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The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
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NYRangers2 Offline
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The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Since it seems there are a lot of questions about choosing a martial art/combat sport I figured a make a trade about recommendations, why I recommend them and what to avoid.

In know Particular order I recommend these martial arts.

Traditional Martial Arts:

Kyokushin- Kyokushin is a form of karate. But before you dismiss this martial art, this isn't your typical Kata based, air dancing, poses based martial art. This is legit karate, that is probably closer to Irish bare knuckle boxing than Shotokan. Kyokushin is unique as its a bareknuckle stand up fighting based martial art with a really strong focus on full contact sparring and fighting. Do to the martial arts rough style many Pro Kyokushins fighters compete in K-1 fights. Yes Kyokushin does have the belt system (though usually far less belts than TKD or Shotokan, in Japan only White, Grey, Brown and Black exist. Else were White, red, blue, yellow, green, brown and of course black exist. A few schools have more). My personal favorite aspect of Kyokushin is the fact it requires fighters to get close and to take hard punches and kicks from close range. It makes you tough.
The art has a strong focus on conditioning (pushups on knuckles, sit ups, bag work, taking hits to build up a pain tolerance).
Fights are in your face and look like this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7atKdsB5zjE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNBRlJPBuuM

If you are a late 90's/ early 2000s kid Kyokushin is the closest you will ever get to DBZ in real life. The only two drawbacks to Kyokushin are one: no face hitting is allowed. Two because its a bare knuckle its rare in the US. Its a rough martial art to get insurance coverage for and a few Dojos have been sued out of business.

McDojos Level: Low. McDojos tend to be rare for Kyokushin as the association (IKO) strongly encourages full contact sparring and tournaments, However, McDojos do exist. Most aren't the kind that charge you an arm and a leg for everything but are the type that only focus on Kata and forms. If the Kyokushin dojo doesn't offer any sparring or doesn't send any fighters to compete in IKO, USKK avoid them.

How to tell if the Dojo is legit: Ask if they are affiliated with the IKO or USKK (confirm affiliation on your own with either organization) and make sure sparring and fighting are the main enthisis of their dojo. Ask if they compete regularly in tournaments and kumites.

Plus: Full contact, bare knuckle fighting. Drawbacks: No face punches, no ground fighting, extremely rare in the US.

Sanshou/ Sanda

Sanda is basicly a form a Kung Fu that is very close to Kickboxing. In China its commonly thought along side Kung Fu but not so much here in the US. Protective gloves are worn, sometimes chest protectors and helmets sometimes no. Fights are very similar to Muay Tai, except Chinese.
Condition work should be apart of training (similar to kick boxing with some Kung Fu thrown in), fights are gloved but are full contact and look like this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNcyXmCOx_Y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meEdJ54RVfA

Like Kyokushin, Sanda/San Shou seems to be rare in the US with it only existing largely in Chinese neighborhoods (though there are exceptions). Many a times, Sanda is part of a Kung Fu school's curriculum a great Kung Fu school will late you train only in Sanda. Though its rare, its more common that Kyokushin.

McDojo level: Low, they exist. Mostly Kung Fu dojos that only occasionally offer Sanda and force you to do months (or years) of Kung Fu or you have to reach a certain level of Kung Fu before they let you do Sanda. If they don't let you do Sanda from the start, avoid it.

Muay Tai:
Muay Tai is a stand up kick boxing style martial art from Thailand. Its know for its hard punches, hard elbows bloody kicks and its clinching. Muay Thai requires hours of training and condition to be good but it will make you tough. Its bloody and has become an important part of MMA stand up in recent years.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEyw47vyEIk

McDojo Level: Not sure. The sport's popularity has grown a lot in the US over the last few years. I'm sure all Muay Thai McDojo's offer full contact (they have no choice) but some may be the kind of McDojo that charges you for everything.



Western Style Arts/Combat Sports

Boxing Boxing is probably my top choice for a combat sport. It me be old, doesn't contain a lot of fancy moves but its highly effective. It forces you to be tough and to be a man. It forces you to take punishment and dish it back out. Boxing is mean, rough and still the ultimate combat sport. Because of the contact, you develop fighting instincts Do to its sheer toughness and fighting instincts aside from MMA fighters, boxers still seem to do the best at defending themselves on the street.

