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Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
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LeBeau Offline
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Post: #26
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
(11-15-2014 08:30 PM)Mentavious Wrote:  If you want I can put together a short workout list to break you in.

Sprinting will increase your squat due to the increased connection between fast twitch fibers-brain, overall gain in leg muscle development, increase in bone strength.

Sprinting data sheet would be great, I'm looking to add these to my training as well.
11-18-2014 08:25 PM
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Post: #27
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
(11-15-2014 08:30 PM)Mentavious Wrote:  If you want I can put together a short workout list to break you in.

Absolutely. I'm always open to do new ideas. And my program is flexible enough to throw other random shit into the mix when I feel like it.

(11-18-2014 06:15 PM)youngblazer Wrote:  
(11-18-2014 02:26 PM)StrengthBySonny Wrote:  Horrible for your knees and lower back in the long term.
Read this:
http://fabfitover40.com/2014/10/10/runni...heelchair/

This applies to distance running on hard surfaces, not sprinting, and definitely not sprinting on grass fields.

Exactly, I do mine barefoot on grass and sand, making sure to run on the balls of my feet. Works the hell out of my calves. I had a bad ankle injury when I was younger that used to flare up every time I tried to take up jogging. Having no issue with it when I run this way.

You won't catch me sprinting on concrete any time soon.

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11-18-2014 09:57 PM
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StrikeBack Offline
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Post: #28
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
I'd advise not to do sprints and plyometrics on heavy lifting days. Only do them when you're fresh. If you do them after you've exhausted your body lifting, you're inviting injuries.

For the same reason, doing sprints or plyometrics (very intense on the whole body particularly joints and tendons) tabata-style is dumb. The inventor of plyometrics (Verkhoshansky) strongly advised against doing them while fatigued. Rest, recover fully, then go. It's about performance and maximizing your CNS response (i.e explosive force production), not about fat loss or fatigue addiction. For the latter, there are safer exercises.

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11-18-2014 10:18 PM
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Ryre Offline
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Post: #29
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
(11-18-2014 06:15 PM)youngblazer Wrote:  
(11-18-2014 02:26 PM)StrengthBySonny Wrote:  Horrible for your knees and lower back in the long term.
Read this:
http://fabfitover40.com/2014/10/10/runni...heelchair/

This applies to distance running on hard surfaces, not sprinting, and definitely not sprinting on grass fields.

Yeah, I hate jogging, beats up my knees. Sprinting is a different stride, striking on the ball of the foot not the heel. Doesn't bug my joints. For that matter even basketball is easier on my joints than jogging on pavement; most off the running is short dashes on your toes, like sprinting.
11-19-2014 01:07 PM
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Post: #30
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
5 sets of burpees 25reps :3
11-19-2014 01:40 PM
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KC4 Offline
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Post: #31
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
How much does sprints help with gaining leg size?
11-19-2014 03:47 PM
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Post: #32
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
delete

A man is only as faithful as his options-Chris Rock
(This post was last modified: 11-19-2014 05:32 PM by Mentavious.)
11-19-2014 05:08 PM
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Post: #33
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
(11-19-2014 03:47 PM)KC4 Wrote:  How much does sprints help with gaining leg size?

The most I ever squatted in highschool was around 225. My legs were larger than many of the lineman on the football team. Sprinting is pure power as the more muscular your legs which generates more power and leads to being faster.

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11-19-2014 05:32 PM
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Mentavious Online
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RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
Remember when you sprint the goal is to get up to maximum velocity within the first 15 meters or so and then maintain that velocity for however long that sprint is.

A good start for beginners would be:

A nice warmup of half a mile (I always hated running miles when I was younger)
Some static stretching (20 seconds on each limb or stretch)
basic Plyometrocis like rhythm skips, high knees, butt kicks, power skips, speed bounds, double leg hops, and ankle bounces. Notice how all of those exercises are power development and explosive power.

Actual sprinting workouts:

Build ups to 60m, 80m, 120m, etc etc. basically start at a jogging speed and work your way up to full speed by the time you hit the 60 meter mark, 80 meter mark, etc etc.
Obviously there are uphill/downhill sprints
speed play are similar to build ups but instead of stopping after 60 meters you go into a jog. So for a 300 meter run...build up for 60 meters, straight sprint for 60 meters, decelerate and then build up for 60 meters, spring for 60 meters, and then decelerate until a stop for the last 60 meters.
Interval sprints: 3x100 meter sprints under 15 seconds, with 5 minutes rest in between sets

Just some examples.

