Read The Forum Rules: We have a clear set of rules to keep the forum running smoothly. Click here to review them.

Post Reply 
Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Author Message
TheWastelander Offline
Ostrich
****

Posts: 2,458
Joined: Mar 2014
Reputation: 50
Post: #51
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/1...women.html

There may be hope.

Quote:The cynical lie that ''fat is fabulous'' and why plus size bloggers should never be considered role models for young women

Singer and Loose Women panellist Jamelia has been ''hounded'' for simply speaking the truth: that being grossly overweight is unhealthy and society should never endorse it as a life choice

By Dr Sarah Burnett 7:05AM BST 23 Apr 2015

Being morbidly obese is a choice. There, I’ve said it. I know it won’t make me popular, that many will accuse me of ‘‘fat-shaming’’, while others will argue that being grossly overweight is a disability, and who chooses to be disabled?
But to be honest I am still reeling in shock from having seen Plus Sized Wars on Channel 4 this week. I watched the documentary with a mounting sense of horror, as the so-called Plus Size Bloggers - young, obese women who flaunt their excess weight on Instagram and Twitter and have thousands of online followers - together with a host of fashionistas, retailers and shoppers lined up to insist that “fat is fabulous”.

But here is just one less than fabulous consequence of the obesity epidemic in this country that I encounter daily in my work as a doctor. I’m a radiologist and some of the men and women who come to see me (in the new, extra large wheelchairs the NHS now has to purchase) are so large that they can’t fit in a standard MRI scanner so we can't diagnose what is going on underneath all those layers of fat. There are open-sided scanners we can use instead but the images they produce are of a much poorer quality.

Far from fat being fabulous, it is a public health time bomb. Forget the problems that the health system faces face with an ageing population - a recurring theme in this election campaign. Statistics show that 60 per cent of teenage girls in this country are overweight, and 20 per cent of young mothers are obese. Britain is home to the fattest women in Western Europe and our menfolk are fifth in the league table, according to a 2011 study published in The Lancet. I can’t believe that things have improved.

The harsh truth is these people are simply not going to reach old age. Complications associated with their obesity will get them first – after having cost the rest of us a fortune along the way in treating them just because they eat too much, and no-one seems prepared to tell them. To tell them that they need to stop, that it will be hard but they can - with help - do something about it. Efforts to ‘‘normalise’’ gargantuan appetites and bodies, as high street retailers are so cynically doing with aggressive marketing of high fashion plus sizes promoted by beautiful, but morbidly obese models, is utterly wrong.

Perhaps we need to define our terms here. I am not talking about those women who are size 14 or 16. I am all for initiatives, such as the Dove campaign for Real Beauty, that celebrate real women rather than air-brushed stick insects. For the record, as a 52-year-old mother of two, I am a size 14 and I could probably do with losing a few pounds for health reasons rather than vanity.

Interestingly, not one of the talking heads from the fashion industry, PR companies and, with a few exceptions, the model agencies who featured in the Channel 4 documentary was very overweight. Here was a buch of folk who would never want to be fat themselves seeking to make money out of those who are by lying to them they looked great. It was akin to fat pornography for them. (And, by the way, that exploitation extended to the broadcaster interspersing the documentary with pizza commercials. That was downright irresponsible.)

I don’t have a heart of stone, so I can’t to be too critical of the morbidly obese young women in their late teens and early twenties who appeared. Like many other viewers, I suspect, I could see the pain that lay just below their brittle exteriors as they assured the interviewer that they were happy and at ease with being a size 24, and how inspired they were by the likes of American super (plus-sized) model, Tess Munster, 29, who at 5ft 4in is a size 18/20 (and possibly then some). They are deluding themselves and it is desperately sad. What I do know is that if any of these girls were my daughter, I would be telling them the truth about what lies ahead.

Some of the contributors had undeniably had pretty faces, great skin and hair and they dressed with style and panache. At the moment, they have youth on their side, but I will not be surprised if, by the age of 40, some of them are using mobility scooters. Indeed, some of them already appeared to be having problems with their knees as they struggled to stand up without support.

In terms of life expectancy, the morbidly obese face a similar scenario to the lifelong smoker. Research shows that could cost them at least 10 years of life. With those youngsters already morbidly obese in their teens, I’d say 20 years would be more realistic.

