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Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
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Robert JS Offline
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Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
The Economist published an article today entitled "The Weaker Sex".

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21...weaker-sex

I don't think I should copy and paste the article here due to copyright restrictions.

The gist of the article is that while blue collar men are struggling to find a role in the workplace, women have more marketable skillsets and are surging into sectors such as health care and education.

There is a surprising amount of 'Red Pill' knowledge in the comments. And a suprising amount of upvotes for the most staunchly Red Pill comments.

This is the top comment, with 90 'Recommends':

Quote:Years ago on my first day teaching I was given a stack of student dossiers for my twenty-four homeroom students who were divided exactly by sex. Nine of the twelve boys were medicated to "control" behavior. Not one of the girls was medicated.

I have watched it all become worse. As well intentioned as I hope I am, I spend more time per capita teaching females because they are easier to interest and discipline. Boys require a lot of work. Last week we inducted the new members of NHS -- about a dozen kids and not one male. I cannot remember only one year when the valedictorian was a male and my AP classes are overwhelmingly female.

One out of six black males is in prison or on parole. Trade agreements flooded America with goods made at peon wages while young men cannot find forty-hour work weeks in their own America. Men are steadily decreasing as a proportion of college students. It goes on and on.

And, liberals insist there is a "War On Women."

Men are characterized -- including in this essay -- as "layabouts." If we were to refer to single-mothers as "sluts" the comments section would go berserk -- but "layabouts?"

Boys are regarded by the media, liberals and feminists as each a potential rapist. It is as if none of these youngsters had sisters they loved or mothers whom they respect. A piece of trash like "A Rape On Campus" is not only published but when its incompetence is clearly proven no one even gets fired at RS.

As men's education and earnings decline a totally expected thing occurs: they drag women down with them. Women no longer even expect a phone call the next morning. Why should they? It's a liberated world.

Boys grow up without a male adult role model, never learn to behave as mature male adults and thus end up on the streets, out of school and in jail. Again, fine with the Left -- no one must even suggest that children benefit from two parents in the home.

We don't even know where to start. But, here are some thoughts:

* Start protecting our manufacturing base, or what is left of it, and to hell with tenured economists and academic Presidents who think otherwise. Give kids of both sexes a chance at a decent job.

* Stop privileging girls in education and start investing more in male education: this must mean on ALL levels of education.

* Stop the demonizing of men in the media. If what the media does to males it did to blacks you can bet Erick Holder would have been on the first plane to Hollywood.

* Begin to reeducate our society toward the value of nuclear families and stop this pernicious nonsense about "There are many kinds of families."

* Finally, disregard the lies, narcissism and downright evil of the feminist Left: its hatred of men, its massive self-pity and all the rest of that sort of thing.

TE's article was insulting and condescending toward males and, especially, young males. But, at least it is a start, however feeble.
(This post was last modified: 05-30-2015 12:02 PM by Robert JS.)
05-30-2015 11:08 AM
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iknowexactly Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Red Pill Comments on Economist Article
I don't think 1/6 black males is in prison or parole, at least not technically. "Parole" is a lot different than "Probation"-- a parolee is a more severe fuck-up released early from prison but still serving his sentence. Probation is more when they think you aren't totally lost yet.

As far as 1/6 being on Probation, parole, or in prison, that might be closer to the truth.


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05-30-2015 11:12 AM
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lskdfjldsf Offline
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Post: #3
RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
This comment stuck out the most to me:

Quote:George Wallace. A presidential candidate ('68) of his breed may eventually challenge the status quo in America in a manner similar to that posed in France by Marine LePen.

Neither Left nor Right on the political spectrum. Simply angry.

And here we are, all walks of life, neither Left nor Right on the political spectrum, simply angry at the lies we've been fed and at those responsible for it all.
05-30-2015 02:14 PM
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Disco_Volante Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
I find it bizarre people still think academic performance indicates intelligence.

