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Lifter's Lounge
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Raccoonpaw Offline
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Post: #1526
RE: Lifter's Lounge
So I am back on my low carb grind. Also, coming to the realization that diet soda really keeps you stagnant in terms of losing weight. When I was 265 I drank a lot of regular soda and decided to drink water or seltzer. When I went down to 195, I decided to drink diet soda because I was like why not? After a few months, I noticed I am 219 and I've been stuck since because of my "addiction". I went back to seltzer. I am 219, I went to go down to 190.

In terms of working out, I slow burn Mondays and Thurday's. I do full body workouts, 1 set till failure at about a certain time limit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUVZRUi1zWk an example of what I do. Like today I did:

125lbs shoulder press, 1 set @ 1:22
250lbs Rows, 1 set @ 1:26
170lbs ab twist right side @ 1:29 and left 1:23 (1 set each side)
355lbs calf raise machine @ 1:26 1 set
155lbs Arm curls @ 1:13 1 set

an example of what I am doing. So I am wondering, my goal is to get "big", so what should I add during my off days?
11-16-2015 10:22 PM
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Oz. Offline
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Post: #1527
RE: Lifter's Lounge
Bought a kettle-bell did a leg routine and I'm more sore than on regular leg days.

Good shit

(11-15-2014 09:06 AM)Little Dark Wrote:  This thread is not going in the direction I was hoping for.
11-16-2015 10:40 PM
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Post: #1528
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-16-2015 10:11 PM)Anabasis to Desta Wrote:  Just hit 275 lbs on Bench for 5 reps!

For the first time, my Bench is higher than my Squat at 255 for 5 reps.

I know this can't be healthy and might cause muscle imbalances. But i just can't seem to get stronger on my squats. I've checked my form but I tend to bend over forward no matter how much i try to stay in form.

Are there any isolation exercises that could help me with bringing up my squat numbers or at least improve my form?

My gym buddy has a more balanced Bench-Squat-Deadlift ratio & looks better as in like more streamlined, athletic and healthy despite benching and dead-lifting way less than i do.

So is it safe to say that if your major lift ratios are out of balance, it could affect aesthetics?

Firstly, congratulations, that is a very impressive lift.

It's an interesting point, but aesthetics are affected by more than just what you lift, and the ratios between the lifts may not be so important in that regard. It goes without saying that if you are very weak at a lift, the relevant muscle group may be under developed. However, your natural levers and muscle insertion points will likely play a bigger role than your raw strength.

Taking myself for example, I have never benched more than 220lbs, although perhaps I could for a max. However, just last week after not barbell squatting for a month, I was able to squat over 450lbs starting the rep from parallel. Despite my back squat being more than twice my bench, I do not look particularly unbalanced aesthetically. I simply have natural strength and good levers in my legs, back and core, and always have done. By contrast, I don't have great levers or muscle insertions for pressing, and have always had to struggle to gain anything resembling strength there. I don't have a big chest by any means, but it doesn't look particularly out of proportion.

To try to illustrate what I mean, compare the picture above of Powell at 194 or whatever he is, at 6'3, with this recent picture of The Rock, at the same height, but 40lbs or so heavier (I believe). Despite carrying dramatically more muscle mass, he does not have, and could never have, the same full and developed chest that Powell has.

[Image: dwayne%2B1.jpg]
11-17-2015 06:10 AM
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Post: #1529
RE: Lifter's Lounge
You're supposed to bend forward when you do heavy squats. To be more precise, your torso should come forward naturally as you sit back. It's your knees that are not supposed to come forward. But if you are coming forward too much (to where you feel like you don't have control/balance), then it might be a core strength issue.
11-17-2015 07:15 AM
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VincentVinturi Offline
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Post: #1530
RE: Lifter's Lounge
^^^
This was a big realization for me.

I was playing with wall squats and it dawned on me that sitting all the way back makes you fall over if you aren't cantilevering with a bend in the waist.

I guess it's simple mechanics but it's not so simple in practice if you don't have experienced lifters around to coach you!

I also took it as a cue that my lower back was hurting after a medium-heavy set, which shouldn't be the case if you're doing things right and you don't have some pre-existing issue.

So I played with bending at the waist and I played with the cantilevering .

What do you know, my lower back stopped hurting.


Also had a major squat epiphany a few days back.