And what will happen in the intervening years? Well, to start at the lower end of the scale, there will be the annoying niggles – backache and joint issues, chaffing etc, from carrying all that extra flesh. They will be especially prone to being knock-kneed, as the joint space is eroded by the weight bearing down on it.
I see plenty of women who come for scans because they have lower limb problems that I know would be eased if they weren’t so overweight, but no-one seems willing to confront them with that simple remedy. Instead, we treat the limb problems, and often end up listing the women as medically disabled.

Another issue obese young women may face is impaired fertility, as their size impacts their hormones and periods become irregular. And let’s be brutally frank – their partners may not be quite so willing to have sex with them. Being morbidly obese causes personal hygiene problems. I don’t call that fabulous.

If these women then need infertility treatment, they will find most consultants demand that the first thing they do is lose weight. Even if they can get past this obstacle, morbidly obese mothers have higher than usual levels of foetal deaths and of complications when giving birth, not to mention the damage their over-eating does to their unborn child’s metabolism.

As the years pass, they will face a much higher risk than the general population of diabetes, cardiovascular problems, strokes and heart attacks. There are also strong links with being morbidly obese and breast and endometrial cancer.

I am sorry if this litany of pain and suffering sounds extreme, but someone has to say it. Someone needs to tell these young women, bedazzled by the bloggers, big models and the high fashion advertisements, that they are killing themselves. If we allowed our pets to over-eat to this extent, the RSPCA would remove them from our homes.

I am well aware that by speaking out I will face a backlash. When the singer Jamelia, a panellist on ITV’s Loose Women, suggested this week, in the wake of the documentary, that shops shouldn’t stock clothes for obese women (or, for that matter “size zeros”) because they need to “feel uncomfortable” about their unhealthy size, she was hounded online and forced to apologise.

How wrong-headed is that? She was simply and correctly challenging those who are set – out of conviction or in order to make a profit – on enabling youngsters to make choices that ultimately, despite all the fat-is-fabulous rhetoric, will be disastrous for them.

The young women featured in the documentary may be in utter denial now, but what they are doing to themselves will overshadow their lives. And the rest of us, who fund the NHS.

"Men willingly believe what they wish." - Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico, Book III, Ch. 18
04-23-2015 03:36 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 2 users Like TheWastelander's post:
Saweeep, EDantes
godfather dust Away
Ostrich
****
Gold Member

Posts: 2,469
Joined: Jul 2014
Reputation: 18
Post: #52
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Ban mobility chairs. Then allow them to lay there until they die or starve off enough weight to walk.
04-23-2015 05:55 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
CH-Toronto Offline
Kingfisher
***

Posts: 718
Joined: Feb 2015
Reputation: 15
Post: #53
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(04-23-2015 03:36 PM)TheWastelander Wrote:  Interestingly, not one of the talking heads from the fashion industry, PR companies and, with a few exceptions, the model agencies who featured in the Channel 4 documentary was very overweight. Here was a buch of folk who would never want to be fat themselves seeking to make money out of those who are by lying to them they looked great. It was akin to fat pornography for them. (And, by the way, that exploitation extended to the broadcaster interspersing the documentary with pizza commercials. That was downright irresponsible.)

This is pretty much what it comes down to. If there's a way to make money off of it, people will find it.
04-24-2015 04:29 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes CH-Toronto's post:
Saweeep
heavy Offline
Hummingbird
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 2,786
Joined: Sep 2013
Reputation: 36
Post: #54
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
It's good to see a fat woman being logical about the subject...well, most of the article.

Note: The last few paragraphs and some of the language throughout are tough to read, but I still found the article refreshing. Even with the last part, she at least flies in the face of the PC and SJW crowd. She takes a heavy stance against the idea that offended = crime committed.

Picture not posted because...well she's a really fat woman. Google her at your own risk: Hilary Holland Lorenzo

The 'Fat and Fabulous' Farce

Quote:There are terms tossed about in the media recently: "fat acceptance," "fat and fabulous," "fat-shaming." I am a woman of size. Fat. I don't follow up that word with a sparkly adjective because it isn't warranted. Why? Firstly, "fat" is a word offensive only to the people who decide it is offensive, which I don't. I find it merely descriptive. Secondly, "fat shaming" is a recent social construct/concept to which I don't subscribe.