Those types of 'do gooders' in school end up accountants, middle management, or doctors slaving 70 hours a week paying a 50% tax rate. They don't really question anything, they think school is the end-all to everything and do whatever they're told.

That's why business owners / inventors are still entirely men, you have to take wild risks and disregard instruction to do something major.
Kids who get straight A's are just useful drones for a corporation created by an entrepreneur. They usually can't handle the real world since there's a lot less structure to success the way there is in academia.

Furthermore, these young women who are 'taking over' the workforce don't realize the buzzsaw they're walking into. 20 trillion of debt, ballooning healthcare costs, increased government dependency. They will be required to pay for all that shit, and the more successful women wont be able to find a suitable beta (with a good job) to bail them out.

I know a woman who just finished dental school 2 years ago, already took a fucking part-time teaching gig at the dental school. Never intended to serve her community or build a practice, just immediately cashed out into a cushy part time teaching gig so she doesn't have to work 70 hours a week building her own practice. None of these women on the honor roll in school intend to work the 60+ hours a week required of powerful people.
Once they hit the real world they immediately look for their first escape from working, whether that's marriage or some part time gig.
(This post was last modified: 05-30-2015 02:24 PM by Disco_Volante.)
05-30-2015 02:20 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
This article made me throw up in my mouth a little.

The tone seemed so unprofessional and moralizing. I hate bitchy writers like this. Who wrote this article?

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05-30-2015 03:10 PM
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Tytalus Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
Quote:"Blue-collar" jobs are not about using muscle instead of brains to work. Blue-collar jobs must be learned by doing them because they require skills that involve coordination, muscle memory, and spatial awareness. There has never been an accountant or financial worker anywhere who used his brain half as much, or half as effectively, as a good machinist. We did away with skilled jobs because they required too much training, too great an investment in workers who might then demand compensation in line with their worth. No, we certainly did not grow past those jobs technologically. Automated manufacturing requires teams of specially trained and highly skilled workers: that is why we dismantled our factories and sent the work to places where labor is paid a bare subsistence, and union organizers are shot summarily. The production processes that produced your vacuum cleaner were much more highly automated thirty years ago. Except for very simple pick and place work, people are cheaper than robots. Especially scared people who dare not ask why the world needs another fifty thousand plastic doll heads today instead of better hospitals and schools.
As a process design engineer with degrees in electronics and computer engineering, I can state flatly that the most easily automated workflows in any business are office workflows. Current computer technology could permanently erase 95% of cubicle tasks very easily. Try running that IT project proposal past the Bean Counter in Chief. We have created a false economy of so-called knowledge-worker "service" jobs precisely because most of those positions require nothing a 10-year-old could not learn in half a day-- other than the sycophancy and the conformism, that is.
Why marginalize skilled work? Why the incessant disrespect for Anyone who actually knows how to produce something or make something work? Why turn the workforce of the entire western world into a pack of timid clerks whose chief skills are flattery and putting up with endless tedium and stupidity? Ah, that would be a question for a real newspaper, not a finance industry sock-puppet.

Damn these comments are golden.
05-30-2015 06:44 PM
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Peregrine Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-30-2015 06:44 PM)Tytalus Wrote:  
Quote:"Blue-collar" jobs are not about using muscle instead of brains to work. Blue-collar jobs must be learned by doing them because they require skills that involve coordination, muscle memory, and spatial awareness. There has never been an accountant or financial worker anywhere who used his brain half as much, or half as effectively, as a good machinist. We did away with skilled jobs because they required too much training, too great an investment in workers who might then demand compensation in line with their worth. No, we certainly did not grow past those jobs technologically. Automated manufacturing requires teams of specially trained and highly skilled workers: that is why we dismantled our factories and sent the work to places where labor is paid a bare subsistence, and union organizers are shot summarily. The production processes that produced your vacuum cleaner were much more highly automated thirty years ago. Except for very simple pick and place work, people are cheaper than robots. Especially scared people who dare not ask why the world needs another fifty thousand plastic doll heads today instead of better hospitals and schools.
As a process design engineer with degrees in electronics and computer engineering, I can state flatly that the most easily automated workflows in any business are office workflows. Current computer technology could permanently erase 95% of cubicle tasks very easily. Try running that IT project proposal past the Bean Counter in Chief. We have created a false economy of so-called knowledge-worker "service" jobs precisely because most of those positions require nothing a 10-year-old could not learn in half a day-- other than the sycophancy and the conformism, that is.
Why marginalize skilled work? Why the incessant disrespect for Anyone who actually knows how to produce something or make something work? Why turn the workforce of the entire western world into a pack of timid clerks whose chief skills are flattery and putting up with endless tedium and stupidity? Ah, that would be a question for a real newspaper, not a finance industry sock-puppet.