Then you could do upperbody workouts afterward

most common injuries for you guys would be knee problems and I.T. Band. This is why stretching and warmup is very important for injury prevention. Notice how 1/2 my program is stretching and warming up? Other than that improved and equal strength between the front and back of the thigh and greater flexibility of the leg and lower back. As for the I.T.Band just stretch that ligament and do warmups. Can't really help you on soft tissue injury prevention other than don't spring everyday and don't do leg exercises before sprinting workouts.

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(This post was last modified: 11-19-2014 05:59 PM by Mentavious.)
11-19-2014 05:52 PM
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Nascimento Offline
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Post: #35
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
I've experimented with sprint training before since due to playing some competitive footy in the past. Nowadays I don't sprint anymore because there are diminishing returns for me if I'm not playing sports like I used to.

Although sprint training from time to time is excellent for optimizing muscle performance, like no other. And you'll build a certain fast twitch element in your muscles that last through time, as long as you maintain general conditioning by always walking, doing some aerobic activity in the gym from time to time, and weight training. It's also rewarding to know I can join a pick up game of american football or basketball and wind guys who are much more skilled than me at the sport but don't have the same background in explosive training.

Sprinting has different benefits in my experience as opposed to resistance training. The latter will have more noticeable improvements in body composition and the former will be more performance based. Sprinting will improve resistance training output though whereas resistance training will do less for sprinting.

I'd say they are good to include in a training regime, almost as a beneficial distraction. I wouldn't do them more than once a week, even for myself a 21 year old recovery is difficult. Sprinting when done right should expend the muscles more than any other form of training and recovery should be appropriate. Any more than once a week is for track athletes and their training regime focuses more on running than weight training so that makes sense.

I like to do tabada on a stationary bike from time to time to maintain that sprint training element. But nothing compares to running on a track or flat ground. Proper sprint training cannot occur on a treadmill or stationary bike. The bike has certain movement limitations and actually running the sprints requires much more of your body and it's not so much about the speed you run at but the intensity. Although level 8 on the treadmill might be your fastest running speed so you could do it on the treadmill your focus should be 1000% on maximal effort and no portion of that focus should be used to calibrate whether you are running straight and carefully on the treadmill or not.

When I used to run in the track I did something like this:
Warmup - 10 minutes of slow jogging and more importantly a variety of dynamic stretches
2 minutes fast jog/2 minutes slow jog, twice with some quick starts to get the muscles ready for 110% -- 8 minutes
20 seconds sprint/ 40 seconds slow slow jog ,4 times, up to 6 (higher conditioning dependent) -- 4-6 minutes
cooldown

I can't stress dynamic stretches enough, you have to properly prepare your entire skeletal muscle system for sprinting. I've pulled muscles before during the sprint even when I thought I had warmed up enough, so now I put more effort into the warmup.

Speed is not as important as intensity. You will push your oxygen consumption level when you do this. Although overtime don't be surprised if you find yourself flying on a track when compared to when you first started. When I first started doing this stuff in high school for sports I wasn't ever the fastest on the field, I always had opponents beating me in speed and I play a wingback position that requires speed to keep up with the opponent wingers. Needless to say, a couple years later playing in games with university level athletes I was able to keep up and in many cases outmatch opponents in speed, despite most players being higher skilled athletes than me (I never took it far enough to compete varsity level).

You have to lay it all out on those sprints, those short intervals really have to be 200% effort.

There's other benefits I haven't mentioned involved that you could imagine from sprinting. Improved pain tolerance, trains your will, among the rush you get once you're done.

------

I had been meaning to talk about sprinting for some time, it's always been a topic I've enjoyed. /end rant
(This post was last modified: 11-22-2014 08:46 AM by Nascimento.)
11-22-2014 08:32 AM
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Post: #36
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
(11-19-2014 05:52 PM)Mentavious Wrote:  Remember when you sprint the goal is to get up to maximum velocity within the first 15 meters or so and then maintain that velocity for however long that sprint is.

A good start for beginners would be:

A nice warmup of half a mile (I always hated running miles when I was younger)
Some static stretching (20 seconds on each limb or stretch)
basic Plyometrocis like rhythm skips, high knees, butt kicks, power skips, speed bounds, double leg hops, and ankle bounces. Notice how all of those exercises are power development and explosive power.

Actual sprinting workouts:

Build ups to 60m, 80m, 120m, etc etc. basically start at a jogging speed and work your way up to full speed by the time you hit the 60 meter mark, 80 meter mark, etc etc.
Obviously there are uphill/downhill sprints
speed play are similar to build ups but instead of stopping after 60 meters you go into a jog. So for a 300 meter run...build up for 60 meters, straight sprint for 60 meters, decelerate and then build up for 60 meters, spring for 60 meters, and then decelerate until a stop for the last 60 meters.
Interval sprints: 3x100 meter sprints under 15 seconds, with 5 minutes rest in between sets

Just some examples.