On my setups I was taking a big breath, squeezing the bar hard, and compressing my core before getting under the bar.

Then I was unracking, walking out and letting out most of my air.

This was unzipping all the tension I'd worked so hard to generate before getting under the bar.

When I realized that, I did the same thing but after walking out I exhaled just a tiny bit of air, re-inhaled and did my set.

I'm noticeably tighter now and it feels safer.

Kind of makes sense because when you're tight with 100kgs on your back you're bracing for the load.

But if you go loose it's going to be hard to tighten back up again from scratch with all that weight on your back.

Now I'm playing with the ideal amount of breath to take during the setup and after the walk out because I get pretty lightheaded sometimes and have to chill for a few seconds before starting the squat.

Any tips?

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(This post was last modified: 11-17-2015 01:27 PM by VincentVinturi.)
11-17-2015 01:20 PM
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RexImperator Offline
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Post: #1531
RE: Lifter's Lounge
Yeah keep your abs/core tight during the lift. I had a problem with that, too. You will see some guys take a bunch of very short breaths during heavy squats in order not to relax the midesection.

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(This post was last modified: 11-17-2015 02:43 PM by RexImperator.)
11-17-2015 02:42 PM
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StrikeBack Offline
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Post: #1532
RE: Lifter's Lounge
I think I covered that in the Squat thread too. Yes you're meant to hold most of the air in, and only take short sharp breaths into your belly (diaphragmatic breathing). At first you may feel light-headed if you're not conditioned for it, due to the sharp rise in blood pressure. You are now using high tension techniques to lift heavy weights, that's what it feels like. Smile It is also why you don't train for strength with too many reps.

When you get stronger though, you will need less tight breathing for the same weight, and reserve the really tight breathing technique for top weights.

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11-17-2015 05:16 PM
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Agastya Offline
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Post: #1533
RE: Lifter's Lounge
If your spines are getting fried with deadlifting or squatting, or your body is just burned out with powerlifts for a bit, I highly recommend taking a month or two to use the rowing machine. The rowing movement is essentially a bodyweight powerclean, and builds a lot of stability and strength in the hips, lower back, and legs. It's low impact and probably won't injure you unless your form is absolute garbage. Rowing also builds a lot of flexibility(obviously great for squats and deads), and mimics both of those movements, helping you develop more precise form. Plus it's a great source of cardio; rowing makes you a lot better at both running and biking, and gives you enough endurance to fuck for several hours.

I've been squatting and deadlifting a little too often for the past couple of months, and the rowing machine is a great way to recuperate and build an accessory form of fitness.
11-17-2015 06:31 PM
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WanderingSoul Offline
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Post: #1534
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-15-2015 09:33 PM)StrikeBack Wrote:  
(11-14-2015 09:30 PM)Mess O. Wrote:  I might've asked this earlier, but I couldn't re-track as to where . . . but it seems as if Mark Rippetoe gets bad press here pretty consistently. I felt that his book is among the most comprehensive volumes I've seen so far. What am I missing?

What else have you read?

I can recommend:

Dan John (anything)

Pavel Tsatouline (anything)

Marty Gallagher (The Purposeful Primitive)

Josh Bryant (Bench Press: The Science)

Mike Tuchscherer (warning: nerd overload!)

Jim Wendler's 5/3/1 series

Once you've actually read a bit, you'll realise that Starting Strength is not that good.

Hannibal Wrote:Not everyone wants to or needs to train like a proto powerlifter.

No powerlifter except the mediocre ones (even at local level) actually does Starting Strength. We don't like to get fat and weak either. Also, we need to squat to legal depth in competition, which you usually cannot with the SS technique.


Of course a powerlifter wouldn't do SS, it's a beginners program.

I think SS is a very good program for someone brand new to lifting who is looking to put on size and gain strength. The diet portion isn't great, but the lifting routine will absolutely give you good size and strength gains if you eat enough and get enough sleep.

It's what I started on and then went on to MadCow. I've hit maxes of a 242lb bench, 365lbx3 squat, and As of tomorrow I'll hit a 405x1 deadlift, assuming nothing catastrophic goes on.

I think SS gets way too much praise online, but also a lot of hate. It's a basic beginners program for learning the lifts, and putting on size and strength. For me it worked really well for that.