Damn these comments are golden.

While a finance industry sock puppet like the Economist will not explore such questions, perhaps we can do so here.

He's right - a lot of office work can be easily automated. Why hasn't that happened en masse?
05-30-2015 07:26 PM
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ball dont lie Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-30-2015 02:20 PM)Disco_Volante Wrote:  I know a woman who just finished dental school 2 years ago, already took a fucking part-time teaching gig at the dental school. Never intended to serve her community or build a practice, just immediately cashed out into a cushy part time teaching gig so she doesn't have to work 70 hours a week building her own practice. None of these women on the honor roll in school intend to work the 60+ hours a week required of powerful people.
Once they hit the real world they immediately look for their first escape from working, whether that's marriage or some part time gig.

Spot on. All the women with real brains that I know:
1) Are very feminine.
2) Went to law school or medical school.
3) Married the alpha in her class either during school (dropped out Ms. degree style) or the first year or two of work.
4) Are stay at home moms or do part time work mostly to keep busy.

The only women who work like slaves are idiots. If some good looking woman who liked to fuck a lot was cool with supporting me I would stay home for a while and work on business ideas.
05-30-2015 10:59 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-30-2015 07:26 PM)Peregrine Wrote:  While a finance industry sock puppet like the Economist will not explore such questions, perhaps we can do so here.

He's right - a lot of office work can be easily automated. Why hasn't that happened en masse?

Eventually, it will although I suspect companies like McDonald's will start doing that in response to a rise in the minimum wage.

Oh yes, I'm so privileged you literally can't even.
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05-30-2015 11:03 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-30-2015 07:26 PM)Peregrine Wrote:  While a finance industry sock puppet like the Economist will not explore such questions, perhaps we can do so here.

He's right - a lot of office work can be easily automated. Why hasn't that happened en masse?

It will as bankruptcy sets in. There won't be enough money to pay women to fill out forms on a computer all day.

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05-30-2015 11:20 PM
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Cattle Rustler Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-30-2015 11:03 PM)Porfirio Rubirosa Wrote:  
(05-30-2015 07:26 PM)Peregrine Wrote:  While a finance industry sock puppet like the Economist will not explore such questions, perhaps we can do so here.

He's right - a lot of office work can be easily automated. Why hasn't that happened en masse?

Eventually, it will although I suspect companies like McDonald's will start doing that in response to a rise in the minimum wage.

It's already happening brah...

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(This post was last modified: 05-31-2015 12:37 AM by Cattle Rustler.)
05-31-2015 12:05 AM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
^
There you have it.

Oh yes, I'm so privileged you literally can't even.
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05-31-2015 12:28 AM
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malc Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
Partly because its a custom excel spreadsheet, and partly because good software engineers are a scarce commodity, making 6 figures at a tech company. And the automation is getting there, with new companies such as zenifits and older ones such as paychex.

I don't know what is most office work although, because I don't work in that kind of environment.
05-31-2015 12:42 AM
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Lucky Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
That article links to the cover story of this month's edition of The Economist called Manhood.

One excerpt caught my attention:

Quote:And [men] lack the resources of training, of imagination and of opportunity to adapt to the new demands. As a result, they miss out on a lot, both in economic terms and in personal ones.

