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R.I.P. London
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rudebwoy Away
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Post: #201
RE: R.I.P. London
(02-16-2016 05:28 PM)tynamite Wrote:  The British government has empty council properties and supported accommodation all the time. It's a shame all the immigrants are stealing it from the people who need it the most.

This is a lie and you know it, stop with the nonsense propoganda.

You know full well that the majority of people on welfare are white british, some of them have been on the "dole" for generations.

Look no further than the daily mail newspaper which highlights these extreme cases of couples with ten kids collecting big paycheques every month.

Immigrants have made that country what it is today, whether it be Asians, West Indians, Antipodeans, Polish or whoever. The majority of them have come to the UK for a better life and worked their socks off.

I was living there a few years back, people were complaining about the Poles and the people from Eastern Europe flooding the place. But you know full well, that the polish work hard. Most immigrants work hard and do jobs that the locals won't do, like driving the buses and sweeping the roads.

When my parents moved to the UK, they had to work. They were not entitled to welfare or council flats, my dad even worked half day on Saturday. When they bought their first home, the government was giving out grants (free money) to first time buyers. They did not take advantage of this because they had enough saved.

I lived in the UK for 17 years, so pull the other leg mate.

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02-16-2016 11:19 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-16-2016 05:28 PM)tynamite Wrote:  It's a shame all the immigrants are stealing it from the people who need it the most.
Gonna have to concur with Rudeboy here. While I agree that a lot of immigrants are definitely riding the welfare boat, you would have to be incredibly biased and maybe even xenophobic to not acknowledge that the British White low class are doing the same. I mean you have welfare plans that give more money than minimum wage full time work, combine that with a lazy disposition and a lack of pride and it's no wonder we're getting many individuals who simply opt out of working and shit out children (who are brought up on those exact values).

Immigration is a problem in the UK, but it's not the only problem and definitely not the main cause of it's degradation. The true cause is that our culture encourages lazy people to be lazy, the entitled to be entitled, and immigrants simply want a piece of that cake. And who can blame them? Do you think the jobless 200lb woman with 5 kids from multiple father's deserves your taxes more than a Polish woman who speaks fluent English, has 2 kids and is happily married?

Now if you were to have the Migrants that are entering Germany and Sweden etc, THEN you'd have something to talk about. And even moreso if the ruling political party was dealing with it in the same way as Germany. Instead of having Poles/Indians potentially living off benefits but still using our language and generally keeping to themselves, getting practically free housing but at least respecting the property and the neighbourhood, you would get well, just read the Migrant Crisis thread. People are not getting evicted from housing (yet). Gyms are not closing to house anyone (yet). Mass sexual assaults are not happening (yet) . We still have the English Channel preventing that, but when that's not longer a barrier you will see the immigrants that share our "Western values" are more valuable to us than a lot of our home-grown chavs, scallies etc.
(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016 12:44 AM by AntiMediocrity.)
02-17-2016 12:43 AM
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Post: #203
RE: R.I.P. London
(02-17-2016 12:43 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  
(02-16-2016 05:28 PM)tynamite Wrote:  It's a shame all the immigrants are stealing it from the people who need it the most.
While I agree that a lot of immigrants are definitely riding the welfare boat, you would have to be incredibly biased and maybe even xenophobic to not acknowledge that the British White low class are doing the same.

How dare the people who have lived there for thousands of years try to be successful in their own country! Those xenophobes!

No such thing as a xenophobe. In normal times we call the patriots.

Quote:So as you can see, it is a little more complicated than blaming the immigrants.

Yes, it's called being betrayed by the ruling class.

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02-17-2016 07:03 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
Quote:You know full well that the majority of people on welfare are white british, some of them have been on the "dole" for generations.

White British are also ~85% of the population of the UK. The relevant question is whether there are over- or underrepresented among welfare recepients.
The claim that 'the majority of people on welfare are white british' is meaningless in this conversation and is pure intellectual hypocrisy (to put it mildly).

Are immigrants overrepresented? Are certain groups of immigrants overrepresented (the answer is clearly 'yes' for at least 2 such groups)? Why not stop importing them then?

Quote:Immigrants have made that country what it is today, whether it be Asians, West Indians, Antipodeans, Polish or whoever
Jeez, I thought that the topic was about how natives didn't like what the country is today. But immigrants have made it what it is and that's somehow relevant to and in support of the opposite point to the one discussed here.

Quote:Most immigrants work hard and do jobs that the locals won't do, like driving the buses and sweeping the roads.
Jeez, and maybe if the immigrants weren't there, these jobs would have paid more (supply and demand...) and more locals will be willing to do them? Talking about needing immigrants for jobs in a country with labor force participation rate <70% is not the brightest argument.

Quote:the British White low class are doing the same.
Oh, snap, we have our own welfare moochers so, please, let's import some more. In fact, let's import groups of people with proven track record of being worse welfare abusers and more likely to be criminals and terrorists.
02-17-2016 08:13 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-17-2016 07:03 AM)Samseau Wrote:  How dare the people who have lived there for thousands of years try to be successful in their own country! Those xenophobes!
Samseau I'm disappointed to see this response, maybe you didn't read my post properly? You talk about people being successful, pray tell how is "success" defined as:

-Sitting on your ass watching TV, playing video games etc all day
-Being unemployed by choice
-Eating yourself into obesity
-Rearing up children to be delinquents
-Not expanding your knowledge on useful things
-Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol

List goes on.

I know by your posts that these are contrary to your lifestyle, so you've definitely misinterpreted my post. If however you still consider individuals who engage in the above to have more right to live in Britain than a hard working, married adult who speaks English fluently and is teaching their children western values as well as English simply because they're still a foreigner, than I can't help but question your integrity. You have my respect regarding your posts in the Migrant Crisis thread, but this is something we definitely won't agree on.

Quote:Oh, snap, we have our own welfare moochers so, please, let's import some more. In fact, let's import groups of people with proven track record of being worse welfare abusers and more likely to be criminals and terrorists.

Straw man. I didn't say anything about bringing in more migrants, only that you shouldn't point fingers at Poles and Indians when many of them could be even more hard working than that chav which lives across the street. And you write; "more likely to be criminals and terrorists". Apparently you too didn't read my post properly. I will re-iterate:

me Wrote:Now if you were to have the Migrants that are entering Germany and Sweden etc, THEN you'd have something to talk about.

I specifically acknowledge that migrants coming from ME countries are a problem, most likely the "criminals and terrorists" you refer to. But they are not hard working Indians and Poles, you can't conflate them together simply because they're not British born.
(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016 01:26 PM by AntiMediocrity.)
02-17-2016 12:36 PM
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Post: #206
RE: R.I.P. London
^ Be careful with the video game comment, you might get a warning.

Don't waste your breath arguing with guys who haven't left their country.

He should be more concerned with his own country and it's problems, before criticizing other countries.

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02-17-2016 01:29 PM
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rudebwoy Away
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RE: R.I.P. London
Quote:Most immigrants work hard and do jobs that the locals won't do, like driving the buses and sweeping the roads.
Jeez, and maybe if the immigrants weren't there, these jobs would have paid more (supply and demand...) and more locals will be willing to do them? Talking about needing immigrants for jobs in a country with labor force participation rate <70% is not the brightest argument.

[quote]


The supply and demand excuse is a good one, there is a supply of jobs but the demand to fill those jobs has always been low in the UK.
That is why immigrants from all over the world can move to the UK and find work right away. The local population isn't qualified or interested in working certain jobs.

I have left the UK for a few years, I still get jobs sent to me on a monthly basis by recruiters.

I would love to hear your experiences in the time you spent in the UK, assuming you have actually been there.

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02-17-2016 01:41 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
Quote:Samseau I'm disappointed to see this response, maybe you didn't read my post properly? You talk about people being successful, pray tell how is "success" defined as:

-Sitting on your ass watching TV, playing video games etc all day
-Being unemployed by choice
-Eating yourself into obesity
-Rearing up children to be delinquents
-Not expanding your knowledge on useful things
-Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol

This is a flaw with the welfare system itself, not necessarily the people who exploit it. Welfare can be used to promote eugenics or dysgenics, but most politicians prefer the dysgenic solutions since having a voter base elect you for generations so you can keep providing free shit is better than doing the right thing and perhaps only holding office for one cycle.

You gotta understand, the entire system is broken from the top to bottom which promotes such a lazy degenerate lifestyle. The schools suck balls, the lack of good paying jobs due to labor costs falling due to high immigration, the extreme taxation for anyone who does manage to achieve success means that tens of millions of people will never feel like trying in the first place. Welfare becomes more attractive.

Immigration that only lets in the highly qualified is a good thing and I would never object to it. But immigration that focuses on bringing in masses that swell the welfare ranks just so corporations can have some extra slave labor to serve them catered food at lunch break for $8 an hour has no place in any society.

You seem to live in the fantasy that most immigrants coming into Britain and Europe are of the high quality type, when in fact the opposite is true. Statistics reveal that most non-White immigrant classes across the USA and Europe disproportionately consume welfare relative to their White peers. Again, it could all be stopped with a reform of the welfare and immigration system, but the rich elites don't want that.

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(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016 04:37 PM by Samseau.)
02-17-2016 04:37 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
[/quote]

You seem to live in the fantasy that most immigrants coming into Britain and Europe are of the high quality type, when in fact the opposite is true. Statistics reveal that most non-White immigrant classes across the USA and Europe disproportionately consume welfare relative to their White peers. Again, it could all be stopped with a reform of the welfare and immigration system, but the rich elites don't want that.
[/quote]

Your the one living in the fantasy, what video game you playing today.

Please show me these statistics?

I am one of those non-white immigrants you speak of and I live very well, most of us aren't on welfare. I refer to Canada and the UK, two countries I am very familiar with.

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02-17-2016 05:01 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-16-2016 11:19 PM)rudebwoy Wrote:  I was living there a few years back, people were complaining about the Poles and the people from Eastern Europe flooding the place. But you know full well, that the polish work hard. Most immigrants work hard and do jobs that the locals won't do, like driving the buses and sweeping the roads.

I lived in the UK in the early 2000s. I was talking with a standard issue white Englishman who owned a trucking company, and he said that he would always choose a Pole over a native white Englishman. He said he would rather have someone who worked hard for him than someone who still thought he was a master of the high seas and the bounding main and sat on his arse all day.

This was right about the time that the word "Chav" came into being.

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(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016 05:11 PM by debeguiled.)
02-17-2016 05:10 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
The question remains why any country should even consider paying welfare to foreigners. If they haven't worked in the country for at least 10 years straight without support, then they should just have to go back.
But I guess people here know by now that I don't even like qualified immigration. At least not in those numbers and not if it means granting everyone citizenship. European countries are very well able to fill their marked demands with their own people. If supply is really lagging or the quality is lagging, that's a cultural problem and one of the educational system. Nothing that couldn't be fixed inside the country if a fix was really wanted.
02-17-2016 06:20 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
Quote:
Quote:You seem to live in the fantasy that most immigrants coming into Britain and Europe are of the high quality type, when in fact the opposite is true. Statistics reveal that most non-White immigrant classes across the USA and Europe disproportionately consume welfare relative to their White peers. Again, it could all be stopped with a reform of the welfare and immigration system, but the rich elites don't want that.

Your the one living in the fantasy, what video game you playing today.

Please show me these statistics?

I am one of those non-white immigrants you speak of and I live very well, most of us aren't on welfare. I refer to Canada and the UK, two countries I am very familiar with.





Quote:Non-EU immigration linked to unemployment, says report
Research by migration advisory committee suggests link between immigration and employment levels of 'native workers'

[Image: East-European-workers-pic-007.jpg?w=620&...654b5148d8]

The new research challenges the established academic consensus that there has been little or no direct link between immigration and employment levels in Britain.

Immigration to Britain from outside Europe is linked to unemployment in depressed economic times, according to an explosive report from the government's own expert advisers.

The migration advisory committee research published on Tuesday suggests that for every extra 100 non-European migrants who come to Britain, 23 fewer British residents are employed.