Shame only works on a willing recipient.

I don't need anyone's approval to be who I am and look the way I look. No one does. I'm not being snarky by saying that-- we just don't need it, though it is nice to have. In its absence, I don't personally walk about bemoaning my body mass index, nor how I am received because of it, nor am I heralding my size as a moving part of my proposed fabulosity. I have other things on my mind. At least, I do until I am reminded by a fellow plus-sizer that I should redirect my attention to making society more tolerable of my fat.

If there are opportunities in life that I have missed based on some nefarious, behind-the-scenes fat bias, I am happy to miss them. There are plenty of others in spaces and places where I'd likely better belong if my dress size counts me out.

The spotlight is often placed on the same people of size who inadvertently helped plug the spotlight in. They spend as much time taking a stand for "fat acceptance" as their healthier counterparts do in the gym. The subject continues to abound with every support group, blog, article and reality show lauding "fat and fabulousness"; magazines with near-naked women flaunting their curves as a big "F-YOU" to their purported haters. Those women are all beautiful, but isn't the energy wasted? Who is the target audience? Why does anyone care?

Here's where I am really going to tell you the truth. Someone on the team has to.

There are some average-weighters who have concerns that may be worth a listen. A lady in coach may find the duration of a flight challenging when my thigh spread creeps over to her side of the seating. A fellow employee may be concerned when your fifth trip to the cardiologist drives his healthcare premiums up. These seem like valid concerns. Plus-sized folks are conditioned to avoid these topics, and any conversation related to their own wellness.

Not everyone who is fat suffers from diabetes, heart and blood pressure problems. I don't. But I will without a change. A high BMI indisputably causes medical melee on a body. In spite of what we hear repeatedly by naysayers, if you are obese, you are not healthy.

Another zinger: Most of us in the fat-body club are here because we choose to be here. We don't make good food choices; we don't move our bodies the way we could. The majority of us make excuses to the tune of: "I have tried every diet... They don't work!" and "I have a thyroid problem." Some have issues that cause weight gain, for sure. Disabilities and medications can significantly cause the pounds to quickly pile on, like prescribed corticosteroids and antidepressants. Even then, though, weight gain can be effectively managed with life adjustments. The majority of us don't suffer from those, if we are being honest, or didn't, until our bodies buckled under the proverbial weight.

A person who educates himself in the science of nutrition, who eats whole (unprocessed, unrefined) foods consistently and proportionately, with regular cardio/fat-burning exercise, is not likely going to be or remain fat. It is conceptually that simple. I know all of this. I know what I'm supposed to be doing. I am not currently doing it. I chose this for now, so this is where I am.

I recently watched a girl on a new reality show (based on her size) exuberantly espouse her love for her "fat and fabulous" body and its position in her life. Two scenes and 10 minutes later, she was sobbing, suffering because of her weight in dating, fashion, strangers' comments, and her parents' wishes for her to become healthy. Funny, isn't it, how we can turn genuine concern and love into "you don't accept me"? They do accept us, so much that they want to keep us alive longer, not bawling in front of a T.V. camera on a show centered on the least interesting part of ourselves like that girl who spends her life trying to persuade everyone that she is fat and fabulous. She's the one who seems to need to believe it, not everyone else.

She is not fabulous because she is fat. Neither am I. Neither are you.

You are fabulous because you're an amazing mother or friend. You're the guy who made someone giggle, or who shared his last dollar. You're fabulous for being that third grade teacher a student will remember as the most impactful when she is 35, who may even try to visit you in your retirement home years. You're fabulous because you're silly and fun, or reflective and wise. You're fabulous because you rocked those 5" sequined stripper heels on a night out with the girls. You're fabulous because you're 50, but your spirit is 19.

If you're not a total schmuck, you're fabulous because you're you. You have elements that truly embody (no pun intended) your unique spirit.

"Fat-shaming" is a media trend on an annoying upswing, fueled by fat people who keep it alive like a stoked fire. This is not a crusade in which we should want to be included. We're losing the points we're trying to nail down under the guise of self-love and acceptance. The world can't give that to us. We take that for our ourselves. When we do, the right ones will follow along.