Roosh wrote about this type of man in his short story The Denouncer:

Quote:Brad’s only fault in life was that he was an average man. He was destined not to greatness, but to having a mediocre job in a mediocre town with mediocre entertainments to fill his time. Getting out of the hole that Katie put him in was too great a task. Someone more capable would have thought of other options beyond what he was about to do, but Brad believed this was the only way to end his pain.

It's interesting that mainstream media outlets are recognizing that there is a growing population of men who are adrift.
05-31-2015 04:37 AM
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Foolsgo1d Offline
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
It doesn't explore the numbers of men who are trapped. A mortgage, wife, children and other financial traps make you think twice about jumping ship, unless it is suicide but that is a different kettle of fish.
05-31-2015 07:33 AM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
More interesting excerpts from the essay:

Quote:Orlando Redden is in his mid-40s and sporadically employed. He is big, strong and, by all accounts, a hard worker. But he is inarticulate, hazy about numbers and has no skills that would make an employer sit up and take notice. He has bounced from job to job throughout his adult life: minding the slot machines in a casino, driving a forklift, working as a groundskeeper, and so on.

Quote:Mikel Davis, a polite 29-year-old, is typical. He graduated from high school a decade ago and got “caught up in the street,” he says. “My mind wasn’t there. I wasn’t dedicated to the right.”
He started to deal small quantities of marijuana. He was caught, briefly jailed and released on probation. “I haven’t peed dirty since,” he says, but with a criminal record “finding a job was hell.”

Two guys down on their luck, one with a criminal background and one with a limited intellect. Let's see how they're doing in terms of getting laid...

Quote: Mr. Redden has three children by three women. Mr Davis has two children by two. Neither man lives with any of the mothers or any of their children. Mr Davis supports both of his, he says: one, financially; the other, by visiting and helping around the home. He says he is still friendly with one mother, but “not in a committed relationship”.

Multiple children with multiple women. Every smart guy I know isn't reproducing and these two idiots are cranking out kids with multiple baby mommas. Society has fallen of a fucking cliff.
05-31-2015 08:45 AM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
I'm surprised this comment made it through. I recently left a red pill comment on an Economist article and the mods deleted it.
05-31-2015 02:19 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
What happens when it's not just the uneducated that become redundant due to technology, but also the software engineers and accountants?
05-31-2015 02:57 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
It's funny - when men do well in one segment of the economy (like the tech industry), people get enraged and men get told how their success is a result of "male privilege" and more evidence of why we need feminism. When men don't do well, they get scolded for not working harder, get called layabouts, and are lectured about how they're either unwilling, or unable, to accept and adapt to women's rising success.
(This post was last modified: 05-31-2015 03:05 PM by Renzy.)
05-31-2015 02:58 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-31-2015 02:57 PM)DjembaDjemba Wrote:  What happens when it's not just the uneducated that become redundant due to technology, but also the software engineers and accountants?

An accountant provides services that cannot be automated, such as assurances. Society does not currently allow robots to sign off on financial statements.
05-31-2015 03:47 PM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
There are so many excellent red pill comments for this article, it is exciting to see more and more men waking up to the shit sandwich that is feminism.

I believe the reason the elitists push feminism is because it is a very easy/popular movement for the mass of average idiots to accept and at the same time slows population growth. The entire west is seeing their birthrates drop through the floor thanks to feminism. The difference in how women behave and how women relate to men from the 1980's to today in 2015 is almost a complete opposite. The feminist goal of separating men and women has been very successful and as a result the population growth is slowing down.

The fact is, as technology advances, the need for human bodies becomes less and less. Machines can and now do replace much of the tasks we used to perform. So sadly I see a stronger and stronger push for feminism in the west and women becoming more and more insecure and just weird.
06-01-2015 04:40 AM
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RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
(05-31-2015 03:47 PM)Peregrine Wrote:  
(05-31-2015 02:57 PM)DjembaDjemba Wrote:  What happens when it's not just the uneducated that become redundant due to technology, but also the software engineers and accountants?