The finding directly challenges the established academic consensus that there has been little or no direct link between immigration and employment levels in Britain. It flatly contradicts research from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research published on Monday, which found that even in the recent recession there was no direct impact.

The official research confirms that migration has had no impact on average wages but says that it has increased wages at the top of the wage scale but has lowered wage rates at the bottom.

It says that its conclusion that an increase of 100 additional non-EU migrants may be associated with a reduction in employment of 23 "native workers" is based on an analysis of migration and employment rates over the period 1975 to 2010.

"But this possible displacement should not be assumed to last forever: those migrants who have been in the UK for over five years are not associated with displacement of British-born workers," it adds.

The report from the Home Office-appointed migration advisory committee, however, makes clear that there has been no increase in violent crime levels as a result of recent migration, and the influx of foreign skilled workers may actually have contributed to falling crime levels as they are less likely to commit burglary and other property crime.

In terms of housing, the report estimates that skilled migration from outside Europe will generate demand for an extra 112,000 homes by 2017 – only about 8% of the additional demand for housing within the next five years with – with the effects concentrated in London and other limited parts of Britain.

The report also says recent official assessments of immigration policy that have calculated the cost to the economy of measures such as curbing overseas students should instead measure their impact on the "economic wellbeing" of the resident population rather than their impact on the gross domestic product.

Professor David Metcalf, the chairman of the migration advisory committee, said: "Assessing the impacts of migration is not a simple decision and our conclusions will require careful consideration by the government. However, our research suggests that non-European migration is associated with some displacement of British workers."

Metcalf says 160,000 British-born workers have been displaced by non-EU migrants since 2005. But he added that there was no evidence that European immigration, including Polish, had led to fewer British workers being employed.

The report was commissioned by ministers after a Home Office impact assessment put the cost to the economy of the government's curbs on overseas students at more than £2bn a year.
http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/jan/1...employment

Quote:Migrants DO take our jobs: Britons losing out to foreign workers, says official study

BRITONS are losing out to foreign workers with one in six low-skilled jobs now held by an immigrant.

[Image: immigration08july14-487645.jpg]

Of the UK's 13million low-skilled jobs, 2.1million are held by migrant workers [GETTY]

The number of British-born people in lowly-paid jobs has fallen by more than a million since 1997 – while migrants doing similar work rose by the same amount, official figures show.

A Home Office study published yesterday showed the jobs boom for migrants was fuelled by expansion of the European Union in 2004.

More than half of the new job-holders in ­Britain are eastern Europeans using freedom of movement rules to seek out better wages.

Of the UK’s 13 million low-skilled jobs, in areas such as horticulture and food manufacturing, about 2.1 million are now held by migrants, the report found. Nearly half of them, 840,000, are EU citizens.

Advisers on the Home Office’s Migration Advisory Committee who produced the research have now urged the Government to limit the impact of migration on local communities. And they warned ministers to “think carefully” about how they handle more EU expansion.

Ukip MEP Patrick O’Flynn said: “These figures demonstrate the damaging impact that mass immigration has had on the prospects of ordinary Brits.


These figures demonstrate the damaging impact that mass immigration has had on the prospects of ordinary Brits
Ukip MEP Patrick O’Flynn
“The low-skilled jobs market is now saturated by foreign workers, while communities have had to bear the brunt of this influx that has changed many neighbourhoods beyond recognition.

“We must leave the EU and take back control of Britain’s borders.”

The report said the rise in immigration over the past 15 to 20 years was “heavily influenced” by Labour’s policy of dishing out more work permits, student and family visas.

It found that 75 per cent of the 2.9 million rise in the foreign-born population in the past 10 years was concentrated in just a quarter of towns, leaving them struggling to cope with the pressure on housing and services.

“Although nationally the economic impact of immigration is very modest, the economic and social impact on particular local authorities is much stronger,” the report said.

It states that between 1997 and 2013 the number of Britons in low-skilled jobs fell by 1.1 million, while the number of foreigners in such roles increased by the same amount.

The UK-born share of low-skilled jobs fell from 93 per cent to 84 per cent.

Some experts say a shift by two million Britons into high-skilled work explains this change. But the UK-born share of top-level jobs also fell six per cent to 86 per cent.

The committee raised concerns that migrants from five countries, including Turkey, that are currently negotiating to join the EU would once again find work in low-skilled occupations.

Sir Andrew Green, of Migration Watch UK, said: “One has to ask why some people are so keen to promote mass immigration in the teeth of public opinion.”

A Home Office spokesman said: “In the past, the majority of growth in employment was taken up by foreign nationals. Under this Government, three-quarters of this growth has been accounted for by British citizens.

“We are working across ­Government to ensure immigration works for this country and will use the findings of this report to inform our approach.”
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/487645/...cial-study

Quote:British bosses snub 2.7m jobless to offer work to Romanians

BRITSH bosses are offering thousands of jobs to Romanian workers despite UK unemployment hitting a 17-year high of 2.68million.

[Image: 299091_1.jpg]

As the jobless rate soars to 8.4 per cent, Romanian job-seekers are being snapped up in a recruitment drive that has made the UK the favoured destination for the would-be migrant workers.

In Bucharest yesterday, online recruitment agency tjobs.ro said British firms were trying to fill 2,434 jobs with Romanian workers.

Many posts were for medical staff, tourism workers and skilled staff, but a quarter of them were for labourers and other unskilled workers.

The jobs are just the latest being offered to out-of-work foreigners while their British counterparts are left dependent on the benefits system.

UK posts on offer in Romania included £2,000-a-month cab drivers, nurses on £24,000 a year and doctors offered £4,000 a month. Other jobs included sales staff, care-home assistants and hotel posts. In December alone there were 9,383 applications from Romanians for UK jobs through tjobs.ro.

Many posts were for medical staff, tourism workers and skilled staff, but a quarter of them were for labourers and other unskilled workers.
This made up more than 20 per cent of the total applications. Germany came next, with 6,890 Romanian applications, followed by Denmark with 4,199.

Earlier this month, a report revealed immigrants had taken 160,000 jobs from British-born workers in five years.

One British job was lost for every four non-EU workers arriving here between 2005 and 2010.

The study by the Government’s Migration Advisory Committee revealed the number of foreigners working in the UK had soared by 2.1 million in 15 years. Cheap labour was one of the biggest problems. The startling findings come as youth unemployment in Britain crashes through the one million barrier.

They vindicate warnings the Daily Express has sounded for years on the dangers of the last Labour government’s open-door policy on immigration.

The report makes a mockery of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s pledge to create “British jobs for British workers”.

Sir Andrew Green, chairman of campaign group MigrationWatch UK, said: “The committee have had the courage to say straight out that immigration can add to unemployment, especially during a recession.”

Romanian nurse Sylvia Basescu, who is looking for a job here, said: “Many of my friends have jobs in the UK. They earn great salaries. There is lots of overtime and they can save a lot of money to buy property in Romania and send money back to support their families.”
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/299091/...-Romanians

Quote:Romanians rush for 'Come to UK' jobs

TENS of thousands of Romanians plan to swarm into the UK once visa restrictions are dropped at the end of the year, new figures suggest.

[Image: gypos-440456.jpg]

There are lots of Romanian gypsies living rough in London.

One in three jobs currently advertised with the country’s leading recruiter – 28,577 out of 87,786 – is based in Britain.

The shocking figures provoked concern among campaigners fearing a flood of Romanians and Bulgarians next year when the UK’s labour market and job centres are opened to them.

Experts at Migration Watch believe around 50,000 a year will arrive for the next five years.

Peter Bone, Tory MP for Wellingborough – which already has a huge eastern European population – said: “This is a catastrophe about to happen and we need to stop it. Not only will Britons lose out on work but it will create social tensions.”

[Image: 92438.jpg]

Migration Watch experts believe 250,000 Romanians will arrive in the UK over the next five years.

Not only will Britons lose out on work but it will create social tensions. East Midlands Euro MP Derek Clark of Ukip said: “All of this is on top of the migrants we already have from Romania and Bulgaria, many of whom are living rough on the streets of London and elsewhere.”

Most of the jobs advertised are for skilled staff in healthcare, tourism, agriculture and childcare. But there are adverts for jobs unskilled Britons could do including taxi drivers, trainee managers for a burger chain and care assistants.

Romanians can earn higher wages in this country compared to other EU states, and also get access to Britain’s welfare state and social housing system.

[Image: 92439.jpg]

Romanians will be able to earn more in the UK than in other EU states.

Yesterday in Bucharest, the Romanian capital, locals told how they are already planning to journey to Britain in 2014.

Plumber Munteanu Dumitru, 32, said: “My girlfriend and I have been told there are lots of jobs. Once work restrictions are lifted we hope to go to the UK and make a new life.”

Nurse Gabriela Teodorescu said: “I have seen adverts for jobs in the UK and the pay and conditions are so much better. I think England is a better place to settle and have my family.”
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/440456/...to-UK-jobs

Quote:Migrants mopping up UK jobs?
As spending cuts in the UK force a growing number of people out of work, the few vacancies that are left are mostly going to immigrants.

Jamie Bragginton is among the growing ranks of the unemployed. He has been trying to find a job in social housing since May – but competition is fierce.

"There are around five or six agencies working for each job so you just find there are about 30-40 people getting shortlisted. I’ve had to look at salaries that are slightly less, maybe going back to college, maybe doing something part-time," he says.

Unemployment is now at 8 per cent – the highest for 15 years. But no matter how hard Jamie tries, the odds are stacked against him.

Job centers across the UK have helped fill over 180,000 new vacancies in the last 12 months. But only 8 per cent of those went to British nationals. Foreign workers were more successful in the job market nine times out of 10.

Reversing that trend was a key election pledge of the new government, promising to slash immigration.

However a year on, it has only increased. Net immigration was nearly a quarter of a million last year – up 20 per cent on 2009 and Britain’s second biggest ever annual total. It is way off the government’s five-figure target.

“I think they were probably over-promising. Given the restrictions that they face, it didn’t make sense to promise to bring the number down to an arbitrary level. Really, they should’ve been having a more honest debate with the public about the limits on what they could do,” claims Alex Glennie from the Institute for Public Policy Research.

The government claims its target can be met by capping non-EU immigration. But that ignores the fact that most are coming from within the EU where restrictions do not apply.

Entry numbers for Eastern Europeans rose eightfold in the last year alone as the incomers continued to take advantage of the open borders.

“It’s unlikely the measures they’ve announced will meet that target. They might come close, but they are unlikely to meet it, so we think further measures are necessary,” claims Matt Pollard from Migration Watch.

Others believe that the problem lies at home.

Priti Patel is a Conservative MP and from an immigrant family herself. She knows what it takes to succeed here – but says most do not.

“30-40 years ago, you’ve seen immigrants come to this country. What they want to do is, they want to work hard and get on in life. They really do – they’ve got families to think about, etc, etc. In days gone past, we used to have a tremendous British work ethic in this country and I think we’ve effectively lost some of that,” she says.

As RT’s Ivor Bennett reports, most people at the job centers are migrant workers.

“The problem is a lot of British people at the moment are a bit lazy and they’ve got used to not doing the minimum paid jobs and the low paid work so they need to be forced into taking these jobs,” says Jamie Bragginton.

The government claims it is now doing just that: “We are reforming the welfare system to ensure that we end the benefit dependency which has trapped so many people, and finally ensure work pays.”

But while the long-term unemployed can be forced to look for jobs, there is no guarantee they will get them.Like its pledges on immigration, it looks like another promise the UK government simply cannot keep.

Click the link below to watch a video about it.

https://www.rt.com/news/immigrants-take-uk-jobs-447/

Quote:Does Immigration From EU Countries Cause Unemployment In The UK?

[Image: n-IAIN-DUNCAN-SMITH-THERESA-MAY-large570.jpg]

Did soaring immigration under the last Labour government cost British workers their jobs?