McDojo Level: Medium. Since boxing is extremely popular, in recent years the rise of "Cardio boxing" and no contact style boxing GYMs that are geared toward Women and office workers. Make sure the GYM or club has a focus on full contact boxing. Avoid boxing programs offered by fitness centers or health clubs as these are mostly workout programs. Not necessarly a McDojo trait but boxing clubs can be the most expensive with many clubs charging $100 - $150 a month and many require a minimum three month initial contract to begin.

How to tell if it's legit: Check their Facebook page if they have one. If they have pictures of boxers sparring at their gym and participating in local Hotel and Casino fights they are legit. Ask to if they compete in local tournaments. For some reason in the US a lot of legit boxing gyms have a strong tie to a heritage or race. Example in the North East plenty of the best GYMs are the ones that call themselves an Irish gym or an Italian Gym or an Puerto Rican gym or a black gym. Something about fighting in the style of your heritage makes boxers train harder and tougher (again this only seems to apply to the Northeastern US, mainly the NYC, Philly and Boston areas).

Kick Boxing- boxing's leggy cousin. Real kickboxing like it's older cousin can be tough and in your face. Honestly I don't have much experience in following kick boxing and I don't know as much about. Real western is probably similar Muay Thai and Sanda (it evolved from Sanda).

McDojo Level: High. Sadly in recent years most kickboxing has become dominated by the health center, crossfit, workout culture. While real full kickboxing does still exist this cardio workout form aimed at twenty something year old girls trying to stay in shape. From what I've been told from my friend who does Muay Thai is that many of the girls who attend those classes are Ballet Dancers, Models and girls who care about their appearance to stay thin. So maybe if you do legit Kick Boxing or Muay Thai you can cross train at one of these places and game a bit?

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu- Do to its popularity in dominating UFC and other forms of MMA, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has probably become the most practiced martial art in the US behind TKD. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is rough and it humbles you. In the beginning you will be chocked out and tap out a lot but it makes you tough and determined.


McDojo Level: Low. It is impossible to teach BJJ without rolling and putting students into the ground fighting. However, there are BJJ dojos that charge ridiculous amounts of money (some as high as $300 a month). Its next to impossible to teach this art without actually sparring.

Look for the Gracie family Dojos, they have a reputation build up from winning BJJ tournaments and of course many of the early UFC fights in the 90s.

Arts to Avoid:
TaeKwonDo- In the early 20th century it was a very legit art. Sadly its been water down more than American lite beer. This day in age its only designed for fitness and olympic point fighting.

Shotokan- Much like TKD in the early to mid 20th Century, Shotokan was the form of karate to learn. Some legit Dojos still exist in America that offer full contact sparring but majority only focus on Katas. Lots and lots and lots and lots of Katas.

Dojos simply labeled Karate but don't say which style.

No sparring Kung Fu- Much like Shotokan many Kung Fu schools only focus on doing forms (tiger stance, wolf stance, crane stance, etc). If the Kung Fu school doesn't offer San Shou, Sanda or Lei Tai sparring avoid it.

Tai Chi: I don't believe Tai Chi was ever a real martial art. I believe it was simply a fitness program for old Chinese people.

If your an Australia avoid Yellow Bambo- Just youtube them, you will see why.

Judo- while a few legit Judo dojos exist most have cut out ground fighting. Most Judo dojos or nothing more than simply flips and throwing guys on the ground but unlike BJJ doesn't teach you to fight on the ground.

Hapkido- In Korea Hapkido is very similar to Kyokushin mixed with Judo. Full contact sparring is common, sometimes bare knuckle, sometimes with gloves. HOWEVER, the US most Hapkido is simply TKD labeled Hapkido.

