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DIY Car Repair
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AboveAverageJoe Offline
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Post: #1
DIY Car Repair
Car ownership and repair have become prohibitively expensive. Most car problems can be solved with a little kno-how, the right tools, and the confidence to take your car apart knowing you can put it all together again. This thread is where car owners who do their own repairs or just want an experts opinion on a particular car issue can post a question. I have been in the car auction for 15 years and I have been tinkering with motors since I was 15 years old. I do all my own work on all the cars I buy and sell. If anyone has car questions or needs advice on repair or purchase or just general automotive information, I would be glad to avail my expertise. Obviously other experienced mechanics are invited to chime in even if we disagree.
No question too big or to small.
(This post was last modified: 09-24-2016 02:27 PM by AboveAverageJoe.)
09-24-2016 02:25 PM
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General Stalin Offline
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Post: #2
RE: DIY Car Repair
I do my own backyard repair and have been wrenching for years as well. I don't consider myself any sort of expert at all and generally just google shit that is wrong and follow instructions, crack open a Chilton manual, whatever.

Anyway I have a 2007 GMC Yukon Denali that makes a loud POP sound most of the time when I make a sharp turn from a stop with the wheel cut. Sounds like it's coming from the front driver's side wheel. Sounds like a typical CV axle issue, but I installed a brand new driver's side CV axle last year and it still makes the sound. I suppose I could try changing the passenger-side as well but wondering if anyone think's it could be something else like a pitman arm or some shit like that.

It's only when the wheel is cut all the way and it's only when moving from a stop. Only pops once. Like I said, really just sounds like a CV axle binding up.
09-24-2016 02:42 PM
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AboveAverageJoe Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Yeah, usually CV axles make more of a clicking sound when they fail. Usually CV's make noise when turning one way and not the other. Could be control arm, tie rod ends, or sway bar links, possibly even your power steering rack. Some cars like my BMW 740IL have two control arms. Did you use a quality OEM part or the cheapest axle you could find?
09-24-2016 02:54 PM
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lex the impaler Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
I've got a 4th Gen eclipse, and I have this weird clicking noise from the driver rear tire during breaking. When I slow down using the brakes, it makes the noise, almost like the brakes are grabbing but there's a cyclical timing to it. Thought it was the wheel bearing, but it makes no noise during normal driving. I just had he brakes done last year, I think I got hosed on that job.

David took his men with him and went out and killed two hundred Philistines and brought back their foreskins. They counted out the full number to the king so that David might become the king's son-in-law. Then Saul gave him his daughter Michal in marriage. 1 Samuel 18:27
09-24-2016 04:06 PM
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General Stalin Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
(09-24-2016 02:54 PM)AboveAverageJoe Wrote:  Did you use a quality OEM part or the cheapest axle you could find?

I used a cheapo Autozone axle, but I read reviews and watched videos where they said the Duralast axle was surprisingly a good quality part for the cost. I don't think the replacement axle is the issue as it did not solve the issue. I mean it was a part that was good to replace but it wasn't the problem. Wondering if there is a way I can easily check what steering component that could be instead of blowing all kinds of money rebuilding the entire driver's side steering assembly.
09-24-2016 04:28 PM
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ms224 Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
(09-24-2016 04:06 PM)lex the impaler Wrote:  I've got a 4th Gen eclipse, and I have this weird clicking noise from the driver rear tire during breaking. When I slow down using the brakes, it makes the noise, almost like the brakes are grabbing but there's a cyclical timing to it. Thought it was the wheel bearing, but it makes no noise during normal driving. I just had he brakes done last year, I think I got hosed on that job.

Is it your parking brake? Or possibly some corrosion on the rotor?

Try going real slow in the parking lot and pull up on the parking brake a bit, do you hear anything?

Alternatively one of your rotors maybe slightly warped and out of round.
09-24-2016 04:41 PM
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el mechanico Offline
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Post: #7
RE: DIY Car Repair
(09-24-2016 04:06 PM)lex the impaler Wrote:  I've got a 4th Gen eclipse, and I have this weird clicking noise from the driver rear tire during breaking. When I slow down using the brakes, it makes the noise, almost like the brakes are grabbing but there's a cyclical timing to it. Thought it was the wheel bearing, but it makes no noise during normal driving. I just had he brakes done last year, I think I got hosed on that job.
Warped rotor homie. Lube the caliper slides good when you change it.
09-24-2016 07:18 PM
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Vaun Offline
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Post: #8
RE: DIY Car Repair
Is this even possible anymore? I grew up watching my dad in the garage keep our Skylark, Cutlass and LTD in driving shape. Todays cars seem built to be only repaired by real techs, with specialized tools. What can you possibly repair on a new car these days?
09-24-2016 08:21 PM
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ms224 Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Um, no they are still built out of pretty much the same nuts, bolts, and the like.

