I'm Touring The United States! Starting in June, I'm conducting private events in 23 American cities. Click here for full details.

Post Reply 
The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Author Message
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #1
The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
I've been wanting to collate the little bits of knowledge that I've accumulated in the past few years or so of trying to gain strength. I've been working out quasi-regularly since almost 20 years ago, but I couldn't get my diet to work at the time and I never got anywhere past barely being able to lift my bodyweight on the bar.

There are several consistent things that I've noticed help me reduce the amount of injuries I get, which can range from a pulled muscle to torn soft tissue or fracture:

Footwear

My issues with footwear started when I put in shoe inserts for running long distance. I thought the aches and pains I had were due to a "collapsed arch" or a low arch that one of my general practitioners mentioned as a kid, and I thought from then on that something was wrong with my foot. So, I always wore these terrible running shoes with inserts when I ran track.

This screwed my entire leg geometry up. I ended up with severe knee and hip pain. I thought I had somehow broken something, even though I never fell or got hit there. I got MRIs performed, and all the doctors said was that there was some "inflammation" at my hip and knee, where my IT band rubs against the bones. I was scared of running since then.

I then broke my leg in an accident and was afraid of not being able to run at all if I never tried again.

When I got interested in serious fitness years later, I got caught up in the Vibram FiveFingers fad and bought a couple of pairs. I had done some research and I found out how modern running shoes changed your foot geometry greatly. I immediately began to question my use of running shoes and inserts that resulted in my IT band pain and fear of running. So, I tried everything from barefoot to Vibram and flat soled shoes. Even after having broken my leg, I was able to rehab my foot and leg strength to where I could run greater distances on rougher terrain than I ever could when I injured my IT band.

However, this goes out the window when I wear modern shoes with heels. I highly recommend staying away from anything that lifts your heels, especially when running or weightlifting. I no longer run unless it's a random 5k without training or I just want to run on a lark, but I always do it in shoes that are very lightweight with a flat sole that promotes a mid-sole impact instead of toes or heels.

For weightlifting, I have done some similar research, and always lift with either no shoes on or with flat shoes. I've already had enough bad form issues to deal with, without having the additional complication of unnatural foot geometry causing additional knee and hip issues.

Weight Progression and Form

It happens to me and many others when progressing to heavier and heavier weights. We try to eke out that last rep, because how else are we going to progress? With perfect form maintained, I don't see as huge of a risk, but how often are we pulling that last movement with perfect form?

Any time your form changes, STOP and drop the weight.

This is most true on squats, deadlifts, bench press, overhead press, and other compound movements with high potential for injury. I've gnashed my teeth over going from a 300 pound lift to a 250 pound lift and all of the progress I'm not going to be making, but usually, by backing off, I can make a minor form tweak and end up lifting higher than I started, with better form, less pain, and less soreness. This deloading phase is extremely important for improvement. I ignored it for 2 years and couldn't get my bench or squat to improve much because of it.

What I do when injured
Increase Vitamin D intake by getting sun or tanning
Your body needs vitamin D to heal. It may be a placebo effect with tanning, but I think that getting natural sunlight is better than popping pills (which should only be the gels, not the powder shit)

Go low carb and high fat
When I broke my leg, I was scared shitless about getting fat, as I had always been skinny and was starting to get a belly. I went extremely strict on low carbs and got out of the injury without putting on fat.

If you can, do physical activities on the same schedule that you had before
The biggest issue with any injury is pyschological and emotional, not physical. Your body is made to heal. If you break good habits by being scared of them, however, you will weaken yourself such that you become a walking self-fulfilling prophecy of no gains.

Why I am personally scared of squats and deadlifts but do them anyway
To start, for more information on the deadlift, see StrikeBack's excellent thread.

I grew up skinny kid afraid of girls, my own shadow, large cats, masculinity, and my own voice. It made sense to be afraid of turning my spine into a pretzel when I first tried lifting weights almost two decades ago. However, I've never hurt my back, because I've always been afraid enough to have good form and not go heavy enough to get out of shape.

Even after incorporating squats and deads back into a regular routine a few years ago, I occasionally run into someone who's injured themselves doing either. One in particular used to be heavy into weightlifting, until he told me that he dropped form and slipped a disk. He likes to tell me stories about how awesome he was back in the day, and show me pictures (he had a really good physique, better than mine now), but he will never deadlift or even lift weights again.

Pyschologically, he has accepted his fat, blubbery fate of never working out again.

He has refused the surgery, he has given up on non-surgical treatments, and has put on a significant amount of weight, to the point that he is mostly invisible to women and actively acknowledges this, as well as his fatness and his male hamster lack of desire for women, which I armchair diagnose as age exacerbated by low testosterone.