AVOID ANY DOJO THAT DOES NOT OFFER FULL CONTACT SPARRING!
Oh yeah, if you are in college avoid your colleges martial art programs. Most offer no sparring or simply TDK Olympic style sparring. Most college Karate, Kung Fu and TDK are dominated by SJW, Feminists and Anime Nerds who don't want to put any work into becoming an effective fighter. Example:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOm6aF_xzb8

As for other martial arts such as Kempo, Krav Maga, Akido, Kendo, silat, Samboo, Wing Chun Kung Fu, Shaolin Kung Fu I have no experience with and I don't know anyone who does.


I personally have tried:

As a young kid:
Shotokan- hated it, nothing but poses and katas thought it was boring.

TKD- hated it, mostly poses and forms. Only the teenagers and adults sparred regularly. (and it was olympic point sparring).

Backyard Boxing- Fun but got in a lot of trouble.

As a teen:
Kyokushin- My personal favorite of all the traditional martial arts. Only did it for 9 months till my local Dojo was sued out of business. The Sensei/owner technically won the lawsuit but legal fees forced him to shut down and he never reopened. Its been 7 years.

As an adult: Traditional Boxing.

The others are all what friends of mine have tried.
(This post was last modified: 07-12-2015 10:32 PM by NYRangers2.)
07-12-2015 10:25 PM
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nek Offline
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
I don't know about Muay Tai, but for Muay Thai I'd say the McDojo level is rather low. And about the McDojo level of BJJ, there's definitely potential (RioNomad made a great comment about it in another thread). Long and short of it, if you're not training against another person, and if athleticism isn't used or is discouraged, it's a McDojo

Civilize the mind but make savage the body.
(This post was last modified: 07-12-2015 10:49 PM by nek.)
07-12-2015 10:48 PM
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JCIZZLE Offline
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
My gym is 250 a month but world class instruction. Top 10 Gym in the world arguably
07-12-2015 11:07 PM
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NYRangers2 Offline
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-12-2015 11:07 PM)JCIZZLE Wrote:  My gym is 250 a month but world class instruction. Top 10 Gym in the world arguably

If you are getting excellent instruction/coaching and your gym is expensive that's fine. The average here in $150 for boxing, kick boxing and Muay Thai gyms. Kyokushin was $60 a month and Sanda is $100.

It wouldn't surprise me if a lot of the top level gyms like Gleason's (I have no idea how much they charge) charge close to or over $300.
07-12-2015 11:38 PM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-12-2015 10:48 PM)nek Wrote:  I don't know about Muay Tai, but for Muay Thai I'd say the McDojo level is rather low. And about the McDojo level of BJJ, there's definitely potential (RioNomad made a great comment about it in another thread). Long and short of it, if you're not training against another person, and if athleticism isn't used or is discouraged, it's a McDojo

I would assume Muay Tai's McDojo level is low. There is only one in my county and they compete in kick boxing tournaments. As BJJ there are three in my town, one is a Gracie dojo that only charges $150 a month, the other is a no GI Dojo that charges $300. He might be the closest thing to a McDojo that I know off for BJJ. My friend went to the free trail said it seemed legit just expensive, so he went to Gracie instead.
07-12-2015 11:45 PM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Yeah I forgot to mention it was a BJJ only gym. I think the best bet to check if your gym is a mcdojo or not is to see how well the athletes place in IBJJF or checking on reddit or sherdog.
07-12-2015 11:53 PM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
It seems like if you want to protect yourself, wrestling would be the best MMA to learn. I was watching a video on liveleak the other day where this guy robbed a store and this kid 70 lbs lighter than him went for his legs, took him down, and laid on top of him until the cops got there.
07-13-2015 12:02 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-13-2015 12:02 AM)LINUX Wrote:  It seems like if you want to protect yourself, wrestling would be the best MMA to learn. I was watching a video on liveleak the other day where this guy robbed a store and this kid 70 lbs lighter than him went for his legs, took him down, and laid on top of him until the cops got there.

Wrestling is great, but it is mostly taught in schools. If you want to learn to wrestle outside of high school your best bet is to learn BJJ/submission wrestling at a BJJ/MMA gym.

Good list to the OP. I'll say it again. The BEST martial art to learn is the one you like enough to train 3/4 days per week consistently. Otherwise you will never get good enough to use it anyway, regardless of what you trained.