You give a lot of good info StrikeBack. I'd like to hear what you would recommend to a brand new beginner looking to put on size and strength as opposed to SS that is much better?
11-17-2015 08:22 PM
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RexImperator Offline
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Post: #1535
RE: Lifter's Lounge
Starting Strength is oriented towards the general strength trainee, and especially young guys starting out who need to bulk up for athletic purposes (i.e. American Football). It's based on Bill Starr's 5x5 Strongest Shall Survive. Rippetoe has zero interest in physique type stuff.

Once they are out of the fast novice gains, it seems like most SS guys move on to 5/3/1.

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(This post was last modified: 11-17-2015 09:13 PM by RexImperator.)
11-17-2015 09:09 PM
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Truth Teller Offline
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Post: #1536
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-14-2015 09:30 PM)Mess O. Wrote:  I might've asked this earlier, but I couldn't re-track as to where . . . but it seems as if Mark Rippetoe gets bad press here pretty consistently. I felt that his book is among the most comprehensive volumes I've seen so far. What am I missing?

So I say this thinking of three things:

1. Rippetoe is overly enamored with the low bar squat
2. He can't teach power cleans worth a damn.
3. (more personal) I hate the Olympic Press.


The low bar squat, for almost everyone except powerlifters, is a waste of time. Yes, Rippetoe will bark about "how you get stronger" with it. So he recommends it for Olympic lifters and pretty much everyone else too.

What he doesn't realize (or doesn't care about) is that the position for the low bar squat is DEADLY to a properly executed snatch or a properly executed clean and jerk. If you bend forward, you will lose the bar in the low position, especially if it's heavy (hell, even if it isn't heavy). Over the years, that neural pattern builds up so you can't clean or snatch with the squat style, which almost every competitive lifter in the world uses (outside of a handful of Masters' level competitors, probably). So you're forced to use the split style. The reason the split is so out of vogue is you have to pull the bar higher... you can't go as heavy. Which often means you can't win.

The "jump and shrug" method of power cleans is just a shit show. Bent over rows are far easier to teach and learn.

Finally, I just hate the Olympic Press on principle. It took one of the greatest tests of strength for a man (shove this heavy ass weight overhead) and made it into a quick lift.

"For you yourselves are aware that the Day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night" (1 Thess. 5:2)
11-17-2015 09:23 PM
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RexImperator Offline
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Post: #1537
RE: Lifter's Lounge
I think those are good criticisms.

I don't think there is any training benefit to low bar squats. They allow nominally larger weight but since the lever arm is reduced by lowering the bar position the torque exerted is the same. Hence powerlifters use them for a bigger total.

That said, that's what I learned so I've stuck with it.

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et Thybrim multo spumantem sanguine cerno
11-17-2015 10:04 PM
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Hannibal Offline
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Post: #1538
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-17-2015 09:23 PM)Truth Teller Wrote:  Finally, I just hate the Olympic Press on principle. It took one of the greatest tests of strength for a man (shove this heavy ass weight overhead) and made it into a quick lift.

I agree with everything this man says.

The olympic press is retarded. If you're going to get a beginner to do a quick press, you might as well show him the push press. That sway back then push forward motion looks like an accident waiting to happen. I have no idea why Rippetoe didn't go for the push press instead.

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(This post was last modified: 11-17-2015 10:23 PM by Hannibal.)
11-17-2015 10:21 PM
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StrikeBack Offline
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Post: #1539
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-17-2015 08:22 PM)RioNomad Wrote:  Of course a powerlifter wouldn't do SS, it's a beginners program.

A novice powerlifter shouldn't do SS either because both the technique and the programming are wrong for strength.

Rippetoe's deadlift technique is weak (too top heavy and back dominant), his squat is unsuitable for general athletic training and weightlifting, and in fact is not good for powerlifting either. His bench press technique is the only thing that is generally acceptable.

The programming is pretty bad too. Here's the routine: http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/F...g_Strength

One way to write a program (and thus assess one) is to look at the number of lifts (NL) per competition lift.

If you do SS for 4 weeks, 3 sessions per week, you'll have 6 of Workout A and 6 of Workout B. This means, for the 3 powerlifts, the NLs are:

Squat: 6*3*5*2 = 180 NL
Bench: 6*3*5 = 90 NL
Deadlift: 6*1*5 = 30 NL

The ratio between the lifts is wrong for powerlifting, it should be around Squat: Bench : Deadlift ~= 2:3:1 or Bench being the highest volume, Squat in the middle and Deadlift lowest. It's also wrong for physique as well, this is why you have guys on SS for a long time having big legs and small upper body. Just look at the ratio, it gets obvious. Even if you add the Press and Chins, it's still very low upper body volume.