I never want to be that guy. And, thus, I did some research. Specifically, spinal disc herniations, the idea of which freaks me out and makes me never want to squat and deadlift again. That is, until I found out what I did:

The Professional Athlete Spine Initiative: outcomes after lumbar disc herniation in 342 elite professional athletes.


Now, if you're reading this, you're likely not considered to be an athlete. I am not either. However, there is surgery and treatment with a high likelihood of success for this kind of injury!

From another article:
Quote: The Spine Journal (March 2011) reported that 81% of the athletes returned to their sport for an average of 3.3 years post surgery. This study also stated that there was no difference in return to play rates between those having surgery versus those who chose to have their disc herniation treated conservatively.
Clinical Orthopedics (July 2014) performed a review of all related studies on lumbar discectomy in elite athletes noting that at least 75% of the athletes returned to play reaching a performance level of at least 64% of pre-surgical capacity.
A study of professional hockey players (Am J. Sports Med, 2013) looked at 87 players suffering lumbar disc herniation noting no difference in return to play between those treated surgically versus conservatively. Perhaps more important, however, is that they found a significant decrease in performance, after return to play, in all athletes suffering this injury.
20 out 29 baseball players with lumbar disc herniation were treated with surgery. All of these returned to play as did the 9 being treated conservatively. (Orthodedics 2011)
Professional basketball was also studied finding that 75% of those having lumbar discectomy returned to play with a small decrease in performance (Spine, 2010)

And another:
Quote:Until this year, very little data were available that healthcare practitioners and athletes could use to help guide the decision-making process when faced with a cervical or lumbar disk herniation. The data in this study suggest that because NFL players can return to play at a high rate and sustain long, productive careers even after surgical treatment such as a single-level anterior diskectomy and fusion, elite athletes should not necessarily be afraid to undergo this procedure, should it be recommended. Although it appears that defensive backs of American football have poorer outcomes after a cervical disk herniation than other positions, other surgical procedures may be better suited for this type of athlete, such as a posterior foraminotomy. Our current prospective research initiative may answer questions such as these for elite athletes across several sports who may be predisposed to such cervical disk injuries.

NFL players are literally having parts of their spines fused together and are returning to play after this injury.

This is satisfying to me. It may not be to you. I don't want to have a spinal injury from squats and deadlifts, so I'm conservative with my progress if my form drops. However, this knowledge that someone performing at that level, with proper rehab, can return to play an impact intense sport is comforting in my mind.

The choice remains to you. Educate yourself. But, I'm planning on squatting and deadlifting until I physically cannot, and then rehabilitating myself after major injuries and surgeries if I need to. There are instances of powerlifters doing it. Although I don't have powerlifting as a goal, I now know it's not an injury that necessarily will keep me from doing these exercises. So, are these exercises really that bad? I'm worried more about wrapping it up in a car or motorcycle accident than this activity. These activities may strengthen my bones and spinal support muscles enough to prevent some of those injuries anyway. I don't see a downside of having stronger, better-coordinated muscles when shit does hit the fan in a way I cannot predict.

Specific injury summary: What I have Recovered From and what I did

Severe IT band pain from running
See above for detail, but barefoot strengthening and switching to flat shoes stopped this pain

Knee and Hip pain from squatting
I believe, but I cannot prove it, that this is related to my previous IT band problems due to it happening on the same side.

It started when I first reached around my bodyweight in squats. I couldn't get all the way to 225 pounds because either the outer parts of my knee and hip would hurt, or my lower back on one side right above my ass would ache and get stiff.

The first time it happened, I had a very narrow stance and I began noticing that my knees were wandering inward. I started forcing them outward deliberately with the movement. This immediately ended my squat pain until I started pushing above 225.

I have since opened up my stance and pointed my toes in an outward shape like a large \/, When I squat like this, it is a lot easier to go deeper and press outwards on my knees, which minimizes any pain in this area. I have gotten up to 325lbs this way, but have backed down due to wanting to further improve my depth and form while recovering from an unrelated injury.

Busted ribs from squatting and bad belt use
Apparently it's common to crush ribs or screw up the cartilage connecting them on squats and leg presses, because the thighs or belt can come up and press into the ribs. I normally don't use a belt at all, but decided to try with a powerlifting belt. This was mostly out of ignorance, because I didn't know much of the difference between the belt styles, but the belt pressed into and screwed up my rib cage. I had to stay off of heavy weights and did other exercises during the recovery.