That was the message from Iain Duncan Smith and Theresa May when they unveiled on Monday a decision to ban EU jobseekers from claiming housing benefit.

In a joint article in the Daily Mail, the cabinet ministers wrote: "In just five years between 2005 and 2010, for every British person who fell out of work, almost two foreign nationals gained employment."

Jonathan Portes, director of the National Institute for Social and Economic Research and former Cabinet Office chief economist during that period, disagrees.

"The period of high immigration that began in the late 1990s actually coincided with historically very high employment rates for British-born workers," he told HuffPostUK.

"The mid-2000s saw the highest sustained employment rates in recorded history, and in late 2007, the chances that a Briton of working age was in employment was considerably higher than 10 years earlier."

NIESR's Portes argues employment "fell as a result of the financial crisis and resulting recession, but this had little or nothing to do with immigration."

Atul Hatwal, director of the pro-immigration group Migration Matters, told HuffPostUK: "The implication that migrants took British jobs on an industrial scale is incorrect.

"The government's figures show that from 2005 to 2008 the numbers of Britons in jobs actually rose - by 116,000. This was a period of near full employment in Britain with demand for workers often outstripping supply so it's no surprise that employers turned to migrants to fill the gap. As a result the numbers of migrants in work rose by 660,000.

"It is not the case that migrants and British workers are just competing for the same jobs. In 2008, when migration was at its height, the number of unfilled vacancies was the highest ever recorded at 700,000."

[Image: o-IMMIGRATION-570.jpg]

"From the crash at the end of 2008 to the start of 2010, the government figures show that the numbers of Britons and migrants in work went down - in both cases by 3%."

Ministers are also falling foul of what economists call the "lump of labour fallacy" as they suggest that there is a fixed quantity of work to be done in the UK so any extra workers would reduce the number of jobs available, whereas they actually increase the size of the economy and end up increasing the amount of jobs available.

Duncan Smith and May cite "evidence from the Migration Advisory Committee" in their article to suggest that immigration negatively affects British workers in the Labour market.

However a report from Jonathan Wadsworth, member of the Migration Advisory Committee, shows that "there is little evidence of overall adverse effects of immigration on wages and employment for people born in the UK."

He adds that it is "hard to find evidence of much displacement of UK workers or lower wages... they certainly do not receive preferential access to housing."

It may make political sense for ministers to blame rising unemployment on immigration from the EU, however the economic evidence does not necessarily back that up.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/01/...32089.html

Quote:There's a reason British youngsters aren't working, Dave. It's called immigration

This is the reason young people are out of work.

I don't know about you, but I'm beginning to wonder how we survived a decade or so ago. If you listened to the likes of David Cameron, it's as if our young people have been a permanent scourge on the state, blood-sucking parasites dragging the nation down. We're bone idle, useless, lack the work ethic and need a good kicking. Hence, Cameron has been forced to look at ruling out unemployment and housing benefits for British youngsters.

Certainly the welfare state in Britain has been too generous and created a culture of dependency and abuse of taxpayers' cash. But that isn't age-specific: there are plenty of fiftysomethings who have dragged five kids up, feeding and clothing them with state money in a house they were given, tuning into Jeremy Kyle on the plasma TV rather than showing any interest in working.

Cameron's desire to bar under-25s from claiming unemployment benefit once again sees the British government turn on our abandoned youth. We are already the generation set to inherit the colossal debt piled up firstly by Labour and now the Coalition and that's bad enough in itself. But the more immediate issue is the one of mass uncontrolled immigration and just how badly it has hurt the prospects of our young – something I've never heard Cameron speak about, let alone act upon.
I meet young people almost every day who feel they have been screwed over by successive governments. They were urged to go to university, to rack up the debt – only to come out and find a labour market flooded with older, more experienced foreign workers and few graduate jobs. The result? Millions of graduates reduced to taking any job they can find after months of graft or in many cases, failing to find one at all. There is also the new sensation of interning for those lucky enough to have the backing of a family who can bankroll them in exchange for experience and contacts, yet another blow against British meritocracy.

Do not buy into the narrative that the jobs are there. In many places, they are not. British builders have been priced out of the market by foreign competitors. How many British workers do you now see in the hotels, restaurants, even in the wards of some NHS hospitals? Employers have started to listen to the politicians' mantra: foreign workers work harder. British youngsters are useless.

The discrimination is subtle but is starting to creep in. Hire an Eastern European if you get the chance, you'll get more bang for your buck. It would be condemned as racist if the opposite were suggested.

The barriers to entry for employment for our young people are being stacked higher and higher by cowardly, conniving politicians insisting that uncontrolled immigration is an economic necessity. In many cases, angry youngsters have given up. The fact that Cameron is seeking to add further misery and hardship to their lives is a disgrace.

Read the comments of this article.
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/michae...migration/

[Image: _73254069_uk_migration_624_5.gif]

[source]

[Image: _85201805_net_migration_624.png]

[source]

Quote:Some 532,000 people migrated to the UK in the year ending September, up from the 497,000 people who arrived during the previous year, while 320,000 left the country, down from the 343,000 the previous year.

If 500,000 immigrants enter Britain each year, 300,000 people leave each year, and 200,000 people stay - then in five years the population has increased by 1 million due to immigrants. In ten years that's two million. In thirteen years, there will be enough immigrants added to Britain to make up the unemployment rate (not including the people on workfare).

Back in the early 90s and also the 80s, anyone could get a job guaranteed in one week. People used to be able to knock on factories and other workplaces, ask them if they're hiring, and be hired on the spot. Not any more you can't. And we wonder why university graduates face youth unemployment in Europe.

Spain youth unemployment reaches record 56.1%

Quote:Youth unemployment: Fears over record figures

Young people are being "shunted into the sidelines" as they face a growing threat of unemployment, a business group has warned. Andrew Cave, from the Federation of Small Businesses, said the future looked gloomy for the young unemployed. The latest figures showed youth unemployment rose to a fresh record high, with more than one in five 16 to 24-year-olds out of work. Prime Minister David Cameron said the figure was a matter of "great regret".
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12482018

Quote:Youth unemployment hits 1 million
  • UK unemployment rises to 2.62m, a 17-year high
  • Youth unemployment rate at 21.9%
  • Claimant count rises to 1.6 million
  • Employment minister blames the eurozone

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2011...hits-1m-uk
02-17-2016 07:46 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
Quote:Europe's young jobless: 'finding work has become a matter of survival'

[Image: job-rejection-email-010.jpg?w=620&am...ea274a4240]

As youth unemployment rates continue to rise across Europe, people tell of their struggles to get a job and fears for the future.

A rejection email sent to Rachel Grey. The graduate says she has made 400 applications for jobs. Click on the picture to see full email
As part of our series on Europe's youth unemployment crisis, we asked readers to tell their stories of frustration and indignation. A selection of responses follows.

Have your say below the line.

Rachel Grey, 23, Middlesbrough, UK
I've been unemployed since finishing university in July 2011. My hopes after graduating [with a 2:1 in sociology from a Russell Group university] weren't unrealistic. I was prepared to take any job to build up enough experience to find a job in London. Instead, I've ended up living at home with my parents. I feel incredibly guilty about still having to live with my parents and like I've let them and my partner down by not being able to get a job. I never imagined I could feel as worthless as being unemployed has made me feel. I dread talking to friends and family because I'll have to explain that I still haven't found a job.

I've sent well over 400 applications and I've had only a few job interviews, as well as a handful for work experience and internship placements. On the whole, I've had very little feedback, bar the generic "the standard of applicants was very high … tough decision … regret to inform you". Ironically, none of the interviews I've had have been for the admin-type roles I'm required to apply for by the jobcentre – which decided admin was the most suitable route. Most entry-level admin positions are advertised as apprenticeships because of government funding which allows employers to pay £2.65/hr as opposed to the national minimum wage of £6.19/hr. The problem is that government funding is not available if the employee holds a degree.

I'm at the point now where I have a sense of detachment from interviews – that isn't to say I don't make an effort, just that I'm almost numb to the fear I used to feel. The way I see it is I cannot possibly fall any further than I already have, so if I go in and give it my all and I don't get the job, I haven't lost anything.

I'm required by the jobcentre to send out speculative applications, which I find insulting to the employer and demoralising to myself when I have to presume they will want to employ me without any experience.

I'm worried about the strain my unemployment is putting on my family. The cost of having both children living at home – my sibling is due to graduate in July – even paying full rent, with one parent employed and one on a pension, is going to be difficult.

[Image: Rachel-Grey-010.jpg?w=620&amp;q=85&a...0a526c2018]

Rachel Grey, 23: 'I'm worried about what such a long period of unemployment will look like to future employers.'
I'm also worried about what such a long period of unemployment will look like to future employers. I know that I haven't spent two years being lazy and living off the taxpayer, but employers skim-reading CVs won't know that and if it doesn't rule me out of the shortlist, I won't even be able to explain at an interview.

Salva Camarasa, 30, Barcelona, Spain
I've been looking for work in a motion graphics studio or as a video editor or camera operator since I started university in 2006. But since 2011, I've been looking for anything because I barely earn enough money to make repayments on my student loan.

On average I apply for three to four jobs a day but since March 2012 I haven't had a single interview, not even a phone call or email. I once took the Yellow Pages and went to every studio I found to deliver my CV in person. The only feedback I've ever had are from jobs outside Spain who politely told me to keep going. But hey, at least they gave me some feedback!

I've got a degree in media and communications as well as training in digital graphic design. My hopes were focused on working in something I could deliver all my motivation, skills and knowledge, more than just having an economical motivation: I felt I was wasting my time and others' working in an office or in retail.

There's almost no job advice here and the Spanish government has brutally trimmed courses for the unemployed, as well as student grants and education in general. When my last job ended in November 2012, I received €380 (£325) a month for six months from the state. But now that's ended I have no idea what to do. I've had to ask my parents for help and I can't describe how horrible it makes me feel because at my age, it shreds my status of being an independent individual.

They tell us to be patient. But the Spanish government is doing almost nothing to stop this disaster. How can we be patient when we see months and years pass by and we're still getting nowhere?

What worries me is that I'm stuck in this vicious circle. You have no money to study something else, the time you're unemployed increases therefore you become less employable, and you keep moving in a wheel like a hamster with no chance of getting out. I do see the possibility of things changing but not before five to 10 years and by then I'll be 40 years old! If nothing changes, what I'm supposed to do then?

[Image: Salva-Camarasa-010.jpg?w=620&amp;q=8...51be90dba5]

Salva Camarasa, 30: 'I apply for 3-4 jobs a day but since March 2012 I haven't had a single interview.'

I try to maintain a positive attitude but time is passing, the situation is getting worse and I'm starting to show signs of weakening. I'm starting to lose all hope. My feelings alternate between guilt and "it's not your fault". I also try to empathise with the ones that are in the same situation than me, or in a worse situation, to tell myself I'm not the only one stranded in the beach.

If someone told me to move 8,000 miles away to give me an opportunity, you can bet I'd be flying there right now. But my problem is: no work, no savings. Without money to do anything you can't make the situation any better.

Panayiotis Christodoulou, 26, Nicosia, Cyprus

I'm worried that my degree will soon have no value. When the economy recovers I'll be 35 years old and unable to find work as a junior and without the experience for a more senior position.

I knew things weren't going to be ideal and getting a job was going to be a hard task – I graduated from the University of Nicosia with a communications degree. During my studies I worked as a DIY sales adviser but had to leave after one-and-a-half years as my course demanded a practical exam of a month's work in a newspaper and I was unable to take the time off work.

Since graduating I've sent on average about 25-30 applications a month, and I'd welcome any position related to my degree, such as a journalist, presenter, writer or PR adviser. During the past two to three years a lot of media organisations have been shrinking with news websites finding it difficult to attract adverts to survive.

Finding work has now become a matter of survival and I'm looking for almost anything. But it's been hard to convince employers that my dream is to become a storekeeper, or a sales person for a spare parts car company, after spending four years and €40,000 on tuition fees. They tell me they will spend time and money to train me and cannot risk losing me when there are so many other candidates available. Despite months of going to the department of labour for job advice and seeking assistance I, along with many other people, have not been offered even a single job.