The total volume (working NL) in a month is also way too low in general.

Another thing to assess is intensity. Since SS is telling the lifter to go basically for 5RM every session, adding weights all the time, this is too much intensity for a novice lifter to learn proper technique. 3 heavy squat sessions a week is for a very advanced lifter, not a novice one. A novice on SS will constantly think about struggling under the bar, not technique. SS for a novice lifter is the equivalent of a newbie boxer getting told to smash the heavy bags or full contact sparring 3 days a week. A novice lifter should be lifting at higher rep ranges (8-10) most of the time, and shouldn't be squatting heavy 3 times a week. They should squat one heavy and one light.

Novice powerlifters are often on the classic powerlifting cycle which looks something like this for each lift:

Heavy day: 3x10 then 3x8, 3x6, 3x5, 3x2 (each for a couple of weeks, totalling about 10-12 weeks) then competition.

Light day: similar rep range but with significantly lighter weights

Quote:I think SS is a very good program for someone brand new to lifting who is looking to put on size and gain strength. The diet portion isn't great, but the lifting routine will absolutely give you good size and strength gains if you eat enough and get enough sleep.

It's what I started on and then went on to MadCow. I've hit maxes of a 242lb bench, 365lbx3 squat, and As of tomorrow I'll hit a 405x1 deadlift, assuming nothing catastrophic goes on.

I think SS gets way too much praise online, but also a lot of hate. It's a basic beginners program for learning the lifts, and putting on size and strength. For me it worked really well for that.

At the start, as an untrained novice, doing any kind of barbell program will improve your strength and physique. The real trick is what will your progress be AFTER that initial phase. I've seen SS cause so many problems and plateaus down the track that I do not like it for beginners. Most tend to get stuck at certain weights that, while somewhat impressive in a regular gym, are well below what they are truly capable of.

Quote:You give a lot of good info StrikeBack. I'd like to hear what you would recommend to a brand new beginner looking to put on size and strength as opposed to SS that is much better?

I've addressed this in a thread here before: https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-47523.html

In fact I remember answering this question from you directly too! Tongue

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-47523...pid1023722

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(This post was last modified: 11-17-2015 10:58 PM by StrikeBack.)
11-17-2015 10:49 PM
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Saweeep Offline
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Post: #1540
RE: Lifter's Lounge
Absolute beginners should always do 3x3x10 all over body per week.

It's just the most sensible thing to do.
11-17-2015 11:13 PM
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Post: #1541
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-17-2015 10:04 PM)RexImperator Wrote:  I think those are good criticisms.

I don't think there is any training benefit to low bar squats. They allow nominally larger weight but since the lever arm is reduced by lowering the bar position the torque exerted is the same. Hence powerlifters use them for a bigger total.

That said, that's what I learned so I've stuck with it.

Well, the other thing that Rippetoe won't tell you is that parallel (i.e. what he calls full) squats will tighten the hips and hamstrings as time progresses. That's the other reason why low bar squats are worthless for Olympic lifting.

"For you yourselves are aware that the Day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night" (1 Thess. 5:2)
11-18-2015 12:38 AM
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Post: #1542
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-17-2015 10:21 PM)Hannibal Wrote:  I agree with everything this man says.

The olympic press is retarded. If you're going to get a beginner to do a quick press, you might as well show him the push press. That sway back then push forward motion looks like an accident waiting to happen. I have no idea why Rippetoe didn't go for the push press instead.

The Olympic Press allows an experienced lifter to put up significantly more weight in the overhead press than he would with a strict press. That's why it became popular in the first place, and it's also part of why the clean and press was dropped from Olympic lifting.

It requires very exact timing (you have to lay back at exactly the right moment). It is not an easy movement to learn or to teach.

Rippetoe largely teaches it because Bill Starr, his mentor, taught the Olympic press.