Shoulder or neck pain during squats
My first squats were high-bar, which placed a lot of load on the top of my shoulders, so when I started getting around body weight, I dropped it lower on my back, which required flexing my shoulders to rest the bar on them. This ended the pain near my neck.
When I moved past 225lbs on squat, I then noticed a very sharp pain in one of my shoulders, which felt like it was inside and under the shoulder blade. I was puzzled, but when I looked up this injury I found a very specific cure for it: keep your thumbs over the bar on the squat. This allowed me to focus on balancing the bar on my back, and not pressing up as severely with my arms during squats up to 300+ pounds.

Inability to flex wrists after bench pressing
When I first learned to bench a long time ago, I had terrible form. I had the bar closer to where my fingers joined my hand than towards where my radius and ulna join the base of my wrist. This almost always results in excess wrist strain and injury. Keep the bar as close to directly in line with your forearm as possible during bench. That way, you are only using your wrist to balance it, not hold up the entire weight of 200+ pounds or whatever you bench.

Horrible rotator cuff pain
Every time I got back into weightlifting, I would inevitably injure my rotator cuffs. Sometimes, just pushing a heavy door would cause my arm to collapse from the pressure on my rotator cuff. Sometimes, using a large throw gearshift on my truck caused severe pain. It sucked.

It turns out that I was forgetting one of the first keys to bench presses: Tighten the hell out of your shoulders and abs before pressing. As soon as your hands touch the bar, before liftoff, try to squeeze your shoulder blades with as much force as you can. When I first actively did this, I was amazed at how stable it was, because I had been doing it for so long without anyone correcting my form. But, suddenly, the weight didn't drop to one side like it normally did, and I had a much more even form and more aggressive press. This was one of those things that immediately motivated me to work out harder, as a weak bench was a huge stumbling block for my development.



Thank you for reading. If you have any injuries that you've recovered from and have determined the root cause, then please contribute.

(This post was last modified: 04-18-2015 12:20 PM by philosophical_recovery.)
04-18-2015 12:18 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 18 users Like philosophical_recovery's post:
MiscBrah, The Lizard of Oz, , vinman, birdie num num, not_dead_yet, Isaac Jordan, Cr33pin, solo, Gmac, Engineer, Kizman, Zep, thoughtgypsy, Khan, CaptainChardonnay, The Man w/ the Golden Gun, Ruslan
birdie num num Offline
Recovering Beta
*

Posts: 214
Joined: Dec 2013
Reputation: 1
Post: #2
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(04-18-2015 12:18 PM)philosophical_recovery Wrote:  Thank you for reading. If you have any injuries that you've recovered from and have determined the root cause, then please contribute.

Good post and some great info. Like you, I've been suffering from chronic pain in the IT Band. It started around 6-7 months ago. Simply getting out of a chair became painful. The cause is probably age, as I'm 51. Hell, I barely knew what an IT Band was until recently. I've been lifting since I was 13, and today my routine includes barefoot front squats once per week and riding a bike up steep hills about 2-3 times per week. I don't run.

I tried foam rolling the IT for a few months but it did absolutely nothing. I can't afford a sports therapist now, so out of desperation I searched YouTube videos and found this excellent one that demonstrates IT stretches.

It's been two weeks since first viewing and implementing these stretches. The results have been phenomenal. There is still a slight bit of pain, but overall it has been drastically reduced. I'll do a quick stretch before lifting or riding and then do a lengthier session at night. This will now be a regular part of my routine.

If you are suffering from IT Band pain, then give these stretches a try.




“When you're born into this world, you're given a ticket to the freak show. If you're born in America you get a front row seat.”

- George Carlin
(This post was last modified: 04-18-2015 03:38 PM by birdie num num.)
04-18-2015 03:37 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 7 users Like birdie num num's post:
philosophical_recovery, , The Lizard of Oz, ball dont lie, Engineer, Zep, J. Spice
Isaac Jordan Offline
Wingman
***
Gold Member

Posts: 787
Joined: Oct 2012
Reputation: 95
Post: #3
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Great thread idea, thanks for posting.

A few months back I upgraded my squat form from parallel to full-on ass-to-grass. A couple weeks later I began to experience recurring pain in my left knee, so I did what I normally do when I tweak something: rest it completely until the pain goes away.

I spent a few weeks only doing upper body (with lots of walking), but the injury wouldn't quite seem to heal. Fortunately, after doing a bit of research I stumbled on this supplement:

[Image: collagen__1429485600_75.139.150.17.jpg]

Anyone who's read through the bone broth thread knows how important gelatin is:

Quote:Gelatin (also known as cooked collagen) is a wonder food with anti-inflammatory and anti-aging qualities, as it helps to fill in the missing amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) in the standard American diet.

