeal to authority - society doesn't think that now, so it is inappropriate.

Todd brings up racism in the 1950's about how dreaming of the past is inappropriate because of bad situations like that. That is a classic liberal sidestep, as this episode had absolutely ZERO to do with race, so he is needlessly injecting race into it. Further, he intones that only a white male will fantasize about the past, as we are far more happy in our growing "equality" in the modern world. A common argument that feminists level against men complaining about the modern world & workplace is that men simply need to adapt to the changing world instead of complaining about it - women have adapted!

The problem with this analysis is that is completely ignores real male feelings about the world around them. Men are routinely exhorted to express their feelings so they can become humans, instead of the stoic, masculine zombies they pretend to be. However, when they do like Gart in this episode, they are told they need to grow up and become a real man. Todd approves of this analysis, as he probably sees Gart as some racist misogynist who pines away for a time when he was so privileged he didn't have to think about the world around him.

I bang on about narcissism, but this a clear case of liberal narcissism. We are presented with a man who clearly is depressed with his life. His wife is a horrible person, but do liberals & feminists care? What matters is the maintaining the zeitgeist of subjected white males to horrendous levels of criticism. Gart was a man distraught over the increasingly hectic & narcissistic workplace. His wife was a controlling bitch. What was his recourse? Real compassion for fellow humans cannot be constrained by the artifices of victim politics - either you empathize with somebody or you do not. The fact that people like Todd can feel so much sympathy for women in the past, but completely ignore male suffering strongly suggests somebody who doesn't feel compassion at all, but understand the needs to show it off in order to get social approval.

A Stop At Disenchantment: The Social Retreating Of Men

[Image: 230d1308879792-men-good-whoneedshusband.jpg]

One the reasons that men like Gart commit suicide is because of ignorant people like Todd VanDerWerff. Why is it so hard to sympathize with a man in psychological trouble?

Part of the reason is the complete ignoring of psychology by liberals. I don't give two squirts of piss whether white, heterosexual males have it so good in society. I don't limit my feelings for others within some narcissistic, proscribed bounds. Healthy people do not do that. Either you feel for somebody or you don't. You do it on the basis of their individual reality and how you relate to that.

Gart's seeing Willoughby as liberating & serene has to rub some liberals wrong. It suggests the world that has been constructed by liberals is deficient & hurts people. Todd criticized the past as being oppressive, but that criticism does nothing to alleviate Gart's concerns. While the issue of whether Willoughby was just a mental mirage constructed by Gart or representative of America is an interesting one, it completely avoids the main issue:

Why are men like Gart so disaffected?

At the end of day, that is the troubling question that lingers in your mind after watching the episode. He clearly is a man with codependent qualities, as he spends much of his time fantasizing about a reality that does not belong to him. However, it is clear he is surrounded by unhealthy people: his narcissistic wife, his bellicose, domineering boss. He doesn't seem to have a social support network.

Escaping into the fields of fantasy is the option he chooses. It isn't a healthy one, but one that allows him to cope with a life that is completely depressing. The golden future of true love & career fulfillment that are supposed to be awaiting a man have never come to fruition. The reality is that most people never get there. It is intriguing that Gart works in advertising, as his industry has done much to fool men like Gart that the modern American way resulted in happiness & fulfillment.

While that is part of his disaffection, another key element is his wife. When Todd talked about not wanting to treat Gart's wife as a villain, he providing a key insight into why men are retreating from society at large. Sensing their needs & desires are not treated as important and relevant, they get retreat into their own mind, sometimes via fantasies, sometimes via video games, etc.

It is the complete & utter inability of society at large to understand the ways women hurt men in relationships. Part of the reticence is the lingering idea that women are more moral & compassionate than men, so they are not likely to hurt men in relationships - the reverse needs to be true.

Further, is the female domination of media. Women are not going to tune into a TV show, magazine or blog if said outlet is about exposing female abuse of men. Sure, if it is framed in a narcissistic way - i.e. I'm better than that bitch/whore/etc. It cannot purely be about showing compassion towards a man by way of how a woman treats him. There has to be something plus - i.e. he is a closeted gay man who is verbally abused by his wife when she finds out, etc. Also, consider how women use media to taunt men and let men know women don't need them anymore. How compassionate.