THAT'S what's fabulous.

“Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”
09-28-2015 04:28 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Cr33pin Offline
Peacock
******
Gold Member

Posts: 7,769
Joined: Nov 2011
Reputation: 185
Post: #55
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Once the Trump gets into office in 2016 he will cure the fatty epidemic as soon as hes done with his wall... He's going to make America great again!

Bruising cervix since 96
#TeamBeard
09-28-2015 04:38 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Cr33pin's post:
Caribou
PolymathGuru Offline
Kingfisher
***

Posts: 758
Joined: Jul 2015
Reputation: 15
Post: #56
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Yes, it will. Once the fat out die the skinny, the statistics will show the population as not as obese as before.

A Guide to Exploring and Relocating within the United States.

A Guide for Creating a Burner Laptop and installing TAILS OS for RVF and ROK security and anonymity

The four Multipliers of wealth and Income
09-28-2015 04:50 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Captainstabbin Offline
Hummingbird
*****

Posts: 3,670
Joined: Apr 2015
Reputation: 23
Post: #57
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
There will be a safer version of DNP available at some point.
09-28-2015 05:32 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Captain Gh Offline
Ostrich
****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,948
Joined: Feb 2013
Reputation: 16
Post: #58
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Ah the famous DNP! I think that it's just too raw to ever be safe! I'm actually glad that it's not so easily available on the market because the bodies would be pilling up on that stuff if it was mainstream. All these dummies would be cooking themselves to death on it... just for the love of carbs! Just too dangerous
09-28-2015 07:06 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Captain Gh's post:
Captainstabbin
262 Offline
Banned

Posts: 1,778
Joined: Dec 2014
Post: #59
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Some new data. Looks bad:

"Prevalence of obesity in U.S. increases among women, but not men" - https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...113250.htm

Quote:Date: June 7, 2016
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Summary: The prevalence of obesity in 2013- 2014 was 35 percent among men and 40 percent among women, and between 2005 and 2014, there was an increase in prevalence among women, but not men, according to an American study.

Full Article:
Quote:Between 1980 and 2000, the prevalence of obesity increased significantly among adult men and women in the United States; further significant increases were observed through 2003-2004 for men but not women. Subsequent comparisons of data from 2003-2004 with data through 2011-2012 showed no significant increases for men or women. To get a more comprehensive understanding of the trends in obesity, Katherine M. Flegal, Ph.D., of the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues examined obesity prevalence for 2013-2014 and trends over the decade from 2005 through 2014, adjusting for sex, age, race/Hispanic origin, smoking status, and education. The researchers analyzed data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a cross-sectional, nationally representative health examination survey of the U.S. civilian population that includes measured weight and height.

The analysis included data from 2,638 adult men (average age, 47 years) and 2,817 women (average age, 48 years) from the most recent 2 years (2013-2014) of NHANES and data from 21,013 participants in previous NHANES surveys from 2005 through 2012. For the years 2013-2014, the overall age-adjusted prevalence of obesity (body mass index [BMI] 30 or greater) was 38 percent; among men, it was 35 percent; and among women, it was 40 percent. The corresponding prevalence of class 3 (BMI 40 or greater) obesity overall was 7.7 percent; among men, it was 5.5 percent; and among women, it was 9.9 percent. Analyses of changes over the decade from 2005 through 2014, adjusted for age, race/Hispanic origin, smoking status, and education, showed significant increasing linear trends among women for overall obesity and for class 3 obesity but not among men.

Analyses of the data from 2013-2014 found that for men, obesity prevalence varied by smoking status, with the prevalence of obesity significantly lower among current smokers than among never smokers. For women, there were no significant differences by smoking status, but those with education beyond high school were significantly less likely to be obese.

The authors write that although there has been considerable speculation about the causes of the increases in obesity prevalence, data are lacking to show the causes of these trends, and there are few data to indicate reasons that these trends might accelerate, stop, or slow. "Other studies are needed to determine the reasons for these trends."