Here's an article you guys would enjoy: http://library.la84.org/SportsLibrary/JS...H2803d.pdf

"For you yourselves are aware that the Day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night" (1 Thess. 5:2)
11-18-2015 12:48 AM
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WanderingSoul Offline
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Post: #1543
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-17-2015 10:49 PM)StrikeBack Wrote:  
(11-17-2015 08:22 PM)RioNomad Wrote:  Of course a powerlifter wouldn't do SS, it's a beginners program.

A novice powerlifter shouldn't do SS either because both the technique and the programming are wrong for strength.

Rippetoe's deadlift technique is weak (too top heavy and back dominant), his squat is unsuitable for general athletic training and weightlifting, and in fact is not good for powerlifting either. His bench press technique is the only thing that is generally acceptable.

The programming is pretty bad too. Here's the routine: http://startingstrength.wikia.com/wiki/F...g_Strength

One way to write a program (and thus assess one) is to look at the number of lifts (NL) per competition lift.

If you do SS for 4 weeks, 3 sessions per week, you'll have 6 of Workout A and 6 of Workout B. This means, for the 3 powerlifts, the NLs are:

Squat: 6*3*5*2 = 180 NL
Bench: 6*3*5 = 90 NL
Deadlift: 6*1*5 = 30 NL

The ratio between the lifts is wrong for powerlifting, it should be around Squat: Bench : Deadlift ~= 2:3:1 or Bench being the highest volume, Squat in the middle and Deadlift lowest. It's also wrong for physique as well, this is why you have guys on SS for a long time having big legs and small upper body. Just look at the ratio, it gets obvious. Even if you add the Press and Chins, it's still very low upper body volume.

The total volume (working NL) in a month is also way too low in general.

Another thing to assess is intensity. Since SS is telling the lifter to go basically for 5RM every session, adding weights all the time, this is too much intensity for a novice lifter to learn proper technique. 3 heavy squat sessions a week is for a very advanced lifter, not a novice one. A novice on SS will constantly think about struggling under the bar, not technique. SS for a novice lifter is the equivalent of a newbie boxer getting told to smash the heavy bags or full contact sparring 3 days a week. A novice lifter should be lifting at higher rep ranges (8-10) most of the time, and shouldn't be squatting heavy 3 times a week. They should squat one heavy and one light.

Novice powerlifters are often on the classic powerlifting cycle which looks something like this for each lift:

Heavy day: 3x10 then 3x8, 3x6, 3x5, 3x2 (each for a couple of weeks, totalling about 10-12 weeks) then competition.

Light day: similar rep range but with significantly lighter weights

Quote:I think SS is a very good program for someone brand new to lifting who is looking to put on size and gain strength. The diet portion isn't great, but the lifting routine will absolutely give you good size and strength gains if you eat enough and get enough sleep.

It's what I started on and then went on to MadCow. I've hit maxes of a 242lb bench, 365lbx3 squat, and As of tomorrow I'll hit a 405x1 deadlift, assuming nothing catastrophic goes on.

I think SS gets way too much praise online, but also a lot of hate. It's a basic beginners program for learning the lifts, and putting on size and strength. For me it worked really well for that.

At the start, as an untrained novice, doing any kind of barbell program will improve your strength and physique. The real trick is what will your progress be AFTER that initial phase. I've seen SS cause so many problems and plateaus down the track that I do not like it for beginners. Most tend to get stuck at certain weights that, while somewhat impressive in a regular gym, are well below what they are truly capable of.

Quote:You give a lot of good info StrikeBack. I'd like to hear what you would recommend to a brand new beginner looking to put on size and strength as opposed to SS that is much better?

I've addressed this in a thread here before: https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-47523.html

In fact I remember answering this question from you directly too! Tongue

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-47523...pid1023722

As soon as I went to check this thread I remembered that you'd answered it before lol.
11-18-2015 01:24 AM
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Kieran Offline
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Post: #1544
RE: Lifter's Lounge
Olympic press is very difficult for a beginner to learn from a book - ridiculous.

Benching with a J-curve is far better than a straight line bar path, as Rippetoe teaches, in my opinion.

Also straight sets across are probably the worst thing I've ever tried for strength gains.
11-18-2015 05:55 AM
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RexImperator Offline
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RE: Lifter's Lounge
Quote:The ratio between the lifts is wrong for powerlifting, it should be around Squat: Bench : Deadlift ~= 2:3:1 or Bench being the highest volume, Squat in the middle and Deadlift lowest. It's also wrong for physique as well, this is why you have guys on SS for a long time having big legs and small upper body

It's a general strength program for building strength/mass fast. And legs grow faster. Overall strength is also most strongly correlated with back squat performance compared to any other lift. Generally, bench pressing so much is not considered very healthy for shoulders. Hence SS has the overhead press programmed 1:1 with the overhead press. A lot of these criticisms are addressed in Practical Programming.