You might need a code reader but there are USB ones available.

Most of your common stuff you can do in your driveway with only a few hand tools.

If anything I would say its easier because you can search for symptoms specific to your car on the forums.
09-24-2016 09:03 PM
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lex the impaler Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Thanks for the tips. Will have it checked out.

David took his men with him and went out and killed two hundred Philistines and brought back their foreskins. They counted out the full number to the king so that David might become the king's son-in-law. Then Saul gave him his daughter Michal in marriage. 1 Samuel 18:27
09-24-2016 10:39 PM
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RatInTheWoods Offline
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Post: #11
RE: DIY Car Repair
DIY is the way to go, I am a trades person but I often dabble on other trades.

You can google stuff now thats amazing info and expert help is a click away.

As long as you can use basic tools and be careful I think its manly to be fixing shit up
09-25-2016 12:34 AM
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AboveAverageJoe Offline
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Post: #12
RE: DIY Car Repair
(09-24-2016 04:06 PM)lex the impaler Wrote:  I've got a 4th Gen eclipse, and I have this weird clicking noise from the driver rear tire during breaking. When I slow down using the brakes, it makes the noise, almost like the brakes are grabbing but there's a cyclical timing to it. Thought it was the wheel bearing, but it makes no noise during normal driving. I just had he brakes done last year, I think I got hosed on that job.
Is that a RWD or AWD vehicle?
09-25-2016 09:18 AM
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AboveAverageJoe Offline
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Post: #13
RE: DIY Car Repair
(09-24-2016 04:28 PM)General Stalin Wrote:  
(09-24-2016 02:54 PM)AboveAverageJoe Wrote:  Did you use a quality OEM part or the cheapest axle you could find?

I used a cheapo Autozone axle, but I read reviews and watched videos where they said the Duralast axle was surprisingly a good quality part for the cost. I don't think the replacement axle is the issue as it did not solve the issue. I mean it was a part that was good to replace but it wasn't the problem. Wondering if there is a way I can easily check what steering component that could be instead of blowing all kinds of money rebuilding the entire driver's side steering assembly.

Never, ever, ever use Duralast parts. Most mechanics won't even warrantee their work if you bring them Duralast parts. Next time try to get an OEM or remanufactured part. Only buy fluids at Autozone, never parts. Walmart actually has the cheapest fluids.
09-25-2016 09:21 AM
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AboveAverageJoe Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
(09-24-2016 09:03 PM)ms224 Wrote:  Um, no they are still built out of pretty much the same nuts, bolts, and the like.

You might need a code reader but there are USB ones available.

Most of your common stuff you can do in your driveway with only a few hand tools.

If anything I would say its easier because you can search for symptoms specific to your car on the forums.

I recommend everyone who owns a car to own an ELM 327 and Torque Pro. ELM 327 is a bluetooth OBD-II reader and Torque is the app that goes with it. It is better than many hand held scanners under $200 for about $10. This unit is available on Amazon and E-bay.

For someone that wants more than reading and clearing codes, I recommend CRP-123, made by Launch. It can do transmission and ABS codes, which no other scanner in that ($150) price range do. It is also available on Amazon. One thing that the Torque app can do is read O2 sensor waveforms in real time, which helps because many different problems can set off O2 sensor codes.
09-25-2016 09:27 AM
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Razgriz Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Even if the newest cars need special techs to work on them. Plenty of us have older vehicles and the knowledge of how to keep them running is extremely valuable. I'm oftener surprised at the amount of videos on YouTube. I punched in 02 Nissan Frontier passenger side valve cover gasket repair and lo and behold a video came up of someone doing that exact repair. So do yourself a favor and get a basic set of auto hand tools and dive in.
09-25-2016 05:01 PM
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AboveAverageJoe Offline
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Post: #16
RE: DIY Car Repair
Harbor freight has very cheap, yet decent tools that will hold up for any DIY-selfer. As well as many youtube videos and forums for your specific vehicle. Google is your friend. The forums are golden, often you can find someone who has done the exact repair you need done and has provided a write-up with pictures and neccessary tools.

I feel the biggest stumbling block most people have is their confidence level. People are afraid of taking their car apart and being unable to put it back together again. That is understandable, which is why reading about another non-professional doing the job will give you confidence. I liken it to cooking, once you start doing it you realize it is not so complicated, just more about having the right tools and following the proper steps.

At the least, every man should be able to change his oil, spark plugs, brake pads, and fluids. Once you start with the basics and get your hands dirty your confidence will increase and so will the difficulty level of the jobs you feel are within your purview.