I've been receiving €600 a month from the government for the past six months – which is the maximum time – until a couple of weeks ago. Now that I don't have any income besides limited help from my family it is very hard. I feel uncertainty. It has affected me psychologically and given me feelings of depression. Lately I am not able to enjoy simple things, such as a drink with friends, exercise, or concentrate on watching a movie or reading a book. I've also put on a lot of weight. I was supposed to start building my life and moving forward after graduation. I am at the age considered the most productive yet I cannot even earn enough for the basics.

I'd prefer to stay in Cyprus, but am thinking about moving abroad despite the fact that a lot of countries in the EU and the world are in a similar situation. It will be easier to go to the UK given that the only language I know besides Greek is English. Still, I'd prefer to stay here.

Coline Willinger, 25, Montpellier, France

[Image: Coline-Willinger-010.jpg?w=620&amp;q...9e08059477]

Coline Willinger, 25, says she has applied for more that 100 jobs and had only four interviews.

I went to university for six years and graduated with a master's degree in political science. I was hoping I'd find employment more quickly than I have. After volunteering at a website I found a job at a radio station that paid €560 a month; €460 by the state and the rest by the station. Although it gave me independence it wasn't enough to live on comfortably and at the end of the contract I moved back to my mother's home. Since then I've sent over 100 applications. I've had four interviews: three in Montpellier and one in Marseille.

I'm a bit desperate because employers require a lot of skills: speaking many languages, having many years of experience, specific diplomas. I do not really come across any openings for beginners. I'm also a bit disappointed because I expected after those long years of studies that my search would be a lot easier. I'm worried because I'm starting to believe that I'm not going to find my "dream job", the one I've been studying this long for. I might have to accept one which is not what I'm looking for. Most of my friends have found jobs even if it's an assisted contract where the employer receives financial support from the government and the employee receives minimum wage.

I know we have to make concessions, but I'm torn between believing in the education I've got or stop dreaming and start building a life.

I don't really know what to do.

If I could find a job I would finally have independence, and be able to start to build my life properly.

Ioannis Pelegrinis, 30, Athens, Greece
I was forced to quit my previous job to join the Greek army for my compulsory, and financially crippling, unpaid nine-month military service. After I was discharged, I discovered I was not eligible for any government assistance or benefits. I registered with the unemployment agency (OAED) for about four months, but they were unable to help. Work opportunities are few and far between, particularly for younger people. Most of my friends are out of a job. A couple have work cash-in-hand or uninsured and underpaid part-time jobs.

I left Greece in 2000 to study in the UK, where I got my bachelor's, master's and MPhil degrees in media and cultural studies. I had hopes of finding a creative job in media. I had been searching for a job for about six months during my military service, primarily office work and in the media and marketing sector, where my education might be of use.

My employment condition has recently changed; after what appeared to be a four-month internship I have been employed part-time by a newspaper in Athens. Aside from the pay not being regular, I am uninsured and expected to work longer full-time hours when needed. Aside from the feeling of having a purpose in the morning on my way to work, the irregular rate of pay has made me more paranoid about my daily expenses and the general state of the economy.

I had a couple of interviews before settling for my current job. I think they went all right, the interviewers seemed to be interested in my academic background, though slightly concerned about my limited experience.

My short-term worries are to hold this job and be able to make a career out of it; with all the uncertainty I fear I could be out of a job at any moment. I used to think that if I got a job I would feel more relaxed and at ease. Sometimes I think I am more miserable now than when I was unemployed. I am worried about my health and to what extent I will be able to contribute to my family's wellbeing, particularly my parents who are growing older. I feel trapped; that there is no real hope or anything to look forward to in Greece any more.

While I know I should pursue opportunities abroad, I am finding an ever-increasing number of practical and sentimental reasons to remain in Greece. I have given myself until the end of the year to see how things work out.

Emilie Graille, 25, Charleville-Mézières, France
There aren't any opportunities within 124 miles of where I live as I'm qualified for a really specific line of work. I know that for my next job I'll have to move far away as I did with my previous position – I had to move more than 373 miles away for my first temporary contract.

I have an undergraduate degree in chemistry from the University of Caen and a postgraduate degree in environmental management and water treatments from the University of Limoges. I was really lucky to find temporary work quickly after graduation.

I've sent around 80 applications and had eight interviews – one in France and seven in the UK – since the beginning of the year. I've had feedback most of the time and according to interviewers I have a high standard, but they always choose another candidate with a better score.

I have an employment adviser who looks after me really closely. During my second interview, I impressed one of my interviewers. He sent me detailed feedback and documents to help me describe personal abilities and skills. I am very grateful to this person.

I am looking for positions abroad because there are many more opportunities in the UK, maybe because studies are really expensive there, and a lot of employers are looking for engineers. But for now I depend on the French unemployment system, meaning I can't move abroad to look for jobs.

I feel desperate sometimes to think I have had so many interviews but no offer of work. The thing I hate most is I can't choose the location where I would like to go because the position is too specific. You also don't have a clear vision of your future.

I'm worried because I know that my unemployment allowance won't last for ever and soon I'll have to go back to my parents' house.

Tell us your job hunt story.
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/...s-survival

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(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016 07:49 PM by tynamite.)
02-17-2016 07:48 PM
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Quote:Young, qualified and jobless: plight of Europe's best-educated generation
Twentysomethings missing out on the homes, pensions, independence and confidence that come with steady employment

[Image: Spain-protest-008.jpg?w=620&amp;q=85...d96368ad50]

"All your life," says Argyro Paraskeva, "you've been told you're a golden prince. The future awaits: it's bright, it's yours. You have a degree! You'll have a good job, a fine life. And then suddenly you find it's not true."

Or not so suddenly. Paraskeva left Thessaloniki University five years ago with an MSc in molecular biology. Beyond some private tutoring, paid essay writing ("I'm not proud. But a 50-page essay is €150") and a short unhappy spell in a medical laboratory, she hasn't worked since.

Over cold tea in a sunlit cafe in Greece's second city, Paraskeva says she has written "literally hundreds of letters". Every few months, a new round: schools, labs, hospitals, clinics, companies. She delivers them by hand, around the region. She's had three interviews. "I will go anywhere, really anywhere," she says. "I no longer have the luxury of believing I have a choice. If someone wants a teacher, I will go. If they want a secretary, I will go. If they want a lab assistant, I will go."

So would countless other young Europeans. According to data out on Monday more than 5.5 million under-25s are without work, and the number rises inexorably every month. It's been called the "lost generation", a legion of young, often highly qualified people, entering a so-called job market that offers very few any hope of a job – let alone the kind they have been educated for.

European leaders are rarely without a new initiative. Last week, they pledged to spend €6bn (£5bn) over two years to fund job creation, training and apprenticeships for young people in an attempt to counter a scourge that has attained historic proportions. This week, Angela Merkel is convening a jobs summit to address the issue. Yet still the numbers mount up. In Greece, 59.2% of under-25s are out of work. In Spain, youth unemployment stands at 56.5%; in Italy, it hovers around 40%.

[Image: Euro-jobless-007.jpg?w=620&amp;q=85&...6d099ea336]

Some commentators say the figures overstate the problem: young people in full-time education or training (a large proportion, obviously) are not considered "economically active" and so in some countries are counted as unemployed. That, they say, produces an exaggerated youth unemployment rate.

But others point out Europe's "economically inactive" now include millions of young people (14 million, according to the French president, François Hollande) not in work, education or training but who, while technically not unemployed, are nonetheless jobless – and have all but given up looking, at least in their own country. Millions more are on low-paying, temporary contracts. By most measures, the situation is dire.

In the words of Enrico Giovannini, Italy's employment minister, this is a disaster all the more shocking because it is hitting Europe's best-educated generation: in Spain, nearly 40% of people in their 20s and early 30s have degrees; in Greece it's 30%; in Italy, more than 20%.

The crisis is even more acute because of its knock-on impact: these are often young people with no pensions, no social security contributions, diminishing networks, limited opportunities for independence. High youth unemployment doesn't just mean social problems and productivity wasted; it means falling birthrates and intergenerational tension between parents and their thirtysomethings still living at home. "A wholesale destruction," a Bologna University professor says, "of human capital".

In the first three months of last year, Paraskeva earned €300. Then nothing for four months, then €250 more, then nothing again. She spends "€30 a week, max, mostly my parents' money". She is not entitled to unemployment benefit because what little work she has done has mostly been on the black market. So at 29, she's back living at home with her parents. Her mother has rheumatoid arthritis, her father is on dialysis – but both, thankfully, still have their jobs as teachers. And their health insurance.

As a registered jobseeker, Paraskeva gets a few discounts, and free screenings at Thessaloniki's film festivals. She goes to classes for the jobless: art, fantasy fiction, French. She sees friends (though most of her classmates have gone abroad; she might too, next year, a funded PhD in the United States). She collects her parents' prescriptions. She reads, a lot.

"You have to find a routine," she says. "You need a routine. And to meet other people like you, that's really important. To understand that it's not your fault, you've done nothing wrong, that everyone's in the same boat." But still, some mornings "you wake up and there's … no meaning to getting out of bed".

Sporadically, this overwhelming frustration boils over into anger on the streets: the indignados of Spain, the near-riots that have scarred Athens in recent months, the great movement of Portuguese protesters that forced the government into an embarrassing U-turn last year. This month, thousands marched in Rome to demand action on record unemployment.

But in between times, young people are just as likely to respond to their predicament with a mixture of gloom and resignation.

Vasilis Stolis, 27, has a master's in political science and – apart from odd evenings playing the bouzouki in restaurants until the work dried up – has been unemployed since 2010. "Sometimes, I'm not going to lie, it feels really bad," he says. Stolis lives in a flat belonging to his grandfather. His parents, other family members, "anyone who still has an income, basically", chip in to help with the €350-odd a month he lives on. "It's frankly miserable, sometimes," he says. "You pay the bills. You go out with a girl you like, you can buy just one drink. No cinema. No holidays."

[Image: Vasilis-Stolis-008.jpg?w=620&amp;q=8...b57b0b6dbb]

Vasilis Stolis lives in his grandfather's flat and relies on family handouts.

If most of these young people in the worst-affected states – Greece, Spain, Italy and Portugal – are getting by, it must be at least partly thanks to some remarkably resilient, close-knit families. Many are still at home, or living – like Vasilis – in places owned by a relative, and with the help of parental handouts.

"The family," says Andrea Pareschi, 21, a political sciences graduate from Bologna, "has become the primary social security system." (That's while wages, pensions and benefits hold up, of course; in Greece at least, both – certainly in the public sector – are shrinking fairly fast. Stolis's father, who works for the health service, has seen his salary slashed from €2,500 to €1,500 a month.)

One way of postponing the issue is to prolong your studies. "As long as you're studying, you have something to do," says Sylvia Melchiorre, 26, who graduated from Bologna, Italy's oldest university, spent 12 months as an au pair in Paris, and has come back to do two more years of languages and literature.

[Image: Daniele-Bitetti-and-Sylvi-005.jpg?w=620&...25ef6ab4e5]

Daniele Bitetti and Sylvia Melchiorre, from Puglia, are both unable to find work. Melchiorre has returned to her studies and her boyfriend may soon do the same.

Her boyfriend, Daniele Bitetti, also 26, will apply for a PhD in human geography unless he finds a job soon. The couple, from Puglia, pay €300 rent plus bills for their apartment – helped by their parents who send each some €600 a month.

"Studying at least makes you feel that you're not doing nothing," says Melchiorre. "You do three years, then a couple more, and then – my God, what next? A master's, a PhD … and never a job at the end of it."

Others are simply packing up and leaving: this crisis is seeing young Europeans emigrate in unprecedented numbers. More than 120,000 recently qualified doctors, engineers, IT professionals and scientists – half with second degrees – have left Greece since 2010, a University of Thessaloniki study found this year.