If I were doing it over I would probably do the Greyskull LP, which is similar but with some tweaks.

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11-18-2015 10:15 AM
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Post: #1546
RE: Lifter's Lounge
When I was starting to lift seriously about a year ago, I read Starting Strength but for whatever reason didn't adhere to the program.

Then I found Strong Lifts 5x5 and that got me in the gym more than any program had before it.

Super simple program, super simple iPhone app, and a focus on just a few main lifts.

The volume combined with linear progression & periodization helped me figure out technique errors as I attempted heavier lifts at a slow enough pace that I didn't get injured to any substantial degree this whole year.

I also found the site to have really clear step-by-step guides on the main lifts.

For a newbie like me adherence was a major concern and SL did its job in that department.

My Latest Book On How To Make Money Online By Offering A Service Check It Out Here
11-18-2015 11:16 AM
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RexImperator Offline
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Post: #1547
RE: Lifter's Lounge
As a novice, the best program is the one you stick to.

Bella, horrida bella
et Thybrim multo spumantem sanguine cerno
11-18-2015 10:25 PM
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Hades Offline
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Post: #1548
RE: Lifter's Lounge
I decided to say screw it sometime this week and just go for a zero carb (or very low carb) diet. I won't bother with carb refeeds until I see abs, after which will be a weekly thing.

College life is great and all, beer and pizza, but slowly getting fatter is irritating if you know anything about nutrition. What good is knowing something if you do nothing about it?

So yeah, it's just meat, cheese, eggs, and olive oil for me for a good long while. The keto calculator on the internet suggests I should be at the leanest I've ever been in about five or six months.

I'm in the throes of keto flu and brain fog which blows but it's not worse than being a fatass.
(This post was last modified: 11-19-2015 12:24 PM by Hades.)
11-19-2015 12:22 PM
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Ingocnito Offline
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Post: #1549
RE: Lifter's Lounge
(11-19-2015 12:22 PM)Hades Wrote:  I decided to say screw it sometime this week and just go for a zero carb (or very low carb) diet. I won't bother with carb refeeds until I see abs, after which will be a weekly thing.

College life is great and all, beer and pizza, but slowly getting fatter is irritating if you know anything about nutrition. What good is knowing something if you do nothing about it?

So yeah, it's just meat, cheese, eggs, and olive oil for me for a good long while. The keto calculator on the internet suggests I should be at the leanest I've ever been in about five or six months.

I'm in the throes of keto flu and brain fog which blows but it's not worse than being a fatass.

Friend of mine whose ex pro hockey player bulked up and put on quite a bit of muscle last spring, brought a little belly fat with it he couldn't easily shed even after adding in cardio... one of the fittest guys I know.

Said he bought an herbal colon cleanse pills he took late one week. Told me he shit himself silly all weekend but lost apx. 12 lbs and went from a 4 pack to close to shredded in short order. Not saying it's for everyone, but it serves dual purpose. Cleans your system and drops a lot of extra crap you don't need. Just be prepared to ride the shitter like a pro.
11-19-2015 01:15 PM
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Chaos Offline
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Post: #1550
RE: Lifter's Lounge
Just wanted to check in since it's exactly one year since I started hitting the weights.

Reading RVF is what inspired me to start lifting.

Therefore,I feel it's my duty and responsibility to share my stats since all the info and knowledge I've gathered about lifting and nutrition has come from you guys in this thread. You have spoken and I have taken action.

So, here is what have happened...

Height: 190cm.

November 2014:
Weight: 82kg

Deadlift: 120kg
Squat: 100kg
Bench: 70kg

November 2015:
Weight: 94kg

Deadlift: 190kg
Squat: 160kg
Bench: 110kg

Been lifting minimum 3x week.
Been off in total seven weeks due to sickness and small injuries ( not from lifting).
And I'm definitely not fatter than a year ago.

Good or bad, up to you.
You are the ones to blame Wink
11-19-2015 02:35 PM
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