One of the greatest benefits of using gelatin is to help balance our amino acid intake. Because collagen makes up approximately 50% of the whole animal, gelatin can be used to help create a more complete protein balance in our diet. The standard American diet tends to be very high in muscle meats (such as beef, chicken, lamb and turkey), which when not balanced by other proteins (such as eggs, fish, dairy, shellfish, organ meats) can contribute to inflammation over time.

Gelatin has a unique and very non-inflammatory amino acid profile, primarily consisting of glycine, glutamic acid, proline, and alanine (tryptophan and several other amino acids are completely missing). Although these are non-essential amino acids (meaning your body can make them), many malnourished and over-stressed livers are not able to manufacture all the non-essential amino acids in the amounts demanded by the body. The liver needs an abundance of these proteins to keep functioning optimally, particularly to fuel phase 2 detoxification. This helps your body “take out the trash” in our toxic world, reducing inflammation!

I started adding two tablespoons to my pre-workout shake, and would take an additional two tablespoons with my post-workout protein, or with dinner if the meal happened to be mostly muscle meat (so as to balance the amino acid profile entering my bloodstream).

Like magic, within a week my pain was gone. I've continued to use the collagen near-daily, and have increased all my lifts consistently the past three months without any more pain. I believe my diet was to blame, and hopefully once I move this summer it'll be easier to get quality non-muscle meat. Until then, this product has been a godsend.

I used the Great Lakes brand from the picture above (go for the green collagen hydrolysate version specifically, it blends much more easily in both hot and cold liquids). Amazon sells the product, but if you buy in bulk on the company's website they offer you a much better deal per canister. Just be careful taking too much at first-you'll experience some digestive issues if your body isn't used to the dosage. Start with a tablespoon, and add an additional half-tablespoon every day until you're up to 4-6/day.
(This post was last modified: 04-19-2015 06:29 PM by Isaac Jordan.)
04-19-2015 06:28 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 5 users Like Isaac Jordan's post:
philosophical_recovery, Biz, Prince X, Cr33pin, Zona
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #4
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
An update:

I have a minor injury that is fucking up my squats big time. I can't get 3/4 of the weight up, and did one pathetic 160lb squat today but the pain was enough to get me to stop. Frustrated over the lack of gains, I decided to do some research.

Mark Rippetoe
pointed to The Starr Protocol, and doing some more searching it appears that this is good for exercises that are not full tears or are merely pulls. If your injury is not a muscle but a supporting structure then don't do this. Since my injury is minor but it is screwing me up pretty bad on squats, I plan on running this as an experiment and seeing if it works.

Rip Wrote:Whatever caused it, here is the tried-and-true injury rehab method for muscle-belly injuries we got from Starr and that has worked for years better than any other method I've ever used. Wait 3-4 days until the pain starts to "blur",which indicates that the immediate process of healing has stopped the bleeding and has started to repair the tissue. Then use an exercise that directly works the injury, i.e. that makes it hurt, in this case the squat. Use the empty bar and do 3 sets of 25 with perfect form, allowing yourself NO favoring the injured side. If it's ready to rehab you will know by the pain: if the pain increases during the set, it's not ready, if it stays the same or feels a little better toward the end of the set, it is ready to work.

The NEXT DAY do it again, and add a small amount of weight, like 45 x 25 x 2 , 55 x 25. Next day, 45 x 25, 55 x 25, 65 x 25. Continue adding weight every day, increasing as much as you can tolerate each workout. It will hurt, and it's supposed to hurt, but you should be able to tell the difference between rehab pain and re-injury. If you can't, you will figure it out soon enough. This method works by flushing blood through the injury while forcing the tissue to reorganize in its normal pattern of contractile architecture.

After 10 days of 25s, go up in weight and down in reps to 15s, then to 10s, and finally to fives. During this time do NO OTHER HEAVY WORK, so that your resources can focus on the injury. You should be fixed in about 2 weeks, squatting more than you hurt yourself with.

This method has the advantage of preventing scar formation in the muscle belly, since the muscle is forced to heal in the context of work and normal contraction, using the movement pattern it normally uses. The important points are 1.) perfect form with 2.) light weights that can be handled for high reps, 3.) every day for two weeks, and 4.) no other heavy work that will interfere with the system-wide processes of healing the tear.

It is also very important through the whole process of healing the injury that ice be used, during the initial phase after the injury and after the workouts. Use it 20 on/20 off, many times a day at first and then tapering off to morning, after the workout, and before bed. Ice is your best friend in a muscle belly injury, holding down inflammation and fluid accumulation ("swelling") while at the same time increasing beneficial blood flow through the injury. But DO NOT USE ICE MORE THAN 20 MINUTES AT A TIME. More than that can cause more damage than it repairs.