"It's a terrible loss for this country," says Sofia Papadimitriou, who is applying to study bioinformatics in the Netherlands next year. "It trains all these brains, and they all leave. The government says the future will be different; they will come back. I'm not so sure."

In previous decades – after the second world war, in the 1960s and 70s – Italian emigrants were mainly unskilled workers, fleeing a life of poverty. Last year, emigration from Italy jumped 30%. Half the leavers were aged 20-40, and twice as many as a decade ago had degrees.

In Spain, the employment ministry estimates more than 300,000 people aged under 30 have left the country since the 2008 crash. Some 68% more are seriously considering it, according to a European commission study.

Among them is Lucia Parejo-Bravo, 22, leaving Málaga University next month with a business management degree and the firm intention of finding a job in Germany, where she studied for a year. "Most of my friends have left: to the US, UK, South America, Asia, Scandinavia, Canada," she says. "Staying here means fighting – I mean really fighting – to find a job. If by a miracle you do get one, it's €600 a month. Or less, if they make you work self-employed. They get away with it because there are just so many of us so desperate for work. Germany won't be easy, but at least it will be fair."

[Image: Lucia-Parejo-Bravo-008.jpg?w=620&amp...5805d128ce]

Lucia Parejo-Bravo plans to move from Spain to Germany to find work after graduating.

Not all are as optimistic as Parejo-Bravo. Spain's particular problem is that of the 1.8 million Spaniards under 30 looking for a job, more than half are poorly qualified. Victims of the burst property bubble, they left school to earn €2,000 a month or more on construction sites and in building supply firms.

Those jobs have now gone, and will not return for many years. But in the meantime, says David Triguero, 27, at Málaga's crowded Playa las Acacias with friends, "we bought nice cars. I bought a flat. Some got married; had kids. My benefits run out in February. I don't see a future. Nothing."

Things do not seem quite so bleak for Victor Portillo Sánchez, but he too does not see his future in Spain. At 31, about to finish his PhD (the EU-funded money has run out), he entertains no hopes of staying in a country "that's closing research centres it opened only five years ago".

Portillo too gets by "with the help of my parents, and on my savings. But it doesn't feel good to be spending your savings at 31." He has failed to find part-time work teaching, and as a waiter and barman.

So after defending his thesis this summer, he'll be off. "Anywhere, it could be," he says. "If you'd told me three years ago I might apply for a job in Sweden, I'd have laughed. Or in Newcastle. I went there once, for a conference."

Are they happy to leave? Three, four, maybe five years abroad, says Portillo: fine. Nice, even. But this feels more like exile. "I don't see there being a job for me in Spain in five years' time," he says. "Nor in 10. Maybe not ever. And that pisses me off. My dad's not in great shape."

This is not an adventure, Portillo says: "Sorry. It's not like a gap year. If it was my choice, then OK. If I'd fallen in love, something like that. But I'm being forced to leave, to look for food. And I may never come back. That worries me."

They have much to worry them, these young people. Now, true, it is summer: in Thessaloniki and Bologna and Málaga the days are long, the sun is shining, the beach beckons. "We're young, you know?" says Melchiorre in Bologna. "We must live for the day. We have friends. Cafes. It could be worse."

But come September, and once a few years have passed, says Vera Martinelli, "you really don't feel so good. I know. I've been there. I'm 33. September is the time of fresh starts, new beginnings. Except for me it won't be."

[Image: building-site-in-spain-008.jpg?w=620&...5e62a53a48]

An abandoned building in Madrid. Across Spain, the expectation of finding work on building sites vanished when the property bubble burst.

Martinelli lives with her husband in a flat belonging to her grandad, a former professor. She has a degree in languages and literature, studied at the Sorbonne and in Oxford, did postgraduate work, trained as a teacher, and worked for three years with chronically ill children. Her unemployment benefit ran out in 2011. The couple live on her husband's (recently reduced) salary of €900 a month, and occasional help – "bills, car insurance, that kind of thing" – from family. She wants to do "something useful, that's all. For an NGO, ideally. But actually, at this stage, for anyone. I just want something to do every day."

The worst, she says, is "when people ask, what are you? And I have no answer. Everything seems to have blurred. I'm not a teenager any more: I'm married. I grew up with feminism; I can't say 'I'm a wife'. And I'm not a grown-up, because I don't have a job. I don't know what I am."

What they all do know is that the world they live in has changed, completely. The kind of working lives their parents have enjoyed and are still enjoying, they understand, will not be open to these people: stable, full-time jobs, a pension.

"They could choose from lots of jobs," says Melchiorre. "They could take time to decide. They knew they'd have work for 40 years. Now they know they'll retire, in six or seven years' time. I have no job, and no money, now. Maybe I'll have none in 10 years. Maybe I'll never be able to retire."

For some, this looks quite exciting. "Every generation has its challenges," says a bullish Stefano Onofri, 21, embarking on a master's in international management. "This is ours. This is the world we're in. It's what we've got now. Opportunities don't die, they just change."

[Image: Young-people-in-Bologna-008.jpg?w=620&am...a079a3819e]

Stefano Onofri, Caterina Moruzzi, Alessandro Calzolari and Andrea Pareschi, who are likely to have very different working lives to those of their parents.

His friend Alessandro Calzolari, 23, midway through a masters in theoretical physics and looking at a career in nanotechnology, sees clearly that "we will all have to be entrepreneurs, with ourselves. We will be constantly selling ourselves. It is quite exciting. Scary, but exciting."

A few have already started. Riccardo Vastola, 28, studied marketing and communications but founded a music business in 2009, organising indie rock gigs, events, club nights in and around Bologna. It's officially an association at the moment, but next year will hopefully become a company.

"I felt I had to do this," he says. "I had to do something I enjoy and that let me work with other people, create like a little family in my work. That was important to me. I'm not sure I could do a 'classic' job in some big company."

For the moment, it's working: Vastola takes home a bit less than €1,000 a month, enough to live on.

[Image: Riccardo-Vastola-008.jpg?w=620&amp;q...9de662ceef]

Riccardo Vastola, one of a new breed of entrepreneurs, started a music business in Bologna.
In Thessaloniki, the same motivation spurred Stolis to set up alterthess.gr, an alternative news website, with four friends.

He's not making money. "But it's really important to me," Stolis says. "We're working together. That's hope for the future. I think more and more of us will be like this, doing our own projects. People have got it now. That degree wasn't the key to prestige and security everyone said it was. And not everyone can be doctors or lawyers or engineers."

Konstantis Sevris, a 25-year-old political science graduate in Thessaloniki, had a money-spinning idea: a youth hostel, with rented bikes, in a city with 100,000 students that doesn't have one. "I've tried," he says. "The tourist office told me there was no law in Greece for youth hostels. You can have hotels, or rooms to rent. There's a lot of crazy like this in Greece."

But not everyone is ready for a brave new world. "In Italy at least, they don't teach that mentality," says Calzolari. "They don't create a culture where it becomes possible. In the US, start-ups get launched right after university. Not here."

Most said they were largely happy with the quality of university teaching. And they reject the idea of a strictly utilitarian system, tailoring courses and student numbers to available jobs. "University has to be about developing our minds, too," says Caterina Moruzzi, 22, a philosophy master's student at Bologna. "People should be able to pursue what interests them. What would society be otherwise?"

[Image: Graduate-barometer-001.jpg?w=620&amp...552855cd43]

But many feel universities need to do more to prepare students for a new reality. "We're taught how to think, not how to do," says Pareschi. "University here is about learning, not working," says Calzolari: "There's very little connection with the world of work. Few internships."

And almost all are worried about the longer-term consequences of the working environment they see being sketched out for them: Europe's social systems, they point out, are all built around stable, full-time, long-term jobs.

"So we're out there, building our own brand, for hire," says Portillo in Málaga. "Except nothing's set up for that. Say I go to the US, pay into a private pension fund for 10 years. Then I come back, at 41. The Spanish pension system isn't going to let me opt out. It's going to tell me I have to work 30 years, in Spain, for a pension. How's that work?"

In Bologna, Martinelli feels much the same: "I know I'll never have a job like my mother had, teaching English all her life," she says. "It could be great, lots of jobs. But only if when I'm ill I'm covered, when I'm unemployed I'll be OK, when I'm 75, I'll be able to retire."

No one, Martinelli says, seems to be thinking about that. Just like no one is thinking about the implications, longer term, of her and her 30-something unemployed friends not having babies. Sylvia knows a couple who are putting in PhD application simply because "that's three years' income assured. They could start a family. How wrong, as a situation, is that?"
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/ju...-qualified

Quote:The unemployed young academic: facing life on the outside
Three months after finishing his PhD, one young academic is now claiming job seekers allowance and finding out that the 'real world' neither understands nor appreciates his skills

[Image: asda-checkout-007.jpg?w=620&amp;q=85...d3a383e96a]

"I'm called complacent for failing to respond to listed vacancies for checkout operators at Asda." Photograph: David Levene

Passing my viva without corrections was just the latest addition to a spotless educational record. Despite any initial fears, my work was warmly-received and plans were quickly put in motion to transform the thesis into a book. This was the final validation from colleagues and mentors who had long assured me that I would have a bright future as a sociologist.

So how did I end up unemployed?

Understand that I would usually consider it distasteful to list my achievements like this, but am finding that modesty is becoming an obsolete quality in today's labour market. I tell you my achievements only to put my recent experiences in context. Life since the PhD has been hard.

Unlike many of my peers, I did not prioritise my employability when I was still a student. Though I did teach and present at a few conferences, I chose to focus most of my energy on crafting my thesis and getting it finished within the funding period. I am passionate about my work and stick by this decision, but what I am now learning is that while I left my viva exam ready to make a mark on the world, ready to prove that I merited the praise given me, I was still just one candidate in a congested academic job market.

After graduating, I spent two months finishing my leftover teaching and marking before becoming unemployed. I have applied for around twenty jobs and received one interview, which was unsuccessful. I am out in the cold but I try to remain positive. There are undoubtedly merits to my situation as an unemployed academic; it is wonderful to have so much time in which to think and write. I do, however, feel distant from the warmth of the institution that, over the past years, has validated who I am and what I think.

One of the unfortunate things about creative achievements within academia is that they cannot always be expressed in a way that is meaningful to the 'outside world'. Floating free of the university, I encounter few people in my daily life who care about my talents as a writer and researcher. I have been claiming Jobseekers' allowance for the previous three months and my advisors at the Job Centre are certainly not impressed.

One of the problems I am encountering is that most of the activities that young academics need to perform in order to improve their chances of employment – presenting at conferences, networking, writing articles to satisfy the upcoming Research Excellence Framework (REF), or crafting watertight personal statements – are not seen by Job Centre advisors as legitimate uses of time as an 'unemployee'. In a recent review with an advisor, not even my hours spent preparing for a job interview were considered a legitimate use of time. Time spent researching the role was considered time wasted, in which I should have been contacting further prospective employers.

After only three months claiming Jobseekers' Allowance, my advisors are already suggesting that my aspirations to work in academia are unrealistic. They do not understand the nature of my qualifications and call me complacent for failing to respond to listed vacancies for cleaners and checkout operators at Asda and Tesco. It is the unperturbed nature of these tellings-off that I find most distressing; the eerily casual manner in which it is suggested that I turn my back on my vocation, my identity, and eight years worth of learning and training.

I am familiar with the theories that explain the social mechanics and emotional consequences of what I am going through – I used to teach them. This irony has been a source of wry amusement. I make a lot of jokes these days, sometimes telling friends that I am going to draw on my experiences to write a satirical sequel to Harry Potter, whereby, realising his degree from Hogwarts has no value in the labour market, Harry is forced to get a job in a Virgin Media call centre. On gloomier days I flesh out the story: the narrative will move between Harry looking depressed in his headset taking call after call, and flashbacks to the good old days with Ron and the gang, back when a young wizard's skills were worth something. But I do wonder how long my friends will find this joke funny.