Boxing, Muay Thai, BJJ (hopefully with some takedowns), submission grappling, wrestling, sambo, Judo, Kyokshin, Sanshou/Sanda are all legit.

Find a good gym that you like, and train 3-4 days per week, and you're on the right path.
07-13-2015 12:11 AM
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samsamsam Offline
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
I have been focused on boxing. My gym is 5 bucks a round for mitts. No classes of any sort.

If I ever get into a confrontation, I have been told the one thing to worry about is those who try to tackle,wrestle, to get you on the ground. I have heard of sprawling as technique to defend. Does this video fairly present some useful techniques?





I just don't have time to learn another style of self defense when I have not even figured out the first one. Thanks.

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07-13-2015 12:23 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-13-2015 12:23 AM)samsamsam Wrote:  I have been focused on boxing. My gym is 5 bucks a round for mitts. No classes of any sort.

If I ever get into a confrontation, I have been told the one thing to worry about is those who try to tackle,wrestle, to get you on the ground. I have heard of sprawling as technique to defend. Does this video fairly present some useful techniques?





I just don't have time to learn another style of self defense when I have not even figured out the first one. Thanks.

Learn to Sprawl, learn the importance of underhooks and do a bit of pummelling, get an uppercut in if he comes in like the video or a knee if he shoots in at a lower level and you'll be fine against most guys.
07-13-2015 12:49 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Is pummeling the elbowing and pounding he was doing in the video?

I'd always hope that I could get a shot on the head before he got too close.

That guillotine move seems like you could kill someone with that.

Still not going to trade with you - but appreciate the infoBig Grin

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(This post was last modified: 07-13-2015 12:54 AM by samsamsam.)
07-13-2015 12:53 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Another huge part of self defense is getting bigger and stronger. A 150 boxer/wrestler/bjj guy/etc. will still have a very tough time in a fight against a strong 200lb guy. Also the bigger/stronger you look, the less likely people are to test you.

I just a video of two high school kids fighting. One was a tiny guy, but an obvious boxer. He came in with a hook to the body, hook to the head, and short right to the head. Problem is he got way too close to the bigger guy with the hooks and the guy just picked him up and slammed him on the tile floor. Done deal.
07-13-2015 01:09 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
RioNomad is on the money, as usual. The point about doing something you enjoy is an excellent piece of advice. The best art absolutely is the one you will train.

A combination of effective striking and being big and strong goes a hell of a long way for self defense. Sprawling and the like could certainly be useful, but you do have to let the guy get close and rely on having the technique to do it. If you are big and strong, with an excellent grip (perhaps the most significant aspect of strength for self-defense), it is less risky to get a firm grip of their collar and hold them at arms length. It also acts as a form of defense against punches, as it is quite hard to land straight punches to the head when someone has their arms fully extended, and it's almost impossible if they have a grip of you (same for the body here too).

@Samsamsam - I'd caution against trying to uppercut someone coming in with their head down in a real situation. Without gloves, the uppercut offers a poor return on investment, and should only be done as a very short range elbow strike, in my opinion. Better (assuming you have to throw something), to use a pivot hook, as it puts you outside the line of his body, offers you more to aim at, and is likely to leave him off balance and unable to grapple effectively. The uppercut without gloves on a target moving in is likely to leave you with broken hands IMO.
07-13-2015 05:15 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
I can't take a thread seriously, that describes BJJ as being mcdojo immune.

Those guys have mastered the art of mass commerciality nearly as well as TKD/Krav.

I fucking hate the term mcdojo anyway. Like there's something wrong with giving the consumer exactly what they want?

Let's be clear on one thing...there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a commercial aspect to a martial arts gym. It pays the bills and gets people through the door; plus, the cream usually rises to the top anyway.