Editorial: The Unrelenting Challenge of Obesity

"What is the next step in addressing the epidemic of obesity?" write Jody W. Zylke, M.D., Deputy Editor, JAMA, and Howard Bauchner, M.D., Editor in Chief, JAMA, in an editorial commenting on the two studies in this issue of JAMA examining trends of obesity in the U.S.

"Much research and attention have been directed toward treatment of obesity, but the development of new drugs and procedures will not solve the problem. Perhaps genetics will unlock some of the mysteries of obesity, but this will take time, and more immediate solutions are needed. The emphasis has to be on prevention, despite evidence that school- and community-based prevention programs and education campaigns by local governments and professional societies have not been highly successful."

"The obesity epidemic in the United States is now 3 decades old, and huge investments have been made in research, clinical care, and development of various programs to counteract obesity. However, few data suggest the epidemic is diminishing. Perhaps it is time for an entirely different approach, one that emphasizes collaboration with the food and restaurant industries that are in part responsible for putting food on dinner tables."
06-07-2016 04:50 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Teutatis Offline
Pelican
****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,363
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 17
Post: #60
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
And those are only the obese ones, if you add the overweight and the fat that number shoots up. I can't count how many women I've known who are fat and out of shape but because they're not obese think they're great. And if we think about how any remotely attractive woman in the west is most likely a prostitute, porn actress, sugar baby, cam whore, etc., because there are so few and therefore the demand for them is huge, thus making themselves leave the dating pool is it any wonder why so many guys resort to porn? There simply aren't enough normal women to go around, the only ones available are the swamp monsters, fuglies and over the hill wall victims.
And yet we still have these fat feminist fucks crying about anorexia as if that's what's affecting society, as if the minute number of women affected by it has any significance in the general population. Fuck, this is depressing.
06-07-2016 06:47 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Teutatis's post:
Latan
HankMoody Offline
Banned

Posts: 1,331
Joined: Aug 2015
Post: #61
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
This is the issue...

People used to eat a lot less. Not because they were inherently less gluttoness, but because food was much more expensive and much less available. My grandmother grew up in the depression, and would tell stories about how food was sometimes rationed off. Food was also much more plain and natural - fruits, vegetables, and meat.

In the 1950s, the government created a policy of subsidizing corn. Meaning that farmers get paid for the amount of corn they grow, rather than its market value. The more corn, the more food, and the cheaper it gets. Suddenly everyone was able to be fed.

At some point, scientists developed high fructose corn syrup and corn starch. This allowed them to turn corn into everything under the sun - bread, poptarts, chocolate, soda, "iced tea", muffins, you name it. And for a very cheap price. Around the same time, developers started to experiment with oils which were also corn based ("vegetable oil). This lead to a much more carbohydrate based diet, because it was available.

Interestingly, the rate of heart disease and heart attacks started to go up. In response, the government commissioned the Ancel Keys study. Without much evidence, Keys determined that the cause of heart disease was saturated fat and cholesterol. Even though countries around the world who eat the most saturated fat have the lowest rate of heart problems. How convenient - the solution to the problem was more corn.

As a result, the populous as a whole moved to "healthy" carbohydrate, corn based processed food diets. Bagel for breakfast, muffin for a snack, sandwich with low fat chicken for lunch (topped with non-fat mayo), and then turkey hamburgers (or better yet, a processed veggie burger) for dinner. We moved away from making things with pure lard and instead using "healthy" vegetable oil. (See, e.g., McDonalds). America became confused about what "health food" is. It just so happens that selling these foods is very lucrative.

At the same time, we were also able to create factory farming due to corn subsidies. With food so available, it became possible to create farms where thousands of animals, fed corn diets, are able to be fed like crazy, fattened up, and sent to slaughter. Baconators are now available at any time of the day. Where once a relatively rare commodity, processed cheese can now be found on everything. Combining saturated fat with something high carbohydrate is the worst thing a person can eat, because it both spikes your insulin and contains a significant amount of calories.

Agribusiness has grown like crazy due to government subsidies. Today, go into any gas station and you'll find processed beef jerky, twinkies, donuts, tacitos, and other corn based snacks. Even cheap beers like Miller Lite and Budweiser are made from corn. And note that most soda doesn't even have sugar in it, but rather high fructose corn syrup. In my grandmother's day, a soda or a piece of chocolate was a special treat. Now you can get a big gulp 24 hours a day.