This may actually be the most useful post on this entire little forum of mine, and if you use this method exactly you can save yourself many weeks of lost training and long-term problems with muscle-belly scarring. Try it and see.


This Fitness Stackexchange discussion points to the theory behind why this works
:
Quote:Regarding a controlled study of this particular rehab protocol, you won't find one. The problem is that there are several rehab protocols, and as long as it is founded on rational principles they all will work.

However, in regards to scar tissue formation, you will find many resources, including a short article on Medical News Today:

When the body is injured it sends fibroblasts to the area.
Initially it grows within the clot to help stop the bleeding and connect the two sides of the tear
The fibroblasts grow stiffer over time, and eventually contract to pull the sides together.

A quote from the article may shed some light on the subject at hand:

The reported research reveals for the first time that a mechanical mechanism is crucial for this switch from migrating to contractile cells. To make this change, the fibroblasts need to get at their "spinach" -- the growth factor sitting in the matrix which, once liberated, stimulates the production of smooth-muscle proteins. Previously, researchers postulated that the fibroblasts did this by digesting the matrix. But EPFL scientist Boris Hinz, doctoral student Pierre-Jean Wipff and their colleagues have discovered that the cells unlock the growth factor via a purely mechanical process.

Referenced Paper: Pierre-Jean Wipff, Daniel B. Rifkin, Jean-Jacques Meister and Boris Hinz, "Myofibroblast contraction activates latent TGF-b from the extracellular matrix", Journal of Cell Biology, December 17, 2007.

Another less scientific article on LiveStrong also sheds some light on the subject. Essentially, part of the healing process is regaining full range of motion as soon as possible. There are further references at the bottom of the article if you are inclined to read more.

Applying This Information to the Bill Star Rehab Protocol

Considering that scar tissue is formed through natural healing processes using the fibroblasts, and that full range of motion in the injured area helps the fibroblasts do its job more efficiently, the only thing left is to define full range of motion for your muscle-belly. Squats, being a full body exercise do get just about every muscle involved.

However, there is a balance. Obviously, you do not want to re-injure the area. Just about every rehab protocol I have seen features very high reps at very low weights. The purpose is to get blood flowing though the area which does two things:

Flushes out inflammation, fluids, and repair byproducts
Provides fresh oxygen, blood, etc. to the area

The combination of the mechanical motion of the light weight squats, and the blood flowing through the area provides favorable conditions for minimizing scar tissue. The important aspect is to just do the rehab protocol and no other work until. Heavy work too soon will re-injure the area.

Will report in after I see how it goes. Going to go hit a bunch of 45lb squats.

05-13-2015 07:16 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
RexImperator Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 5,423
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 27
Post: #5
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
I did that rehab protocol back in January after a bad muscle tear. It sucked big time, but I do think it helped.

If only you knew how bad things really are.
05-13-2015 07:57 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes RexImperator's post:
philosophical_recovery
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #6
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-13-2015 07:57 PM)RexImperator Wrote:  I did that rehab protocol back in January after a bad muscle tear. It sucked big time, but I do think it helped.

Do you have any more details? I'm very interested in this.

05-13-2015 08:08 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
RexImperator Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 5,423
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 27
Post: #7
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
I injured my adductor and abdominal while squatting. Couldn't really do anything for almost a week it was so painful. Then started with bodyweight, then the bar, and so on like the protocol says. Eventually I worked back into heavier weights and then a regular progression. I did a lot of stretching, too.

Basically it was 25 rep sets for a week, then 15 rep sets for half a week, then 10 rep sets for half a week, and then back into 5s and working the weight up again.

Those 25s get super tiring even though the weight is light.

If only you knew how bad things really are.
(This post was last modified: 05-13-2015 08:25 PM by RexImperator.)
05-13-2015 08:17 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes RexImperator's post:
philosophical_recovery
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #8
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Thanks for providing more details. I didn't know about this routine until today and I was depressed over the possibility of laying of squats for long enough for my pull to heal. It sounds like you had a much more severe injury than me and it worked out fine.

05-13-2015 09:36 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
RexImperator Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 5,423
Joined: May 2013
Reputation: 27
Post: #9
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
You'll probably be able to work with heavy weights even before it heals up 100%. The rehab protocol is a lot about stimulating blood flow. Keep training and keep the range of motion up.

One key thing is to concentrate on good form while doing it.