Men like Gart realize that society is not long for them unless they are confident, successful & attractive to women. If they are not, they had better be quiet about it otherwise they will be shamed back in silence so as to perpetuate female delusions about themselves & society. Omega losers like Todd VanDerWerff have a stake in this oppression, as they think they will finally get that elusive female sexual approval once "patriarchal" gender norms are dismantled. What fools like Todd don't understand - and men like Gart do - is that all you have as a beta male or less is to completely submit to female frame or get cruelly tossed aside. Either you kowtow to female narcissism & play the non-human in their life or get busy fucking off. Gart could not come to terms with it, so he splits & commits suicide.

There has been much talk about the terrible state of the modern workplace, but what really hurt Gart was his wife. Gart was understandably upset with his work environment, but it was his wife's coldness that did him in.

This is why alpha male parenting is so important. Men like Hart need to understand that to depend on a woman emotionally & psychologically is always a bad move. Women flee men who are in pain & need help. Women only care about themselves & self-image. If they feel like you are not the man they want to be seen with, they will dump you quicker than Michael Jackson's pants with a child.

This point will always be considered sexist & misogynistic precisely because it punctures female's collective delusions about how they treat men. The increasing number of men like Gart in America doesn't nothing to help women feel good about themselves, so they paint those men as hateful, troubled or ignore them outright. Just like that man who self-immolated on the steps of family court, he had to be relegated to the footnotes of American history lest women get their fantasies upset.

The sad ending to Gart's life represented his only true act of personal autonomy - killing himself. Who cares of white privilege, etc. if you do not have autonomy over your life? Gart's life bothers feminists because it strongly suggests most men do not have power over their life and women are often the cause of it.

People do not die from suicide, they die from sadness.

Old Chinese Man Wrote:  why you wonder how many man another man bang? why you care who bang who mr high school drama man
(This post was last modified: 07-04-2013 04:26 AM by 2Wycked.)
07-04-2013 03:51 AM
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WesternCancer Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
Dayyyyyyum

Great post man, really made me think.
07-04-2013 05:07 AM
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Days of Broken Arrows Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
Great write-up! And here is further proof the AV Club writer's feminist take on the episode is wrong.

"A Stop at Willoughby" is "Twilight Zone" creator Rod Serling's alternate take on an earlier idea of his, a TV movie called "Patterns." "Patterns" is a no-holds-barred look at how the pressures of the business world crush certain men. "Willoughby" riffs on that, but throws in a demanding wife.

There had to be a reason Serling decided to add a nasty wife character to a similar story. The AV Club review not only willingly ignores this, it misinterprets what Serling was trying to say: that men are only valued for their work. There was no "Peter Pan Syndrome" back then; the wife wasn't telling him to "grow up" because that generation of men had already fought in wars and had, in fact, grown up. Todd VanDerWerff displays a clear ignorance of history by not realizing this.

You can't really review "Willoughby" properly without seeing "Patterns" first and the AV Club review doesn't mention it. "Patterns" was Serling's first big hit and it's essential viewing for anyone who is a fan of his.

Here's a link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEUHl8RGrpk
07-04-2013 06:25 AM
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
(07-04-2013 03:51 AM)2Wycked Wrote:  The author is Todd VanDerWerff. Clearly, a soft man divorced of masculinity, as he approving cites feminism & shows his anti-male bias in his review.

VanDerWerff frequently complains about the amount of female nudity in Game Of Thrones and says it's due to sexism. I think he's just jealous because their vaginas are smaller and prettier than his.
07-04-2013 06:40 AM
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Architekt Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
What the fuck is wrong with that dude's ears? And the rest of his twisted, sideways fat face?

Anyway, another point I might like to add, is the deconstruction of the "light at the end of the tunnel" sentiment. When he finally makes it to his dream land of Willoughby, he is killed. In the past, hope has been used as a tool for those who have dreams to get out in to the world and seek out success. Here, that idea of finally trying to do something about your problems is met with, not just negative consequences, but death. This seems to suggest "don't bother trying, you'll never get anywhere, and if you do, you'll just die."

Now, this is interesting, because on the other side of the spectrum, we have..

[Image: you-go-girl-luigi-racco.jpg]

At this point, I'd like to dig out a quote from some random feminist who posted on my blog. (What is most impressive about this, is that she pulled this out of nowhere, and it was completely unrelated to anything from previous discussion, then immediately ran away from the argument. Probably to reassure herself with some ice cream and crying. Way to show how strong and independent you are!)

Quote:I will never be told to sit down, shut up, and take it.