An accountant provides services that cannot be automated, such as assurances. Society does not currently allow robots to sign off on financial statements.

Ideally yes, but very few jobs are safe these days.

When I was still working in the finance industry, I remember the casual offshoring of work that junior accountants used to perform.

When an aspiring accountant is looking to attain articling experience to have their CGA, CMA, or CA hours signed off they have to do articling for a minimum of two years. Usually gruelling work, long hours, and shoddy pay. Nevertheless like a first year investment banker, it's a position necessary to facilitate experience so one can become a senior accountant with letters behind his name.

What has happened in the past few years is companies are finding creative ways to cut costs. They call up accounting firms in India, where the work can be done for a fraction of the cost of paying even a junior accountant. They e-mail the financial statements and pertinent info to an office in Bangalore or Delhi, where the work is done. The completed task is then e-mailed back. Now instead of needing a 10 junior accountants, the company may need 1, maybe 2 just to sort the e-mails out and send them organized to the senior accountant. Now attaining a CMA, CGA, or CA are harder than ever before. Good if you're one of those already qualified, however not so good in the future when there'a shortage of workers with designations, and further operations have to be offshored due to this shortage.

One has to keep in mind that to even be considered for articling, a potential junior accountant has to complete the academic portion of their designation, which is usually long, hard, and expensive, and of course requires a university degree first.

This showed me that no matter how lofty, or lowly a job is, it's possible to offshore or automate it, or both as soon as technology permits.

Women will have the slight edge in the short term future because the non off-shorable positions are nurturing in nature, teachers, nurses, caregivers, and so on. Mark that with a large asterisk however, because I'm sure one day even those will be on the chopping block. Chappie may me changing our diaper one day.

Men are being hit hardest now because our jobs, the jobs of labour and strength are the hardest to be hit by globalization and automation. And historically men have always been the workers, women the caregivers. Men are adrift not just because of feminism (feminism doesn't help, it's a self eating snake), but because technology and off shoring have made many useless in the current economy without retraining.

Now I work in a more technical field. I find that work that would have taken a few days several years ago, now takes a few hours because I use a robot to perform my task. Robots have cut my work-time on certain projects from days to hours. This pace of change is breath-taking. One day, maybe even I will be redundant. On the beach, with a cigar in one hand, a cheaply put together drink, torn up flip flops, and a robot doing my job may be order of the day.

There's going to be a lot more men adrift in the future, made redundant by being priced out by killer apps, cheaper made abroad, or by a circuit board at home.

The growth of reactionaries, the rise of hardcore nativist political parties, large rapid migration like the Africa to Europe exodus, and outright uprisings (ISIS) in the middle-east today are in many ways byproducts of redundant men responding to the rug beneath them being pulled out. Change that's happening so fast we can't even adapt within our lifespan.
(This post was last modified: 06-01-2015 12:41 PM by DjembaDjemba.)
06-01-2015 12:29 PM
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Post: #23
RE: Surprisingly Red Pill Comments on The Economist Article
There's wisdom in the Amish belief that God only wants us to have a certain level of technology (primitive), and 'knowledge is vanity'. sounds dumb, but when you realize the end game is most of our jobs become automated and its damage to society, maybe the Amish are right.

From here on out there might be permanent roving gangs of angry men (isis and whatnot) in various parts of the world, it will degrade into a free for all.

Perhaps man's arrogance and faith in science will be our downfall, as computers automate jobs and our lack of focus on families compounds dysfunction.
I couldn't help but think of Richard Bronson's space jet blowing up in the sky recently. Man thinks science can solve everything when it can't. Maybe God is laughing at our arrogance that we can create 'life' (computers) to change the rules of the game. Our computer-age socialist utopia is going to crash hard....man definitely has limits.
(This post was last modified: 06-03-2015 08:34 AM by Disco_Volante.)
06-03-2015 08:31 AM
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