If only you knew how bad things really are.
(This post was last modified: 05-13-2015 10:24 PM by RexImperator.)
05-13-2015 10:22 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Gmac Offline
Innovative Casanova
*******
Gold Member

Posts: 6,695
Joined: Mar 2011
Reputation: 146
Post: #10
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(04-18-2015 03:37 PM)birdie num num Wrote:  
(04-18-2015 12:18 PM)philosophical_recovery Wrote:  Thank you for reading. If you have any injuries that you've recovered from and have determined the root cause, then please contribute.

Good post and some great info. Like you, I've been suffering from chronic pain in the IT Band. It started around 6-7 months ago. Simply getting out of a chair became painful. The cause is probably age, as I'm 51. Hell, I barely knew what an IT Band was until recently. I've been lifting since I was 13, and today my routine includes barefoot front squats once per week and riding a bike up steep hills about 2-3 times per week. I don't run.

I tried foam rolling the IT for a few months but it did absolutely nothing. I can't afford a sports therapist now, so out of desperation I searched YouTube videos and found this excellent one that demonstrates IT stretches.

It's been two weeks since first viewing and implementing these stretches. The results have been phenomenal. There is still a slight bit of pain, but overall it has been drastically reduced. I'll do a quick stretch before lifting or riding and then do a lengthier session at night. This will now be a regular part of my routine.

If you are suffering from IT Band pain, then give these stretches a try.




This is a great stretch I'd completely forgotten about. I've had issues with my IT since I increased my running distance and have begun to cut back for fear of the continued inflammation and pain while running and walking.

Vice-Captain - #TeamWaitAndSee
05-15-2015 06:49 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Gmac's post:
philosophical_recovery
Foolsgo1d Offline
Innovative Casanova
*******

Posts: 6,748
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 27
Post: #11
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
My tried and tested methods

- Foam roller
- Tennis/Lacrosse ball
- Stretching after weights
- Warm up sets
- Warm down
- Stop when an ache or pounding throbbing occurs

- Always be conscious of how you do back squats or front squats. If you back begins to round then it will become an issue through scar tissue build-up.

- Wear wrist wraps for pressing movements and front squats

- Don't go balls to the wall 'you need to lift this hard and fast' mode

- Rest days or light workouts. If you don't feel right then it may not be your day for a good session. I suffer from guilt if I don't go but that is because I worry some excess carbs and sugars don't get obliterated by the workout I missed Laugh

- Don't go when you're sick. You get a cold and you want to work it off? Stay home and do a workout please. Keeps others from catching it and you will prevent additional stress from occupying your system


I can't give advice on rehabbing broken bones or herniated discs as I have had none of those. The closest I came to total injury was due to a shoulder injury from pressing.

Poor technique and OTT training did it in. I backed off, rehabbed the affected area and trained smarter. Once you suffer a major injury you might not be the same again.
05-15-2015 10:09 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Foolsgo1d's post:
philosophical_recovery
kbell Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 5,026
Joined: Jul 2011
Reputation: 27
Post: #12
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
I have been having a tightness and slight pain in my front delts and also on the traps. I think it might be due to knot in the trapezius. A trainer took this 3d video of me doing a standing benchpress and saw the overcompensation that way. Pretty cool iphone app. What he recommended was to use a peanut I think its called (two tennis balls taped together) placed at the bottom of the traps. You than lie down on it, put your head toward the floor and lift your arms over your head and attempt a Y with them. It hurts, but it did relax the muscle a bit. I guess I will have to do that before I bench from now on. It similar in pain to foam rolling a knotted muscle.
(This post was last modified: 05-15-2015 04:47 PM by kbell.)
05-15-2015 04:46 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #13
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-15-2015 04:46 PM)kbell Wrote:  I have been having a tightness and slight pain in my front delts and also on the traps. I think it might be due to knot in the trapezius. A trainer took this 3d video of me doing a standing benchpress and saw the overcompensation that way. Pretty cool iphone app. What he recommended was to use a peanut I think its called (two tennis balls taped together) placed at the bottom of the traps. You than lie down on it, put your head toward the floor and lift your arms over your head and attempt a Y with them. It hurts, but it did relax the muscle a bit. I guess I will have to do that before I bench from now on. It similar in pain to foam rolling a knotted muscle.

Huh, are you 100% sure it's the delts/traps and not a rotator cuff? I have had similar pain, but I usually trace it back to a rotator cuff. Bench always gave me problems because of this, and being really careful with setup and shoulder tightness before pressing has eliminated this.

If it is in fact delts or traps, I'd be interested in knowing exactly what movement it is that is causing it. Can you replicate it in a situation other than laying on the floor?