Humour is a horribly transparent coping strategy. A more enduring strategy is to take a sort of sociological interest in one's experiences. Following the philosopher Bertrand Russell, I believe that any experience that does not cause significant harm can be interesting, regardless of whether its character is positive or negative. Whilst visiting the job centre has been a particularly disheartening experience, I have certainly valued it as a source of social insight.

Still, as time goes on and I remain out of work, I can feel my sociological curiosity starting to wear off. Perhaps I am worrying too early, but I do feel like I am walking into a trap. In my struggle to find even a part-time academic job, I am forced to wonder how long the welfare system will tolerate me.
http://www.theguardian.com/higher-educat...employment

In the olden days, you could leave school with school qualifications if you were born in the 60s, become a teacher and end up with a pension. Not any more you can't. Nowadays to become a teacher you need a teaching school qualification after getting your degree.

Ed Miliband from the Labour Party was going to guarantee all unemployed people jobs after 1 or 2 years as the government would give them the job, but the idiots voted for Conservative instead, so David Cameron implemented workfare so people have to work for their benefits. I still can't believe it now. I can't wait for the brexit referendum so Britain can leave europe. Immigrants won't be allowed to vote in it. Why do people vote for shit politicians under a democracy?

What is the cause of mass unemployment in europe?

Mass immigration
(This post was last modified: 02-17-2016 07:55 PM by tynamite.)
02-17-2016 07:50 PM
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Post: #215
RE: R.I.P. London
This is the kind of shit that goes on with some immigrants. The lady in the article is Bangladeshi - I have joked with my freinds before that UK should stop all welfare to South Asians - the Indians would be OK but the Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities would be fucked.

Bedford mum in court for making false claims for housing benefit

Quote:A BEDFORD mother-of-four who cannot speak, read or write English, made false claims for housing benefit, a court heard today.

Sufia Begum, 30, was helped by her brother-in-law to fill in the Bedford Borough Council forms but did not reveal all her husband's bank accounts to the local authority and did not inform them that she was living in a house belonging to her brother-in-law.

Begum, now of Roff Avenue, Bedford, pleaded not guilty to seven charges of dishonestly making false representations to claim benefit at Luton Crown Court.

She admitted 7 lesser charges of obtaining the benefit without doing so dishonestly.

On 21 May 2009 she did not declare that her then home at 85 Honeyhill Road was owned by a relative and, in May 2012, September 2013 and October 2013, she did not declare that her husband owned a £15,000 leasehold property at Unit 2, 8 Bedford East, Yardley Hastings.

On the same occasions she did not declare that her husband had other bank accounts.

Prosecutor Rory Keene said that roughly £485 per week of her husband's income was not being declared.


She was of previous good character.

Matthew Kirk, defending, said: "She is unable to speak, read or write English. She was supported by her brother-in-law to fill in the forms and she answered his questions in good faith."

Mr Kirk said that his client had 'very scant knowledge' of her husband's business. "She had no sense of the scale or how he was conducting his business. She was unaware of the money turning over in his account."

He said the effect was that the council had overpaid her benefit.

Judge Peter Wright adjourned sentence until 7 March for a probation officer to prepare a report. He said: "I want to know her personal circumstances and income position," he said.

She was granted bail.
02-17-2016 08:45 PM
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Post: #216
RE: R.I.P. London
Your argument for mass displacement level immigration of Britons is, "I'm an immigrant, so, I will be for it, regardless of the effects on the native, and if anyone disagrees with me, they are a xenophobe".

This is insanely self-serving and insulting to native Britons.
02-17-2016 08:52 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-17-2016 05:01 PM)rudebwoy Wrote:  I am one of those non-white immigrants you speak of and I live very well, most of us aren't on welfare. I refer to Canada and the UK, two countries I am very familiar with.

What do you have to do with anything? Just because you do well, or even a hundred thousand do well, has nothing to do with the millions of non-whites sucking down welfare.

Again, if Western nations wished to restrict welfare to the best and brightest, there would be no issues, and immigration would be cut down by over 90%.

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02-17-2016 09:07 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-17-2016 07:46 PM)tynamite Wrote:  
Quote:
Quote:You seem to live in the fantasy that most immigrants coming into Britain and Europe are of the high quality type, when in fact the opposite is true. Statistics reveal that most non-White immigrant classes across the USA and Europe disproportionately consume welfare relative to their White peers. Again, it could all be stopped with a reform of the welfare and immigration system, but the rich elites don't want that.

Your the one living in the fantasy, what video game you playing today.

Please show me these statistics?

I am one of those non-white immigrants you speak of and I live very well, most of us aren't on welfare. I refer to Canada and the UK, two countries I am very familiar with.





Quote:Non-EU immigration linked to unemployment, says report
Research by migration advisory committee suggests link between immigration and employment levels of 'native workers'

[Image: East-European-workers-pic-007.jpg?w=620&...654b5148d8]

The new research challenges the established academic consensus that there has been little or no direct link between immigration and employment levels in Britain.

Immigration to Britain from outside Europe is linked to unemployment in depressed economic times, according to an explosive report from the government's own expert advisers.

The migration advisory committee research published on Tuesday suggests that for every extra 100 non-European migrants who come to Britain, 23 fewer British residents are employed.

The finding directly challenges the established academic consensus that there has been little or no direct link between immigration and employment levels in Britain. It flatly contradicts research from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research published on Monday, which found that even in the recent recession there was no direct impact.

The official research confirms that migration has had no impact on average wages but says that it has increased wages at the top of the wage scale but has lowered wage rates at the bottom.

It says that its conclusion that an increase of 100 additional non-EU migrants may be associated with a reduction in employment of 23 "native workers" is based on an analysis of migration and employment rates over the period 1975 to 2010.

"But this possible displacement should not be assumed to last forever: those migrants who have been in the UK for over five years are not associated with displacement of British-born workers," it adds.

The report from the Home Office-appointed migration advisory committee, however, makes clear that there has been no increase in violent crime levels as a result of recent migration, and the influx of foreign skilled workers may actually have contributed to falling crime levels as they are less likely to commit burglary and other property crime.

In terms of housing, the report estimates that skilled migration from outside Europe will generate demand for an extra 112,000 homes by 2017 – only about 8% of the additional demand for housing within the next five years with – with the effects concentrated in London and other limited parts of Britain.

The report also says recent official assessments of immigration policy that have calculated the cost to the economy of measures such as curbing overseas students should instead measure their impact on the "economic wellbeing" of the resident population rather than their impact on the gross domestic product.

Professor David Metcalf, the chairman of the migration advisory committee, said: "Assessing the impacts of migration is not a simple decision and our conclusions will require careful consideration by the government. However, our research suggests that non-European migration is associated with some displacement of British workers."

Metcalf says 160,000 British-born workers have been displaced by non-EU migrants since 2005. But he added that there was no evidence that European immigration, including Polish, had led to fewer British workers being employed.

The report was commissioned by ministers after a Home Office impact assessment put the cost to the economy of the government's curbs on overseas students at more than £2bn a year.
http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/jan/1...employment

Quote:Migrants DO take our jobs: Britons losing out to foreign workers, says official study

BRITONS are losing out to foreign workers with one in six low-skilled jobs now held by an immigrant.

[Image: immigration08july14-487645.jpg]

Of the UK's 13million low-skilled jobs, 2.1million are held by migrant workers [GETTY]

The number of British-born people in lowly-paid jobs has fallen by more than a million since 1997 – while migrants doing similar work rose by the same amount, official figures show.

A Home Office study published yesterday showed the jobs boom for migrants was fuelled by expansion of the European Union in 2004.

More than half of the new job-holders in ­Britain are eastern Europeans using freedom of movement rules to seek out better wages.

Of the UK’s 13 million low-skilled jobs, in areas such as horticulture and food manufacturing, about 2.1 million are now held by migrants, the report found. Nearly half of them, 840,000, are EU citizens.

Advisers on the Home Office’s Migration Advisory Committee who produced the research have now urged the Government to limit the impact of migration on local communities. And they warned ministers to “think carefully” about how they handle more EU expansion.

Ukip MEP Patrick O’Flynn said: “These figures demonstrate the damaging impact that mass immigration has had on the prospects of ordinary Brits.


These figures demonstrate the damaging impact that mass immigration has had on the prospects of ordinary Brits
Ukip MEP Patrick O’Flynn
“The low-skilled jobs market is now saturated by foreign workers, while communities have had to bear the brunt of this influx that has changed many neighbourhoods beyond recognition.

“We must leave the EU and take back control of Britain’s borders.”

The report said the rise in immigration over the past 15 to 20 years was “heavily influenced” by Labour’s policy of dishing out more work permits, student and family visas.

It found that 75 per cent of the 2.9 million rise in the foreign-born population in the past 10 years was concentrated in just a quarter of towns, leaving them struggling to cope with the pressure on housing and services.

“Although nationally the economic impact of immigration is very modest, the economic and social impact on particular local authorities is much stronger,” the report said.

It states that between 1997 and 2013 the number of Britons in low-skilled jobs fell by 1.1 million, while the number of foreigners in such roles increased by the same amount.

The UK-born share of low-skilled jobs fell from 93 per cent to 84 per cent.

Some experts say a shift by two million Britons into high-skilled work explains this change. But the UK-born share of top-level jobs also fell six per cent to 86 per cent.

The committee raised concerns that migrants from five countries, including Turkey, that are currently negotiating to join the EU would once again find work in low-skilled occupations.

Sir Andrew Green, of Migration Watch UK, said: “One has to ask why some people are so keen to promote mass immigration in the teeth of public opinion.”

A Home Office spokesman said: “In the past, the majority of growth in employment was taken up by foreign nationals. Under this Government, three-quarters of this growth has been accounted for by British citizens.

“We are working across ­Government to ensure immigration works for this country and will use the findings of this report to inform our approach.”
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/487645/...cial-study

Quote:British bosses snub 2.7m jobless to offer work to Romanians

BRITSH bosses are offering thousands of jobs to Romanian workers despite UK unemployment hitting a 17-year high of 2.68million.

[Image: 299091_1.jpg]

As the jobless rate soars to 8.4 per cent, Romanian job-seekers are being snapped up in a recruitment drive that has made the UK the favoured destination for the would-be migrant workers.

In Bucharest yesterday, online recruitment agency tjobs.ro said British firms were trying to fill 2,434 jobs with Romanian workers.

Many posts were for medical staff, tourism workers and skilled staff, but a quarter of them were for labourers and other unskilled workers.

The jobs are just the latest being offered to out-of-work foreigners while their British counterparts are left dependent on the benefits system.

UK posts on offer in Romania included £2,000-a-month cab drivers, nurses on £24,000 a year and doctors offered £4,000 a month. Other jobs included sales staff, care-home assistants and hotel posts. In December alone there were 9,383 applications from Romanians for UK jobs through tjobs.ro.

Many posts were for medical staff, tourism workers and skilled staff, but a quarter of them were for labourers and other unskilled workers.
This made up more than 20 per cent of the total applications. Germany came next, with 6,890 Romanian applications, followed by Denmark with 4,199.

Earlier this month, a report revealed immigrants had taken 160,000 jobs from British-born workers in five years.

One British job was lost for every four non-EU workers arriving here between 2005 and 2010.

The study by the Government’s Migration Advisory Committee revealed the number of foreigners working in the UK had soared by 2.1 million in 15 years. Cheap labour was one of the biggest problems. The startling findings come as youth unemployment in Britain crashes through the one million barrier.

They vindicate warnings the Daily Express has sounded for years on the dangers of the last Labour government’s open-door policy on immigration.

The report makes a mockery of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s pledge to create “British jobs for British workers”.

Sir Andrew Green, chairman of campaign group MigrationWatch UK, said: “The committee have had the courage to say straight out that immigration can add to unemployment, especially during a recession.”

Romanian nurse Sylvia Basescu, who is looking for a job here, said: “Many of my friends have jobs in the UK. They earn great salaries. There is lots of overtime and they can save a lot of money to buy property in Romania and send money back to support their families.”
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/299091/...-Romanians

Quote:Romanians rush for 'Come to UK' jobs

TENS of thousands of Romanians plan to swarm into the UK once visa restrictions are dropped at the end of the year, new figures suggest.