The reality is that our bodies thrive on higher fat, non-processed food. Moreover, contrary to the Keys study, cholesterol is essential for men to keep their testosterone levels high. Grass fed steak, whole eggs, sardines, avocado, salmon, coconut, and even lard. However, these foods are a challenge to cook, more expensive, and they don't taste as good. They're not nearly as profitable to produce, and they are not as available as a poptart. You can't find them in gas stations. Plus, people believe they are unhealthy due to "all the fat." Most people believe that a low fat muffin with margarine is better for you than a grass fed steak. America is still completely confused about what constitutes a "health food."

This is the biggest problem - carbohydrates spike your insulin. When your insulin gets spiked, it makes you hungrier, stores what you've eaten as fat, and depletes your energy. Meaning your body is sending you signals that it's starving as you're getting fatter. After you've eaten a low fat muffin, two hours later you're starving and craving a bagel. In contrast, a high fat, low carb diet lowers your insulin and makes you less hungry.

Making this worse, recently we've been fed garbage that a person needs to eat 6 meals a day to "keep the fuel burning", and that skipping meals slows your metabolism. Breakfast is the most important part of the day. That's baloney! However, people are using this information to snack at every juncture. People on a high carb diet think their metabolism is burning, but in reality their insulin is simply spiked. People on a low carb diet have no problem skipping meals because their insulin in check. And the reality is that losing weight is a simple equation of calories in vs. calories out. The more calories you eat in a day, the more fat you're going to store.

So, to answer your question, the obesity crisis is a matter of failed public policy, misinformation, and capitalism gone crazy due to government subsidies. It's not a matter of people just waking up and stop being lazy. To fix it, our government has to stop subsidizing corn so heavily, and instead try to move back to a food economy that supports natural food. Even if it means less food will be available, and that companies like Kraft, Nestle, Coca-Cola, and other major producers will take a hit.
(This post was last modified: 06-07-2016 07:18 PM by HankMoody.)
06-07-2016 06:56 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 5 users Like HankMoody's post:
WestIndianArchie, Brodiaga, Gimlet, getdownonit, DJ-Matt
Teutatis Offline
Pelican
****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,363
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 17
Post: #62
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
I agree with you, but I'd like to point out that even though healthy fats are great, and I eat a lot of it myself, carbs are not the devil either, carbs are great too and extremely needed by our bodies, but by carbs I mean potatoes, sweet potatoes, oats, rice, fruits, vegetables, not twinkies, cookies, cake, bagels, chips and other processed crap.
06-07-2016 07:08 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
nek Offline
Pelican
****

Posts: 1,323
Joined: Nov 2012
Reputation: 16
Post: #63
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
In a consumer economy, cheap food means freeing up people's money to spend on things they "want" vs. what they need. People are much more thrifty when it comes to buying things they need, things they want, they're much more liberal with their money. It's like in college, dudes wouldn't spend shit on textbooks and would just try to borrow them from the library (even though someone else always had borrowed it for the semester), but they always managed to scrounge money together to go to $1 bomb nights (and blow the cost of a textbook in 3 hrs).

Civilize the mind but make savage the body.
06-07-2016 07:32 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Merenguero Offline
Crow
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 4,369
Joined: Jul 2012
Reputation: 71
Post: #64
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 06:56 PM)HankMoody Wrote:  Breakfast is the most important part of the day. That's baloney!

If you eat breakfast, especially without doing any exercise beforehand, which is the case with most people, you are starting off the day dumping tons of calories into your body. It makes absolutely no sense. Add to that the fact that most breakfast foods are sugary garbage like sugary cereals and pancakes and you are probably doing yourself a disservice by eating breakfast.
06-07-2016 07:39 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 3 users Like Merenguero's post:
philosophical_recovery, HankMoody, bootyhuntah
Teutatis Offline
Pelican
****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,363
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 17
Post: #65
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Completely disagree, depending on when you had your last meal the night before you have been fasting for about 7 to 10 hours when you wake up, you definitely need to dump calories into your body, eating breakfast is not a disservice at all.
(This post was last modified: 06-07-2016 07:54 PM by Teutatis.)
06-07-2016 07:53 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Merenguero Offline
Crow
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 4,369
Joined: Jul 2012
Reputation: 71
Post: #66
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 07:53 PM)Teutatis Wrote:  Completely disagree, depending on when you had your last meal the night before you have been fasting for about 7 to 10 hours when you wake up, you definitely need to dump calories into your body, eating breakfast is not a disservice at all.