Then you could do upperbody workouts afterward

most common injuries for you guys would be knee problems and I.T. Band. This is why stretching and warmup is very important for injury prevention. Notice how 1/2 my program is stretching and warming up? Other than that improved and equal strength between the front and back of the thigh and greater flexibility of the leg and lower back. As for the I.T.Band just stretch that ligament and do warmups. Can't really help you on soft tissue injury prevention other than don't spring everyday and don't do leg exercises before sprinting workouts.

^ I've been doing the speed play routine above. I like it because I can set my goals beforehand and use the track markers. I find with just sprint/rest using the field markers I am too lazy about doing the reps hard.

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11-27-2014 09:01 AM
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youngblazer Offline
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Post: #37
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
Nothing makes my heart pound harder than a set of sprints until I hit a failure point. I fucking love it.
11-27-2014 10:37 AM
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Post: #38
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
I really like kettlebell swings as an alternative to sprints.

Like sprints, you can do just one 5 min session of intervals every few days and still get mega aerobic and anaerobic benefits.

You can do 30sec on /30 sec off, or just one long set, working up to say 120 reps, or my favourite (...least-favourite, when Im not up to the intensity) 40 sec on, 20 sec off.

Advantages:

-Low Impact. No knee problems.
-Do them at home
-Build up your sexual power and stamina. seriously after a few months of progression on KB swings, you become a sexual jackhammer. The movement is an explosive hip thrust...girls will be like "what.. the.. omg. ommGGG..!!" Wink
-Easily to progress by adding reps, sets, reducing rest periods

-Builds alot of muscle and strength, surprisingly (probably because it's explosive). Your ass and hams will grow, your deadlift will go up (Although sprints do this too).

Disadvantages:

-Suck for travelling. Few gyms have them, so have to buy a new one in each place.
-At some point you need to increase the weight and use a new KB
(This post was last modified: 12-01-2014 07:30 AM by RichieP.)
12-01-2014 07:15 AM
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TrifeLife Offline
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Post: #39
RE: Fitting Sprints Into Your Training Regimen
In my opinion sprints are the most under utilized exercise. In terms of fitness and physique, sprinting has the highest ROI of any form of exercise (or tied with squats at least). If you invest around 30 minutes a week in sprinting you will notice a tangible bump in your baseline energy level and musculature. It'll improve your endurance more effectively than jogging will, in 25% of the time. You'll notice the difference after just a couple weeks.

Humans are born to run. Every one of us is capable of running fast if you do it consistently. I like knowing that if for any reason I have to get out of dodge quick I'm faster than 98% of the population, because nobody trains for speed. When was the last time you opened it up and ran full tilt, even if only for a few strides? If you can't run a couple wind sprints without your legs turning to jello then you aren't fit, period. Don't care about your weight room numbers, or how many miles you log on the treadmill each week.

I love lifting, and am in the gym 3 times a week every week. I'll tell you, the endorphin rush high I get from sprinting is better than the weight room equivalent. Especially shirtless in the park, sun out and barefoot on some fresh green grass.

Here's my advice for those who don't yet sprint but want to reap the huge benefits: keep it simple. Short and sweet, especially if your BF% is higher than you want it to be. Forget any sort of plan that looks like this: 5x60meters, 5x100, meters 3x200 meters or whatever. That's miserable, which is a recipe for skipped workouts in the near future.

This should be your goal: Run as fast as you can, at least once, every single week no matter what. No other movement requires peak output from so many different muscles at the same time, so your body won't be used to it. You need to acclimate your body to this state of maximal exertion, so consistency week after week is the important thing. So, make it as painless as possible.

Here's what I do when I'm starting from square one:
- start jogging
- after a minute or so as you loosen up a bit pick up your speed and think about your stride opening up
- about a minute longer and I'm breathing a little heavier, feeling some muscle fatigue
- slow to a walk for about a minute
- stop and do leg swings, front to back and side to side, quick hamstring and quad stretch
- start jogging again, put on a song that gets me jacked up
- increase speed so that I hit top speed in about 50 meters (this is relatively slow acceleration, per the 'painless as possible' philosophy)
- hold top speed as long as I can until legs get wobbly and balance starts to go (doesn't take long if you haven't sprinted in a while)
- slow to a walk for as long as it takes you to catch your breath (at least a minute)
- repeat as many times as you want (I usually only do about 6 'reps', 3 if I'm just starting out)

This can be done in less than 20 minutes. I do it twice a week these days, but do it once and you will feel different. 20 minutes a week to change your body in a serious way and move closer towards optimizing your athleticism.
(This post was last modified: 04-01-2017 07:12 PM by TrifeLife.)
04-01-2017 07:00 PM
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