[Image: gypos-440456.jpg]

There are lots of Romanian gypsies living rough in London.

One in three jobs currently advertised with the country’s leading recruiter – 28,577 out of 87,786 – is based in Britain.

The shocking figures provoked concern among campaigners fearing a flood of Romanians and Bulgarians next year when the UK’s labour market and job centres are opened to them.

Experts at Migration Watch believe around 50,000 a year will arrive for the next five years.

Peter Bone, Tory MP for Wellingborough – which already has a huge eastern European population – said: “This is a catastrophe about to happen and we need to stop it. Not only will Britons lose out on work but it will create social tensions.”

[Image: 92438.jpg]

Migration Watch experts believe 250,000 Romanians will arrive in the UK over the next five years.

Not only will Britons lose out on work but it will create social tensions. East Midlands Euro MP Derek Clark of Ukip said: “All of this is on top of the migrants we already have from Romania and Bulgaria, many of whom are living rough on the streets of London and elsewhere.”

Most of the jobs advertised are for skilled staff in healthcare, tourism, agriculture and childcare. But there are adverts for jobs unskilled Britons could do including taxi drivers, trainee managers for a burger chain and care assistants.

Romanians can earn higher wages in this country compared to other EU states, and also get access to Britain’s welfare state and social housing system.

[Image: 92439.jpg]

Romanians will be able to earn more in the UK than in other EU states.

Yesterday in Bucharest, the Romanian capital, locals told how they are already planning to journey to Britain in 2014.

Plumber Munteanu Dumitru, 32, said: “My girlfriend and I have been told there are lots of jobs. Once work restrictions are lifted we hope to go to the UK and make a new life.”

Nurse Gabriela Teodorescu said: “I have seen adverts for jobs in the UK and the pay and conditions are so much better. I think England is a better place to settle and have my family.”
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/440456/...to-UK-jobs

Quote:Migrants mopping up UK jobs?
As spending cuts in the UK force a growing number of people out of work, the few vacancies that are left are mostly going to immigrants.

Jamie Bragginton is among the growing ranks of the unemployed. He has been trying to find a job in social housing since May – but competition is fierce.

"There are around five or six agencies working for each job so you just find there are about 30-40 people getting shortlisted. I’ve had to look at salaries that are slightly less, maybe going back to college, maybe doing something part-time," he says.

Unemployment is now at 8 per cent – the highest for 15 years. But no matter how hard Jamie tries, the odds are stacked against him.

Job centers across the UK have helped fill over 180,000 new vacancies in the last 12 months. But only 8 per cent of those went to British nationals. Foreign workers were more successful in the job market nine times out of 10.

Reversing that trend was a key election pledge of the new government, promising to slash immigration.

However a year on, it has only increased. Net immigration was nearly a quarter of a million last year – up 20 per cent on 2009 and Britain’s second biggest ever annual total. It is way off the government’s five-figure target.

“I think they were probably over-promising. Given the restrictions that they face, it didn’t make sense to promise to bring the number down to an arbitrary level. Really, they should’ve been having a more honest debate with the public about the limits on what they could do,” claims Alex Glennie from the Institute for Public Policy Research.

The government claims its target can be met by capping non-EU immigration. But that ignores the fact that most are coming from within the EU where restrictions do not apply.

Entry numbers for Eastern Europeans rose eightfold in the last year alone as the incomers continued to take advantage of the open borders.

“It’s unlikely the measures they’ve announced will meet that target. They might come close, but they are unlikely to meet it, so we think further measures are necessary,” claims Matt Pollard from Migration Watch.

Others believe that the problem lies at home.

Priti Patel is a Conservative MP and from an immigrant family herself. She knows what it takes to succeed here – but says most do not.

“30-40 years ago, you’ve seen immigrants come to this country. What they want to do is, they want to work hard and get on in life. They really do – they’ve got families to think about, etc, etc. In days gone past, we used to have a tremendous British work ethic in this country and I think we’ve effectively lost some of that,” she says.

As RT’s Ivor Bennett reports, most people at the job centers are migrant workers.

“The problem is a lot of British people at the moment are a bit lazy and they’ve got used to not doing the minimum paid jobs and the low paid work so they need to be forced into taking these jobs,” says Jamie Bragginton.

The government claims it is now doing just that: “We are reforming the welfare system to ensure that we end the benefit dependency which has trapped so many people, and finally ensure work pays.”

But while the long-term unemployed can be forced to look for jobs, there is no guarantee they will get them.Like its pledges on immigration, it looks like another promise the UK government simply cannot keep.

Click the link below to watch a video about it.

https://www.rt.com/news/immigrants-take-uk-jobs-447/

Quote:Does Immigration From EU Countries Cause Unemployment In The UK?

[Image: n-IAIN-DUNCAN-SMITH-THERESA-MAY-large570.jpg]

Did soaring immigration under the last Labour government cost British workers their jobs?

That was the message from Iain Duncan Smith and Theresa May when they unveiled on Monday a decision to ban EU jobseekers from claiming housing benefit.

In a joint article in the Daily Mail, the cabinet ministers wrote: "In just five years between 2005 and 2010, for every British person who fell out of work, almost two foreign nationals gained employment."

Jonathan Portes, director of the National Institute for Social and Economic Research and former Cabinet Office chief economist during that period, disagrees.

"The period of high immigration that began in the late 1990s actually coincided with historically very high employment rates for British-born workers," he told HuffPostUK.

"The mid-2000s saw the highest sustained employment rates in recorded history, and in late 2007, the chances that a Briton of working age was in employment was considerably higher than 10 years earlier."

NIESR's Portes argues employment "fell as a result of the financial crisis and resulting recession, but this had little or nothing to do with immigration."

Atul Hatwal, director of the pro-immigration group Migration Matters, told HuffPostUK: "The implication that migrants took British jobs on an industrial scale is incorrect.

"The government's figures show that from 2005 to 2008 the numbers of Britons in jobs actually rose - by 116,000. This was a period of near full employment in Britain with demand for workers often outstripping supply so it's no surprise that employers turned to migrants to fill the gap. As a result the numbers of migrants in work rose by 660,000.

"It is not the case that migrants and British workers are just competing for the same jobs. In 2008, when migration was at its height, the number of unfilled vacancies was the highest ever recorded at 700,000."

[Image: o-IMMIGRATION-570.jpg]

"From the crash at the end of 2008 to the start of 2010, the government figures show that the numbers of Britons and migrants in work went down - in both cases by 3%."

Ministers are also falling foul of what economists call the "lump of labour fallacy" as they suggest that there is a fixed quantity of work to be done in the UK so any extra workers would reduce the number of jobs available, whereas they actually increase the size of the economy and end up increasing the amount of jobs available.

Duncan Smith and May cite "evidence from the Migration Advisory Committee" in their article to suggest that immigration negatively affects British workers in the Labour market.

However a report from Jonathan Wadsworth, member of the Migration Advisory Committee, shows that "there is little evidence of overall adverse effects of immigration on wages and employment for people born in the UK."

He adds that it is "hard to find evidence of much displacement of UK workers or lower wages... they certainly do not receive preferential access to housing."

It may make political sense for ministers to blame rising unemployment on immigration from the EU, however the economic evidence does not necessarily back that up.
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/01/...32089.html

Quote:There's a reason British youngsters aren't working, Dave. It's called immigration

This is the reason young people are out of work.

I don't know about you, but I'm beginning to wonder how we survived a decade or so ago. If you listened to the likes of David Cameron, it's as if our young people have been a permanent scourge on the state, blood-sucking parasites dragging the nation down. We're bone idle, useless, lack the work ethic and need a good kicking. Hence, Cameron has been forced to look at ruling out unemployment and housing benefits for British youngsters.

Certainly the welfare state in Britain has been too generous and created a culture of dependency and abuse of taxpayers' cash. But that isn't age-specific: there are plenty of fiftysomethings who have dragged five kids up, feeding and clothing them with state money in a house they were given, tuning into Jeremy Kyle on the plasma TV rather than showing any interest in working.

Cameron's desire to bar under-25s from claiming unemployment benefit once again sees the British government turn on our abandoned youth. We are already the generation set to inherit the colossal debt piled up firstly by Labour and now the Coalition and that's bad enough in itself. But the more immediate issue is the one of mass uncontrolled immigration and just how badly it has hurt the prospects of our young – something I've never heard Cameron speak about, let alone act upon.
I meet young people almost every day who feel they have been screwed over by successive governments. They were urged to go to university, to rack up the debt – only to come out and find a labour market flooded with older, more experienced foreign workers and few graduate jobs. The result? Millions of graduates reduced to taking any job they can find after months of graft or in many cases, failing to find one at all. There is also the new sensation of interning for those lucky enough to have the backing of a family who can bankroll them in exchange for experience and contacts, yet another blow against British meritocracy.

Do not buy into the narrative that the jobs are there. In many places, they are not. British builders have been priced out of the market by foreign competitors. How many British workers do you now see in the hotels, restaurants, even in the wards of some NHS hospitals? Employers have started to listen to the politicians' mantra: foreign workers work harder. British youngsters are useless.

The discrimination is subtle but is starting to creep in. Hire an Eastern European if you get the chance, you'll get more bang for your buck. It would be condemned as racist if the opposite were suggested.

The barriers to entry for employment for our young people are being stacked higher and higher by cowardly, conniving politicians insisting that uncontrolled immigration is an economic necessity. In many cases, angry youngsters have given up. The fact that Cameron is seeking to add further misery and hardship to their lives is a disgrace.

Read the comments of this article.
http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/michae...migration/

[Image: _73254069_uk_migration_624_5.gif]

[source]

[Image: _85201805_net_migration_624.png]

[source]

Quote:Some 532,000 people migrated to the UK in the year ending September, up from the 497,000 people who arrived during the previous year, while 320,000 left the country, down from the 343,000 the previous year.

If 500,000 immigrants enter Britain each year, 300,000 people leave each year, and 200,000 people stay - then in five years the population has increased by 1 million due to immigrants. In ten years that's two million. In thirteen years, there will be enough immigrants added to Britain to make up the unemployment rate (not including the people on workfare).

Back in the early 90s and also the 80s, anyone could get a job guaranteed in one week. People used to be able to knock on factories and other workplaces, ask them if they're hiring, and be hired on the spot. Not any more you can't. And we wonder why university graduates face youth unemployment in Europe.

Spain youth unemployment reaches record 56.1%

Quote:Youth unemployment: Fears over record figures

Young people are being "shunted into the sidelines" as they face a growing threat of unemployment, a business group has warned. Andrew Cave, from the Federation of Small Businesses, said the future looked gloomy for the young unemployed. The latest figures showed youth unemployment rose to a fresh record high, with more than one in five 16 to 24-year-olds out of work. Prime Minister David Cameron said the figure was a matter of "great regret".
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12482018

Quote:Youth unemployment hits 1 million
  • UK unemployment rises to 2.62m, a 17-year high
  • Youth unemployment rate at 21.9%
  • Claimant count rises to 1.6 million
  • Employment minister blames the eurozone

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2011...hits-1m-uk

Yes I agree with all that has been said, but ignorant comments were made about no n-white immigrants.

The whole purpose of the EU was to allow the cheaper labour from Eastern Europe to be able to work in places like the UK, without any visas or permits.

Corporate UK has taken advantage of the cheap labour to fatten their pockets. These Corporations are also quicker to hire foreigners, whether they be from Australia or Zambia.

The fact is that a large amount of young Brits leave school with out any skills, many of them don't even go on to post secondary studies. Alot of them will end up even leaving the country for better pastures.

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02-17-2016 09:44 PM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-17-2016 04:37 PM)Samseau Wrote:  This is a flaw with the welfare system itself, not necessarily the people who exploit it. Welfare can be used to promote eugenics or dysgenics, but most politicians prefer the dysgenic solutions since having a voter base elect you for generations so you can keep providing free shit is better than doing the right thing and perhaps only holding office for one cycle.