Find fifty people who eat breakfast every day and fifty people who never eat breakfast, then tell me who is in better shape/more fat.
06-07-2016 07:56 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Surreyman Offline
Kingfisher
***
Gold Member

Posts: 902
Joined: Apr 2012
Reputation: 13
Post: #67
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 07:39 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  
(06-07-2016 06:56 PM)HankMoody Wrote:  Breakfast is the most important part of the day. That's baloney!

If you eat breakfast, especially without doing any exercise beforehand, which is the case with most people, you are starting off the day dumping tons of calories into your body. It makes absolutely no sense. Add to that the fact that most breakfast foods are sugary garbage like sugary cereals and pancakes and you are probably doing yourself a disservice by eating breakfast.

Surely men doing physical labour need breakfast?
06-07-2016 08:00 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Surreyman Offline
Kingfisher
***
Gold Member

Posts: 902
Joined: Apr 2012
Reputation: 13
Post: #68
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 07:56 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  
(06-07-2016 07:53 PM)Teutatis Wrote:  Completely disagree, depending on when you had your last meal the night before you have been fasting for about 7 to 10 hours when you wake up, you definitely need to dump calories into your body, eating breakfast is not a disservice at all.

Find fifty people who eat breakfast every day and fifty people who never eat breakfast, then tell me who is in better shape/more fat.

There's a question of causation. Breakfast eaters are on average more disciplined/organised.

Non-breakfast eaters of RVF are likely just as organised and disciplined as others, this is not an average community.
06-07-2016 08:02 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Teutatis Offline
Pelican
****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,363
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 17
Post: #69
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 07:56 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  
(06-07-2016 07:53 PM)Teutatis Wrote:  Completely disagree, depending on when you had your last meal the night before you have been fasting for about 7 to 10 hours when you wake up, you definitely need to dump calories into your body, eating breakfast is not a disservice at all.

Find fifty people who eat breakfast every day and fifty people who never eat breakfast, then tell me who is in better shape/more fat.

I can bet anything you want that the people who eat breakfast tend to be in better shape.
(This post was last modified: 06-07-2016 08:06 PM by Teutatis.)
06-07-2016 08:05 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Merenguero Offline
Crow
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 4,369
Joined: Jul 2012
Reputation: 71
Post: #70
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 08:05 PM)Teutatis Wrote:  
(06-07-2016 07:56 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  
(06-07-2016 07:53 PM)Teutatis Wrote:  Completely disagree, depending on when you had your last meal the night before you have been fasting for about 7 to 10 hours when you wake up, you definitely need to dump calories into your body, eating breakfast is not a disservice at all.

Find fifty people who eat breakfast every day and fifty people who never eat breakfast, then tell me who is in better shape/more fat.

I can bet anything you want that the people who eat breakfast tend to be in better shape.

Would those people be eating sugary cereals like Coco Puffs and garbage like pancakes and waffles or do those products just go unsold?
06-07-2016 08:14 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
ivansirko Offline
Pelican
****

Posts: 1,022
Joined: Apr 2016
Reputation: 3
Post: #71
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 08:14 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  Would those people be eating sugary cereals like Coco Puffs and garbage like pancakes and waffles or do those products just go unsold?

Is that all anyone who admits to eating breakfast eats?

Chances are talking to any man on the street if they were to admit to eating breakfast you could probably tell what kind of breakfast they eat just by looking at them. Most likely no one would admit to eating 2 bowls of Frosted Flakes a day. Also that kind of crap for the most part is for kids.
06-07-2016 08:19 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Merenguero Offline
Crow
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 4,369
Joined: Jul 2012
Reputation: 71
Post: #72
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 08:19 PM)ivansirko Wrote:  
(06-07-2016 08:14 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  Would those people be eating sugary cereals like Coco Puffs and garbage like pancakes and waffles or do those products just go unsold?