The biggest "mcdojo" haters are usually either trainers that cannot compete in a commercial world or internet idiots that think you can run a fully kitted out martial arts centre with a fight team full of penniless kids and the few other guys that want spit and sawdust.
07-13-2015 08:44 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Frankly, my go to move in a street fight is to take out the eyes. It requires 4 pounds of pressure to rip out a human eyeball from the inside near the tear duct outward. Many amateurs don't account for this when shooting in. Secondly, I haven't seen many men continue to fight with a crushed windpipe. Where the trachea is first vulnerable directly above the sternum you can punch or use both thumbs to push the front of the trachea to the back of the spine. Third, if you have the presence of mind to elbow or use the knot on the outside blade of your forearm to attack the spine you can severely injure your opponent by damaging the C1 through C8 spinal vertebrae. A neck crank or choke with an elbow to the region will work, as well as the blade of the forearm as long as your opponent isn't so fat their neck is protected by blubber.
07-13-2015 08:50 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-13-2015 08:44 AM)CrashBangWallop Wrote:  I can't take a thread seriously, that describes BJJ as being mcdojo immune.

Those guys have mastered the art of mass commerciality nearly as well as TKD/Krav.

I fucking hate the term mcdojo anyway. Like there's something wrong with giving the consumer exactly what they want?

Let's be clear on one thing...there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a commercial aspect to a martial arts gym. It pays the bills and gets people through the door; plus, the cream usually rises to the top anyway.

The biggest "mcdojo" haters are usually either trainers that cannot compete in a commercial world or internet idiots that think you can run a fully kitted out martial arts centre with a fight team full of penniless kids and the few other guys that want spit and sawdust.

My problem with "mcdojos" is not the fact that they are commercial (traditional boxing is commercial as hell) is the fact that they don't offer any contact sparring. For most of the TMA in this day in age most of the Dojos only offer katas and form practice but never any contact (for BS reasons because it might hurt).
(This post was last modified: 07-13-2015 10:05 AM by NYRangers2.)
07-13-2015 10:04 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
It's all about what you want, and that you're aware of what you're doing.

A lot of mcdojo stuff is posture martial arts, it's all about looking good and exercise.

Then there's sport martial arts, where sparring and competitions are the focus. This is were you learn the basics of fighting, however, it's Tough Guy fighting, in that you're trying to look good while still being semi effective at taking the person out. But you still follow the Tough Guy Rules.

Real fighting is just taking the person out as quickly as possible. Outside of professions that require these abilities, no one is going to teach you much real fighting. Eye gouging, throats, pressure points, digit manipulation, etc.

I started out sport fighting and maneuvered into real fighting just because of personal/professional circumstances. Sport fighting is a great basis, but you still need muscle/flexibility/stamina and a lot of mental awareness and flexibility to handle real shit.

Just know what you're trying to accomplish when you start training. Sometimes I'm training specific punches/kicks/elbows etc, so I'll do sets of 50 of an overhand right for example, then switch feet and do 50 of an overhand left. Then 50 lead hand - follow hand straights, switching the feet after another.

Or I'll train power and endurance. I like Tabata style sets, so 20 seconds on full speed punches, 10 second rest, switch feet and repeat. Same things with kicks.

Or I'll just fuck around and try something new, like one of my new techniques is working on power punches that start in the same place, either hand, and are telegraphed (but no hand pullback). I telegraph them because I want the person to react, because I can still stop the punch and throw a kick where ever if they pull the hands up. Useful in a real fight, but you'll only get it one or two to work in a sport fight.

Plus, hit dummies bare fisted (and occasionally heavy bags). This teaches a lot about actual fist placement, and you should work on chin and head rotation, since it's the twisting of the brainstem that cause lights out (and Parkinson's), not hitting the top of someone's skull, which just breaks your hand. Hitting bare fisted on bags helps toughen up your hands and wrist stability so you don't snap them first thing in a real fight. Your hands will be quite painful for awhile as your bones adjust to this at first. And don't be a dick and bleed all over the bags, wrap them or come back later.
(This post was last modified: 07-13-2015 11:52 AM by JacksonRev.)
07-13-2015 11:51 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-13-2015 10:04 AM)NYRangers2 Wrote:  
(07-13-2015 08:44 AM)CrashBangWallop Wrote:  I can't take a thread seriously, that describes BJJ as being mcdojo immune.

Those guys have mastered the art of mass commerciality nearly as well as TKD/Krav.

I fucking hate the term mcdojo anyway. Like there's something wrong with giving the consumer exactly what they want?