05-17-2015 04:49 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
kbell Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 5,026
Joined: Jul 2011
Reputation: 27
Post: #14
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Yep standing up. My left arm does not fulling extend like the right arm if I try to reach straight up and toward my head. I have some new stretchy band scalpula strengthing exercises and more stretches for that area.
05-17-2015 05:17 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes kbell's post:
philosophical_recovery
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #15
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
5 day update on the Starr Protocol:

Rippetoe wasn't joking when he said to lay off other heavy lifts when doing this. 75 squats a day, increasing by 10lbs each day, without rest days, really drains you. I'm switching to accessory workouts and easing off bench, deads, and rows until this is through. I'll probably need to back those lifts down another couple weeks as well.

Such is lifting life.

I've also noticed better flexibility and depth on my squats, as well as small form tweaks that weren't as obvious at high weight.

05-18-2015 02:50 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
kinjutsu Offline
True Player
*****

Posts: 1,631
Joined: Jul 2011
Reputation: 18
Post: #16
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-15-2015 04:46 PM)kbell Wrote:  I have been having a tightness and slight pain in my front delts and also on the traps. I think it might be due to knot in the trapezius. A trainer took this 3d video of me doing a standing benchpress and saw the overcompensation that way. Pretty cool iphone app. What he recommended was to use a peanut I think its called (two tennis balls taped together) placed at the bottom of the traps. You than lie down on it, put your head toward the floor and lift your arms over your head and attempt a Y with them. It hurts, but it did relax the muscle a bit. I guess I will have to do that before I bench from now on. It similar in pain to foam rolling a knotted muscle.

I had an issue with my left trap muscle being overly tight.
It was suggested to me to try these but use a Thera band instead of a the wooden staff he uses in the video. The thera band allows more range of motion because it stretches and allows the the area to warm up properly.




My Twitter

You can't get lucky all the time, but you can be smart everyday though...
05-19-2015 04:54 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
not_dead_yet Offline
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 347
Joined: Sep 2012
Reputation: 2
Post: #17
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-13-2015 09:36 PM)philosophical_recovery Wrote:  Thanks for providing more details. I didn't know about this routine until today and I was depressed over the possibility of laying of squats for long enough for my pull to heal. It sounds like you had a much more severe injury than me and it worked out fine.

I managed to pull a muscle in my lower back this past Friday doing a warmup squat set. Confused I don't think it's anything serious. I've been taking it easy for four days, as Rip suggests, and the pain is nowhere near what it was Friday night.

I'm going to try the Starr protocol starting today. I'll post to this thread with updates.

"I'm not worried about fucking terrorism, man. I was married for two fucking years. What are they going to do, scare me?"
05-19-2015 08:11 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes not_dead_yet's post:
philosophical_recovery
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #18
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-19-2015 08:11 AM)not_dead_yet Wrote:  
(05-13-2015 09:36 PM)philosophical_recovery Wrote:  Thanks for providing more details. I didn't know about this routine until today and I was depressed over the possibility of laying of squats for long enough for my pull to heal. It sounds like you had a much more severe injury than me and it worked out fine.

I managed to pull a muscle in my lower back this past Friday doing a warmup squat set. Confused I don't think it's anything serious. I've been taking it easy for four days, as Rip suggests, and the pain is nowhere near what it was Friday night.

I'm going to try the Starr protocol starting today. I'll post to this thread with updates.

Please do, and be careful with it. My lower back has been sore the most while doing it, aside from getting a massive leg pump. It would be a very good time to ensure you have proper form with a straight back. My back seemed to be ok, but part of the reason I think I injured myself was favoring one side and having bad depth control. Focus really hard on those reps, it's going to be a challenge.

05-19-2015 08:34 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
not_dead_yet Offline
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 347
Joined: Sep 2012
Reputation: 2
Post: #19
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-19-2015 08:34 AM)philosophical_recovery Wrote:  Please do, and be careful with it. My lower back has been sore the most while doing it, aside from getting a massive leg pump. It would be a very good time to ensure you have proper form with a straight back. My back seemed to be ok, but part of the reason I think I injured myself was favoring one side and having bad depth control. Focus really hard on those reps, it's going to be a challenge.

First day down, no problems. I did get a little short of breath as I was taking a deep breath and holding it prior to each squat to prevent any movement in my back.

My back was kinked to one side before the set -- I've definitely evened out now. I'm a little sore, but I can walk with my normal posture instead of being bent.

My squat has always been problematic. First, I had the bar too high. Then too low. Then I got it just right, and boom, hurt myself during warmup. C'est la vie.

"I'm not worried about fucking terrorism, man. I was married for two fucking years. What are they going to do, scare me?"
05-19-2015 02:47 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes not_dead_yet's post:
philosophical_recovery
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #20
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Thanks for updating. Let us know how it works out after a week or so. Glad to hear that it seems to be working.