You go girl! You sit there and do whatever the fuck you want, while all the men have to do exactly what you tell them!

This all ties in with your points about feminist delusion and narcissism. Hipocrisy slips nicely in there, too.

I think I'm going to dub this term the "pedestal complex."

Pedestal complex:
Being told that you're right so often that, not only do you start to believe every thought that comes to your mind, you're willing to impose these thoughts upon others, without even considering the possibility that your word is not that of divine truth.

Maybe I'll do a blog post about it..
07-04-2013 07:48 AM
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Ocelot Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
(07-04-2013 03:51 AM)2Wycked Wrote:  [Image: toddvanderwerffresize_535049.jpg]

The author is Todd VanDerWerff. Clearly, a soft man divorced of masculinity, as he approving cites feminism & shows his anti-male bias in his review.

Why is it that male feminists always seem to look like they're on oestrogen supplements and have an under-active thyroid? Perhaps a better question: which is responsible for the other? Does a physical lack of masculinity lead men to become feminists, or does reading Germaine Greer actually slowly transform them into:
[Image: Churchill-insurance-dog-007.jpg]

You're absolutely spot on about the necessity of alpha male parenting. It doesn't even have to be a parent figure - a strong masculine role model of any kind is crucially important in a boy's development. My best friend's father was killed in a car accident when he was a toddler. His mother struggled raising him, and he ended up getting involved with gangs at a very young age. I'm 100% convinced that the masculine leadership and brotherhood he experienced in the gang he rolled with is the sole reason he's less fucked up than anyone else I know raised by a single mother. Hell, he has a hot girlfriend and a job, and is one of the alphas of his university.

Compare with this other guy I know, who also lost his father to a car accident when he was a toddler. He was raised by a career woman, and 90% of his facebook posts are about radical feminism and how he 'hates masculinity'.

Notice any resemblance to Todd VanDerWerff?

Also:
(07-04-2013 03:51 AM)2Wycked Wrote:  Real compassion for fellow humans cannot be constrained by the artifices of victim politics - either you empathize with somebody or you do not.
Beautiful. I hope you don't mind if I borrow this!

Ocelot's reading list for those interested in musical composition
Ocelot's older, less focused list of books on music in general
To anyone who's leaving, my inbox is open.
(This post was last modified: 02-06-2016 05:43 PM by Ocelot.)
07-04-2013 08:56 AM
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vinman Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
Like the Rizza told Raekwon, your nickname should be "The Chef" because you're alway cooking up some marvelous shit!

"Feminism is a trade union for ugly women"- Peregrine
07-04-2013 09:33 AM
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2Wycked Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
@Everybody: Thanks for the positive feedback.

@DoBA: I have actually never heard of that, but I will have to check that video out before I rewrite this RoK & include that in my analysis. Thanks!

Old Chinese Man Wrote:  why you wonder how many man another man bang? why you care who bang who mr high school drama man
07-04-2013 04:59 PM
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Sp5 Offline
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RE: "A Stop At Willoughby:" The Growing Disillusionment Of Men In Society
I saw Patterns yesterday on TCM Asia, it was great. One interesting thing is how the wife of the up-and-coming executive Staples is more ambitious than Staples himself. She stabs Staples's friend and co-worker in the back to advance her husband's career.


(07-04-2013 06:25 AM)Days of Broken Arrows Wrote:  Great write-up! And here is further proof the AV Club writer's feminist take on the episode is wrong.

"A Stop at Willoughby" is "Twilight Zone" creator Rod Serling's alternate take on an earlier idea of his, a TV movie called "Patterns." "Patterns" is a no-holds-barred look at how the pressures of the business world crush certain men. "Willoughby" riffs on that, but throws in a demanding wife.

There had to be a reason Serling decided to add a nasty wife character to a similar story. The AV Club review not only willingly ignores this, it misinterprets what Serling was trying to say: that men are only valued for their work. There was no "Peter Pan Syndrome" back then; the wife wasn't telling him to "grow up" because that generation of men had already fought in wars and had, in fact, grown up. Todd VanDerWerff displays a clear ignorance of history by not realizing this.

You can't really review "Willoughby" properly without seeing "Patterns" first and the AV Club review doesn't mention it. "Patterns" was Serling's first big hit and it's essential viewing for anyone who is a fan of his.

Here's a link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEUHl8RGrpk
07-04-2013 11:11 PM
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