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Books on vehicular maintenance
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theoogabear Offline
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Post: #1
Books on vehicular maintenance
I'm pretty embarrassed, I don't know a damn thing abiut vehicular maintenance. At all. Nothing. And as I'm getting older I'm really starting to know the need for this kind of knowledge, especially in America. Is there any books I can read to get started on the theory of car engines and the like?
09-06-2013 11:17 AM
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el mechanico Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
Watch youtube videos

Buy this scanner
http://www.toolfetch.com/launch-tech-301...7AodoTEAFQ

Start hooking it up on anyones car with warning lights then google the codes and read about them. Watch youtube videos on how to change whatever part you want. Get better at it then $$$
09-06-2013 02:41 PM
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HonantheBarbarian Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
E-mech got it right on the money.

The scanner is a very valuable tool in your belt, I had to learn on OBD1 so I don't have the ease of operation that you will have. The one e-mech pointed out is awesome because it can scan transmission codes and others that cheaper scanners won't.

Also, most car manufacturers have their own service manuals which are very comprehensive and helpful. Since I work only on older BMW's, we use whats called the "Bentley Manual". It has quite literally every repair procedure you can imagine with good pictures and diagrams. Its what the BMW techs themselves refer to. Most automakers have their own version of this "Bentley Manual". Its much more convenient than running upstairs, checking online and blackening your keyboard.
(This post was last modified: 09-06-2013 04:37 PM by HonantheBarbarian.)
09-06-2013 04:37 PM
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el mechanico Offline
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RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
Oh yeah and as far as the engine stuff.. Go get a broken weed eater or chainsaw and a broken lawn mower and take the engines apart. Put them back together with new rings and make sure they run perfect. It will teach you how engines work.
09-06-2013 05:15 PM
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germanico Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
That scanner is pretty cheap for what it does Mech.

Great tip about taking apart an smaller engine. I learned everything I know about how cars work by owning a VW bug. Theres nothing in those fuckers that you cant fix yourself.

Anecdotically, there were a couple of times it broke down on me and I managed to get it running with twigs and bottle caps I found on the side of the road.
09-06-2013 08:20 PM
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TonySandos
Aliblahba Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(09-06-2013 05:15 PM)el mechanico Wrote:  Oh yeah and as far as the engine stuff.. Go get a broken weed eater or chainsaw and a broken lawn mower and take the engines apart. Put them back together with new rings and make sure they run perfect. It will teach you how engines work.

Look on Craigslist or pawn shops for project, or put an ad in the paper for free pickup.

Here's a decent starter tool box for the price:

http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-255-p...ockType=G1


   
09-06-2013 08:27 PM
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germanico Offline
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RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(09-06-2013 08:27 PM)Aliblahba Wrote:  Here's a decent starter tool box for the price:

Plus, Crafstmans are guaranteed for life. You could get some chinese shit for $10 and it will break before you get to use it.


Ive owned a couple of Haynes manuals and they are very comprehensive. Get the one for the car you own now and start from there.

http://www.haynes.com/mole

Start doing your own oil change. Once you realize how easy it is you will never want to pay for it again.
09-06-2013 09:43 PM
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LeBeau Offline
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Post: #8
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
I'm also pretty ignorant about cars, despite owning one.

What would you guys say are the most essential skills to be able to do yourself?

And what should you understand about maintenance, even if you don't end up doing that particular skill yourself?
09-06-2013 11:27 PM
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roberto Offline
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Post: #9
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(09-06-2013 11:27 PM)LeBeau Wrote:  I'm also pretty ignorant about cars, despite owning one.

What would you guys say are the most essential skills to be able to do yourself?

And what should you understand about maintenance, even if you don't end up doing that particular skill yourself?

#1 has to be to change a wheel quickly and safely. There's nothing more pathetic to see than a bloke standing by whilst a breakdown service patrolman changes his wheel for him. Remember to re-check nut torque after a few dozen miles.

Oil and filter changes will set you back about £100 at a garage, yet the parts are rarely more than £50, and usually more like £25 for older vehicles. Takes about ten minutes.

They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety- Benjamin Franklin, as if you didn't know...
04-06-2014 01:12 PM
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LaCobra Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
My recommended books are:
Auto fundamentals by Stockel, Stockel, and Johanson.
Automotive Technology by Jack Erjavec.

Then i would suggest getting a repair manual for the car you own. And if you can buy a beat up used car to practice go ahead and do it, diagnosing and making repairs by yourself on your everyday car can be a little stressful at first.

Pay attention when changing wheels for markings made by the mechanic and make sure to align them when putting the wheel back on, otherwise it will be out of balance and will rattle while driving.

Other maintenance you should perform on your car is to check tire pressure, oil and coolant level. Every once in a while check if all the lights are working.
(This post was last modified: 04-08-2014 08:56 AM by LaCobra.)
04-08-2014 08:50 AM
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TonySandos Offline
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Post: #11
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(09-06-2013 11:27 PM)LeBeau Wrote:  I'm also pretty ignorant about cars, despite owning one.

What would you guys say are the most essential skills to be able to do yourself?

And what should you understand about maintenance, even if you don't end up doing that particular skill yourself?

Tires
All the fluid changes
Air filter change
Spark plug and hose changes
Wheel coupling/bearing changes
Fuse changes
Belt changes
04-08-2014 02:29 PM
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The Beast1 Offline
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Post: #12
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
What type of car do you have? I first became a shade tree mechanic for a classic Benz. Depending on your car, you can get a forum dedicated to your make. Which helps take out the frustrating aspect of looking at two different cars.

Once you learn one car, all motors begin to make sense after that. The only annoying investment is tools.

Shalom Alechem!
(This post was last modified: 04-10-2014 06:49 AM by The Beast1.)
04-10-2014 06:49 AM
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roberto Offline
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Post: #13
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(04-08-2014 08:50 AM)LaCobra Wrote:  Pay attention when changing wheels for markings made by the mechanic and make sure to align them when putting the wheel back on, otherwise it will be out of balance and will rattle while driving.

You balance a wheel and tyre whilst they are off the car. What way round it then goes on the hub makes no difference.

They who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety- Benjamin Franklin, as if you didn't know...
04-10-2014 11:35 AM
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el mechanico Offline
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Post: #14
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(04-10-2014 11:35 AM)roberto Wrote:  
(04-08-2014 08:50 AM)LaCobra Wrote:  Pay attention when changing wheels for markings made by the mechanic and make sure to align them when putting the wheel back on, otherwise it will be out of balance and will rattle while driving.

You balance a wheel and tyre whilst they are off the car. What way round it then goes on the hub makes no difference.
That was one of the funniest things I've read here.
04-10-2014 11:41 AM
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Engineer Offline
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Post: #15
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
(09-06-2013 02:41 PM)el mechanico Wrote:  Watch youtube videos

Buy this scanner
http://www.toolfetch.com/launch-tech-301...7AodoTEAFQ

Start hooking it up on anyones car with warning lights then google the codes and read about them. Watch youtube videos on how to change whatever part you want. Get better at it then $$$

Mech, that's a nice scanner. Ever see one for sale used? I'm a cheap bastard and would prefer to drop 1 bill instead of 2.
08-13-2014 12:28 PM
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DJ-Matt Offline
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Post: #16
RE: Books on vehicular maintenance
I use a ScanGauge or an ELM27 Bluetooth OBDII box w/android device to read codes...

"The Carousel Stops For No Man" - Tuthmosis
There is no salvation outside the Church
08-13-2014 03:47 PM
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