You gotta understand, the entire system is broken from the top to bottom which promotes such a lazy degenerate lifestyle. The schools suck balls, the lack of good paying jobs due to labor costs falling due to high immigration, the extreme taxation for anyone who does manage to achieve success means that tens of millions of people will never feel like trying in the first place. Welfare becomes more attractive.

Immigration that only lets in the highly qualified is a good thing and I would never object to it. But immigration that focuses on bringing in masses that swell the welfare ranks just so corporations can have some extra slave labor to serve them catered food at lunch break for $8 an hour has no place in any society.

You seem to live in the fantasy that most immigrants coming into Britain and Europe are of the high quality type, when in fact the opposite is true. Statistics reveal that most non-White immigrant classes across the USA and Europe disproportionately consume welfare relative to their White peers. Again, it could all be stopped with a reform of the welfare and immigration system, but the rich elites don't want that.
_____

An excerpt from my first post here which you tried to refute Wrote:I mean you have welfare plans that give more money than minimum wage full time work, combine that with a lazy disposition and a lack of pride and it's no wonder we're getting many individuals who simply opt out of working and shit out children (who are brought up on those exact values).

Immigration is a problem in the UK, but it's not the only problem and definitely not the main cause of it's degradation. The true cause is that our culture encourages lazy people to be lazy, the entitled to be entitled
So in other words we agree, but you misinterpreted my post like I said from the beginning.
(This post was last modified: 02-18-2016 12:25 AM by AntiMediocrity.)
02-18-2016 12:24 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-17-2016 06:20 PM)Requiem Wrote:  The question remains why any country should even consider paying welfare to foreigners. If they haven't worked in the country for at least 10 years straight without support, then they should just have to go back.
But I guess people here know by now that I don't even like qualified immigration. At least not in those numbers and not if it means granting everyone citizenship. European countries are very well able to fill their marked demands with their own people. If supply is really lagging or the quality is lagging, that's a cultural problem and one of the educational system. Nothing that couldn't be fixed inside the country if a fix was really wanted.
I couldn't be more for this. Part of earning temporary residence in Poland-3 months to 5 years-is proving you are not a burden on the welfare system. That could be proving you have work, you have a Polish wife/husband who works, or giving a bank statement to prove you have at least 7500 złoty inside a Polish bank account (about £1300).

I doubt Britain has such a thing in place.

(02-17-2016 08:52 PM)KorbenDallas Wrote:  Your argument for mass displacement level immigration of Britons is, "I'm an immigrant, so, I will be for it, regardless of the effects on the native, and if anyone disagrees with me, they are a xenophobe".

This is insanely self-serving and insulting to native Britons.
If you're referring to me, as I am an immigrant to Poland, my argument is more like "I am a qualified immigrant who is able to support himself, so qualified immigrants in the UK who can support themselves have just as much right to live in the UK as that jobless chain smoking alcoholic with 4 children, and if anyone disagrees I only see the former individual as being ill-favoured because of their nationality which leads me to deduce you are xenophobic."

Trust me I hate using this word as much as anyone here as it's so spammed by the left in recent days, but unfortunately it's the only conclusion I draw.

The only, the only way I concede qualified immigration is an issue is in the context that qualified people could help their host country with it's problems but instead leave it in it's squalor. I think we've all seen that video with the gumballs (I'll embed it on request, if you haven't seen it).
(This post was last modified: 02-18-2016 12:55 AM by AntiMediocrity.)
02-18-2016 12:35 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
I wasn't referring to you, but I also disagree with you.

In Britons case, it revolutionized the world, and built an empire on which the sun never set. I'm pretty sure it can do great things with it's native population.

I don't see a problem with a very small amount of qualified immigration, but your stance that to oppose this is to be "xenophobic" is ridiculous.

It's not xenophobic to have a closed border. I do not think Japanese are xenophobic.

Loving your neighbor, and wanting to live as an ethnic nation state is not xenophobic.

I want no more immigration to America for fifty years except in the case of an American marrying a foreigner.

I'm not xenophobic though. I love people and have a foreign girlfriend.

I'm tired of baseless name calling of nationalists and putting words in our mouths.

RVF should be above that. I didn't read your posts before you just responded to me, and I think your position is reasonable, but I disagree. It's a shame you just resort to name calling.
02-18-2016 02:28 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
(02-18-2016 02:28 AM)KorbenDallas Wrote:  Snip
The first point I'm going to address is your claim of xenophobic to be "name calling". I don't consider it name calling, rather the only word I have for the phenomenon of preferring a native to a non-native simply because they're native regardless of other variables. Perhaps you can provide me with a more appropriate term? Anyway for the sake of a decent discussion, I'll stop using the term here. I'm not here to throw out ad-hominems and I don't want anyone to think that's my intent.

Quote: I'm pretty sure it can do great things with it's native population.

I think you give Brits too much credit. It would take to take things like complete rejection of social media, a return to conservative values, re-establishing gender roles, and a renovation of the welfare system amongst other things to make Britain "Great" again.

Quote:I do not think Japanese are xenophobic.

Good example btw. I too, do not consider them xenophobic. I consider them having a culture that serves their countrymen well, they have good countrymen in turn and letting anyone in has the potential to diminish that. However, UK does not have a culture that serves the countrymen well, and it does not have good countrymen. UK instead has a toxic culture, and mass immigration is not the cause but an effect.

Quote:I want no more immigration to America for fifty years except in the case of an American marrying a foreigner.

And what will that solve? Do you honestly think zero immigration is going to provide an iota of improvement to the US? Immigrants come because of the lifestyle that is presented to them. A lifestyle you propagate, and then choose to boast about. A lifestyle that has resulted in an obesity epidemic, youtubers getting more annual income than a doctor, Kim K being famous for...nothing. "America is the greatest country in the world!", I'm sure you know about Hubris. But we're getting off topic here.

Quote:I'm tired of baseless name calling of nationalists and putting words in our mouths.

I also consider myself a nationalist, but maybe not in the sense you define it. I'm here in Poland, I try my best to speak the language and adhere to the culture. I'm not a native, but I hope 5 years from now I can be considered an honorary one. And likewise I would not try and stop someone from let's say, Brazil going to the UK if they wanted to be fluent in English and adhere to English values.

It seems to me like you would keep me in Britain and keep them in Brazil. Does your GF still live in her native country? If not, would you be affected if she suddenly had to go back and you couldn't leave your country?

I'm not trying to instigate anything here btw, I want to know your stance on the subject as well as I am trying to explain mine.
(This post was last modified: 02-18-2016 04:24 AM by AntiMediocrity.)
02-18-2016 04:04 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
A lot of questions...

First of all, with regards to xenophobia, it has a meaning. You can't just change the meaning because you can't find other words to use. It means dislike of foreigners. Having a no-immigration policy isn't a "dislike of foreigners".

I'm pretty sure asians are smarter on average than Europeans. But if your an African country, that doesn't mean you then just invited in 100 million Asians in to replace your people. Just because a nation might be going through a rough cultural period, a period of decadence or decline, does not give its leaders the right to replace it's population.

No European country, or America, or Australia, has ever gotten to vote on the changes that were made to our immigration policies that have flooded our countries and which depress birth rates due to the depressive effects on wages.

Leaders of nations have a duty to their citizens to serve them first, above non-citizens.

Sending back illegals in America would increase American birth rates, and going through an economic collapse by letting the banks fail along with Family Law reform would straighten out American culture pretty fast.

I'm not sure what your getting at with youtubers making a lot of money. Most don't.



Look, it's great that you are a model immigrant and that you like Poland better than the UK. But this idea that the debate is over the small amount of model immigrants like you is just preposterous.

Britain is arresting British natives for walking through a Muslim part of town. Tommy Robinson just got his head bashed in. Systematic rape of poor young British girls is getting covered up for a DECADE. British people are being decimated by a traitorous elite that is turning a blind eye to the destruction of their culture and safety, and your worried about what?

That people that want to put a moratorium on this are "xenophobic".


Your attitude towards this is defined by your own experience of being an immigrant (which I personally think is a smart individual decision on your part) and possibly you are ill-informed on the gravity of the destruction that is occuring in Britain.


Hopefully, I've gotten through, but I don't know. Britain seems completely lost to me as an outsider in terms of their native population having a chance to retain their nation and culture.
02-18-2016 04:46 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
If I'm not mistaken, xenophobic means "fear of the unknown". It was only extended to disliking foreigners coming to your country in droves as a form of contempt: as though you don't like them just because you haven't got to know them yet. The real term is probably more like "ethnocentric".

The funniest is when people like us are called xenophobic, after massively enjoying foreign countries and cultures for extended periods of time. To leftists, objective reality and clear thinking is an enemy, thus so too are fixed definitions.
02-18-2016 04:52 AM
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RE: R.I.P. London
In case a certain user hasn't blocked me yet, here's a disclaimer: I do not intend to speak on behalf of KorbenDallas, although I think we're on the same page here.

Second disclaimer: After reading my response, it comes off as a little aggressive. - Isn't meant that way!

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  The first point I'm going to address is your claim of xenophobic to be "name calling". I don't consider it name calling
But it still is, you homophobic sexist!

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  , rather the only word I have for the phenomenon of preferring a native to a non-native simply because they're native regardless of other variables. Perhaps you can provide me with a more appropriate term?
1) To "prefer" natives doesn't mean we think better of them simply for being natives compared to foreigners. It's that we don't want the ethnicity of our homelands to be diminished.
2) A more appropriate term would be ethnic nationalist, although I find it ridiculous that it is even necessary to add the word "ethnic". Should be self-evident.

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  I think you give Brits too much credit. It would take to take things like complete rejection of social media, a return to conservative values, re-establishing gender roles, and a renovation of the welfare system amongst other things to make Britain "Great" again.
and
(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  UK does not have a culture that serves the countrymen well, and it does not have good countrymen. UK instead has a toxic culture,
Do you realize what you are suggesting here? The culture of the natives has been corroded by cultural marxists, so you want to replace them with foreigners from countries where the culture either has managed to withstand thus far, or where the standard of living is so low that people simply cannot afford the degeneracy. Do people even think a few decades into the future or are short-term "solutions" the new intellectual benchmark? Once the foreigners have a fairly high standard of living and were exposed to the toxicity for long enough, they too will end up like the degenerate natives. Not all, of course - just like not every native is degenerate. It's just a growing problem.
The issue needs to be fixed by natives, with natives and inside the country.

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  and mass immigration is not the cause but an effect.
The degeneracy of the culture is vastly influenced by media and politics. Politics are primarily responsible for mass-immigration, not the native population as such. So immigration is not an effect (not the [only] cause either) of the bad culture, but a promoting factor.

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  
Quote:I want no more immigration to America for fifty years except in the case of an American marrying a foreigner.
And what will that solve? Do you honestly think zero immigration is going to provide an iota of improvement to the US?
Yes. The US has massive problems with culture and race. If instead of sorting that out first before importing even more of it, they're headed towards decline.

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  I'm here in Poland, I try my best to speak the language and adhere to the culture. I'm not a native, but I hope 5 years from now I can be considered an honorary one.
You'll never be a Pole, not in a hundred years, no matter what is written on your passport or how fluent you speak the language. That's a fact.

(02-18-2016 04:04 AM)AntiMediocrity Wrote:  It seems to me like you would keep me in Britain and keep them in Brazil. Does your GF still live in her native country? If not, would you be affected if she suddenly had to go back and you couldn't leave your country?

It's not about forbidding people to leave their countries. Where did that come from? You can visit other countries, not problem. You can even work there as long as the native population doesn't lose jobs over it. But "naturalizing" people is a different thing entirely. Natives are natives and foreigners should only be allowed to live in a foreign country for as long as they bring a benefit for the natives.
(This post was last modified: 02-18-2016 05:18 AM by Requiem.)
02-18-2016 04:56 AM
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