05-19-2015 03:28 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #21
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Day 6 update:

Following the Starr Protocol as stated, did 85, 95, then 105 with 25 reps each. This is the first day I noticed no pain in my hip flexor, which was the problem, during the full depth of the squat.

I'm not sure if it's just the program, or the stretching, massaging, and foam rolling I hit the area with last night. Maybe the fascia there was tight? All I know is it hurt like a mother to foam roll there.

I'm getting anxious to hit the big weight again, but it's not time. If you can massage or foam roll the area afterward, I recommend it.

05-19-2015 07:34 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Grad Offline
Male Feminist

Posts: 11
Joined: Apr 2015
Reputation: 0
Post: #22
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
First , let us understand some things :

Exercise can only cause 2 things :

1. Physical Stress- The stress causes a adaptive response which will cause the biological entity to survive and grow or if the stress is too much survive and weaken or die.
2. Injury- occurs when the the biological entity encounters a force either acute or chronic that exceeds the structural integrity of the joint /muscle and will thus fail.

Your body becoming bigger and stronger is an adaptive response to a stress.

So if you want to prevent injury. Obviously one has to apply a stress(Exercise). Weight training specifically. Stay off all aerobic activity. It will do more harm than good.

Newton: F= MxA

As acceleration goes up force goes up exponentially. So keep your movements slow. Eg. bench press. Concentric contraction (Pushing up) at normal speed. Eccentric contraction ( going down) as slow as possible. Keep the force down by keeping acceleration down. it takes momentum out and keeps muscular work high.

As long as force is kept down to a minimum your chances of injury is low.

Remember that your volume has to decrease as well.

Intensity(momentary effort) and time is inversely proportional. The harder you train the time has to decrease. You cannot train hard for a long period. The higher your intensity the shorter the training time. If you training for more than 45min then your intensity is low. Your results will come but take longer. You exposing your body to more stress.

Recovery.
Please note that there is no such thing "Active Rest" Train upper body let lower body rest .......etc thats complete bullshit. You cant shut off the legs as rest and train upper body. The entire system experiences a stress period.

After applying a stress(exercise), minimum of 72hours of rest , complete rest for your body to make a turnaround. Depending on your genetics recovery time could be more or less. For me(hardgainer). I train once every 6 days.

If you have an injury :
R-Rest
I-Ice
C-compression
E- Elevation

Chronic injuries:

1. See a doctor
2. See a physical therapist post injury for 3 days. ( prefer 24 hours after injury)
3. Rest - until pain free
4. Rehab - slow movements

Red Pill - Magazines(Muscle and fitness etc, )
Blue Pill - Arthur Jones (Founder - nautilus)
05-20-2015 07:05 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
not_dead_yet Offline
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 347
Joined: Sep 2012
Reputation: 2
Post: #23
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
(05-13-2015 08:17 PM)RexImperator Wrote:  Basically it was 25 rep sets for a week, then 15 rep sets for half a week, then 10 rep sets for half a week, and then back into 5s and working the weight up again.

Reading the description of the protocol makes it sound like you should be doing 25s for 10 days, not a week. Can I ask why you dialed it back?

"I'm not worried about fucking terrorism, man. I was married for two fucking years. What are they going to do, scare me?"
05-20-2015 09:52 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #24
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
I'll let Rex speak for himself, but increasing 10lbs every day from the bar got me to 95 105 115 today. However, I did 25 on 95, 20 on 105, followed by 15 on 105. I think it was too much of a weight increase for me, and the 7th day in the row of this left my tank empty.

05-20-2015 01:41 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
philosophical_recovery Offline
International Playboy
******
Gold Member

Posts: 3,600
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 67
Post: #25
RE: The Injury Prevention and Recovery Thread
Update:

Followed the Starr Protocol for 10 days, missing one, getting up to 185 with 15 reps before I decided I needed a break. Pain is mostly gone. Did 3x355 on my last set today and felt solid.

The high reps every day for 10 days really impacted my overall energy levels, but it seemed to work. I feel a lot better going full depth on 255 without pain.

05-29-2015 01:11 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  How can I work out around a shoulder injury? Horus 33 4,758 05-17-2019 05:13 PM
Last Post: LeeEnfield303
  Barbell training and back injury and recovery MOVSM 11 1,134 03-08-2019 01:28 PM
Last Post: Lermontov
  Starting Strength Injury Advice Saucey! 55 26,506 09-10-2018 10:59 PM
Last Post: Dulceácido

Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | RooshV.com | Return to Top | Return to Content | Mobile Version | RSS Syndication