Let's be clear on one thing...there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a commercial aspect to a martial arts gym. It pays the bills and gets people through the door; plus, the cream usually rises to the top anyway.

The biggest "mcdojo" haters are usually either trainers that cannot compete in a commercial world or internet idiots that think you can run a fully kitted out martial arts centre with a fight team full of penniless kids and the few other guys that want spit and sawdust.

My problem with "mcdojos" is not the fact that they are commercial (traditional boxing is commercial as hell) is the fact that they don't offer any contact sparring. For most of the TMA in this day in age most of the Dojos only offer katas and form practice but never any contact (for BS reasons because it might hurt).

The actual reason they don't do regular sparring work is purely commercial.

Less than 5% of people who enrol in martial arts classes ever participate in sparring; even less compete.

So what's the point, from a financial point of view? You'll find that most of these schools will put on regular sparring classes (maybe a course at the weekend once per month or something) but won't shout from the hills about it because it's not in their interests, aside from the sales of safety kit, to have their students sparring.

Do you know why? Because a lot of the people that give it a go will stop training the first time they get hit in the face or realise they are rubbish.

It can cost upwards of $150 to acquire a new student in this business...and it's much easier to keep them once enrolled than get a new one.

People can't seem to grasp the fact that these schools are businesses, first and foremost. They are not ninja training camps. If sparring and fighting were profitable, they'd be on it like a shot.


I find American TMA schools ridiculous but you have to see where they are coming from. Nobody is forced to enrol at them...but many do. Many, many more than ever enrol at any kind of fight gym. Full stop.
07-13-2015 01:35 PM
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Saweeep Offline
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Post: #19
RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
P.S. Kickboxing did most definitely not originate from San Da.

It's origins are absolutely 100% known, unlike most MAs.

Google PKA Full contact karate (the origins are in the name) for more info.
07-13-2015 01:40 PM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Actually, so much of this OP is utter rubbish I can't even be bothered to pull it to bits.
07-13-2015 01:41 PM
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Post: #21
RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
I used to grapple but I tore my acl went back but I want to do some striking.
I am looking at muay thai and boxing. Any one here a righthanded southpaw?
07-13-2015 01:59 PM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-13-2015 12:02 AM)LINUX Wrote:  It seems like if you want to protect yourself, wrestling would be the best MMA to learn. I was watching a video on liveleak the other day where this guy robbed a store and this kid 70 lbs lighter than him went for his legs, took him down, and laid on top of him until the cops got there.

I was on the wrestling team in high school. It's a good sport and you will know what to do if somebody grabs you. However, pinning your opponents shoulders to the ground isn't a very useful end game for self defense. Learning the BJJ submission holds would be a nice complement.

Rico... Sauve....
07-13-2015 02:11 PM
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samsamsam Offline
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
Anyone recommend a good place in Los Angeles to learn some sprawl and defensive techniques? I know I need to stay focused on boxing. But this thread has got me thinkng that learning a couple of things could be very useful. I'm looking for a serious gym but one that has a chill attitude if possible. Thanks.

Fate whispers to the warrior, "You cannot withstand the storm." And the warrior whispers back, "I am the storm."

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07-14-2015 01:10 AM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
(07-14-2015 01:10 AM)samsamsam Wrote:  Anyone recommend a good place in Los Angeles to learn some sprawl and defensive techniques? I know I need to stay focused on boxing. But this thread has got me thinkng that learning a couple of things could be very useful. I'm looking for a serious gym but one that has a chill attitude if possible. Thanks.

I wouldn't worry about it. It takes a lot of time and dedication to learn to sprawl and basic wrestling. I'd just focus on your boxing and become good at that, and then go to a MMA/Nogi gym if you really want to learn some basic wrestling and grappling.

You can't just "learn a couple things" and be able to execute them. You'll need to practice them several times a week for an extended period of time, so that's why I'd say you are best off just working on your boxing for the time being.
07-14-2015 06:39 PM
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RE: The Ultimate Martial Arts/Combat Sports/Boxing Thread
I think I may have brought this one up already:



"We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately."
07-15-2015 01:39 PM
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