Is that all anyone who admits to eating breakfast eats?

Chances are talking to any man on the street if they were to admit to eating breakfast you could probably tell what kind of breakfast they eat just by looking at them. Most likely no one would admit to eating 2 bowls of Frosted Flakes a day. Also that kind of crap for the most part is for kids.

They might not admit to eating all kinds of garbage, but that stuff gets sold and tons and tons of people eat breakfast. Even with eating healthy food for breakfast, you are starting the day off putting in calories that you need to burn. The people who skip breakfast come out ahead in that sense as they start the day with zero calories. I agree that many breakfast foods can give you protein and much needed vitamins and minerals. The solution there is to get protein from a meal later in the day. I like steak, chicken, and salmon, and to take vitamins and other supplements at the time when all those other people are eating garbage breakfast foods and even healthy breakfast foods. I start every day off with zinc, basically every letter vitamin, and more minerals than I can even list or keep track of.
(This post was last modified: 06-07-2016 08:35 PM by Merenguero.)
06-07-2016 08:25 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Merenguero's post:
HankMoody
HankMoody Offline
Banned

Posts: 1,331
Joined: Aug 2015
Post: #73
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
This is what works for me. Your milage may vary...

I wake up around 6:30 - 7, drink a cup of black coffee, and take zinc, a multi-vitamin, and ZMA. I usually get to the office around 9, on my bike, assuming I'm not in court. During the day I drink water infused with lemon, lime, cucumber, and apple cider vinegar. I also drink a shitload of coffee flavored with cinnamon. Sometimes I'll drink yerba mate tea instead of coffee. I have a standing desk so that I'm not just sitting around all day.

Typically I eat my first meal around 3pm at the office (avocado, sardines, little bit of Greek yogurt, and a tablespoon of fish oil). These are foods that are easy to store in the office, they're light, and don't require any cooking. My pantry is filled with nothing but sardines, and avocados keep really well.

I go to the gym around 4pm for heavy lifting, and then do kickboxing or BJJ around 6. If I'm pressed for time, P90x is great. My basement is setup as a gym.

After, I eat something like steak and eggs (cooked in lard or Kerrygold butter), washed down with cold green tea and another tablespoon of fish oil. Maybe raw or cooked coconut if I'm still hungry. I might also have a cup of coffee with coconut oil or butter, bulletproof style.

If I'm not doing anything active due to court obligations, I might do a 24 or 48 hour fast, especially if I'm feeling fat. Intermittent fasting and heavy caloric restriction knocks the weight right off, provided your body is able to do it. (your insulin levels need to be squared away).

I spend the rest of my evenings drafting motions, replying to emails, posting on the RVF, etc.

Again, this just fits my lifestyle and keeps everything simple. If I were a construction worker I might eat breakfast.
(This post was last modified: 06-07-2016 08:36 PM by HankMoody.)
06-07-2016 08:35 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
EDantes Offline
Pelican
****
Silver Member

Posts: 1,355
Joined: Jan 2016
Reputation: 9
Post: #74
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
Well if 90% of the population becomes Obese and there's ever a major World War with China or Russia it may very well guarantee defeat by our enemy.

If we can't even move our ass cheeks off the couch there's no way we'll be able to fight and defend ourselves.

Here's hoping though that the trend of advocating "acceptance" of dysfunctional behaviors such as obesity and gender confusion dies off since it's really no different than when tobacco companies used to promote cigarettes as a "health or weight loss product".
06-07-2016 08:37 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
ivansirko Offline
Pelican
****

Posts: 1,022
Joined: Apr 2016
Reputation: 3
Post: #75
RE: Is there any chance the obesity epidemic will reverse in our lifetimes?
(06-07-2016 08:25 PM)Merenguero Wrote:  They might not admit to eating all kinds of garbage, but that stuff gets sold and tons and tons of people eat breakfast. Even with eating healthy food for breakfast, you are starting the day off putting in calories that you need to burn.

You are absolutely right. I just dont believe eating breakfast in general is a problem.
06-07-2016 08:41 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes ivansirko's post:
Merenguero
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | RooshV.com | Return to Top | Return to Content | Mobile Version | RSS Syndication