Another way to learn is going to a pick-n-pull junkyard to get your parts. You can learn how to properly do the job first by removing the part there. If you break something or have trouble at least its not your car that you are learning on.
09-25-2016 05:25 PM
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Guitarman Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Simplest DIY you can do to keep your car running reliably is to learn how to change the oil and filter, and while you're at it, change the air filter each year as well (often needs no tools at all for the air filter!). This alone (annual oil and filter changes) will keep your car healthy for a long time. If you are wise enough to be driving a Toyota, that is all you will need to do most years.
09-25-2016 06:08 PM
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flanders Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Not sure if right thread, but I have a mechanical issue with my older 2000s era toyota.

It seems to drive OK but it's throwing a fair number of codes (P0171, P0125, P0130, P0133) that lead me to believe it may have a leaky or faulty intake manifold gasket.

Since yesterday I've been driving around with the heat cranked up (which is murder in july lol) on the off chance the engine decides to overheat.

I have wrenches and shit and ordered some parts off the internet but they probably won't show up for another few days. Is it OK for me to drive this to work for another hundred miles or so over the next few days or should I try to ask coworkers for rides? Thanks, Flanders.
(This post was last modified: 07-14-2019 03:57 AM by flanders.)
07-14-2019 03:55 AM
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Sooth Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Does it use coolant and is there any milky condensation under the oil cap? Is there any oil in the coolant?

Pull the dipstick out, is the oil milky?
(This post was last modified: 07-14-2019 04:13 AM by Sooth.)
07-14-2019 04:12 AM
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flanders Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
I'll check the coolant when the car is cold but the oil looks like regular oil. It doesnt seem to idle poorly either.
07-14-2019 04:16 AM
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Sooth Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
What do the codes translate to exactly?

Does the car have any bad symptoms at all?

Codes are stored forever until they are cleared, and can often be false positives that hang around for years.
07-14-2019 04:49 AM
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Tex Cruise Offline
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Post: #22
RE: DIY Car Repair
Has the car actually been overheating or are you just concerned it might? If the codes suggest a leaking intake manifold then it's probably that or another vacuum issue in the intake which shouldn't affect temperature.

(01-19-2016 11:26 PM)ordinaryleastsquared Wrote:  I stand by my analysis.
07-14-2019 05:12 AM
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flanders Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
Ill reply more soon but I cleared the codes after checking and they showed up again right away. It seems to run at a normal temperature.

Theyre all faulty o2 sensor, engine hesitation, thermostat, etc codes that suggested something upstream was making it run lean. P0171 is 'engine running lean' I think, which likely means too much air since if its a bad fuel pump my guess is it wouldnt start at all, or it would run like complete shit.
07-14-2019 05:44 AM
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Nineteen84 Offline
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Post: #24
RE: DIY Car Repair
Try cleaning the MAF sensor.
07-14-2019 07:52 AM
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flanders Offline
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RE: DIY Car Repair
OK so full list of codes are as follows. It doesn't seem to have any bad symptoms (like odd surges in acceleration or weird idling). Maybe it's just minor right now and slowly getting worse. I'm not sure.

P0171 - 'Car hesitation' - likely leaking intake manifold gasket. Scotty Kilmer says these are a known issue with a 2000s corolla.

P0125 - Insufficient Coolant Temperature - could be bad thermostat or low coolant. Coolant is not low, so I ordered a thermostat (along with an O2 sensor). Not going to bother cleaning an O2 sensor with gasoline since it's probably completely shot.

P0171 (listed twice for some reason)

P0130 - O2 Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Bank1, Sensor 1)

P0133 - O2 Sensor Slow Response

I'll probably limp it to work tomorrow and try to schedule an uber for the next few work days but if any of you car guys think I should just park it and wait for parts then let me know. Thanks for the advice guys I'll check out the MAF sensor when I can get all the other shit taken apart.

(09-25-2016 09:27 AM)AboveAverageJoe Wrote:  
(09-24-2016 09:03 PM)ms224 Wrote:  Um, no they are still built out of pretty much the same nuts, bolts, and the like.

You might need a code reader but there are USB ones available.

Most of your common stuff you can do in your driveway with only a few hand tools.

If anything I would say its easier because you can search for symptoms specific to your car on the forums.

I recommend everyone who owns a car to own an ELM 327 and Torque Pro. ELM 327 is a bluetooth OBD-II reader and Torque is the app that goes with it. It is better than many hand held scanners under $200 for about $10. This unit is available on Amazon and E-bay.

For someone that wants more than reading and clearing codes, I recommend CRP-123, made by Launch. It can do transmission and ABS codes, which no other scanner in that ($150) price range do. It is also available on Amazon. One thing that the Torque app can do is read O2 sensor waveforms in real time, which helps because many different problems can set off O2 sensor codes.

Huh. I'll have to order that. I don't want my transmission to go to shit without a good heads up.
(This post was last modified: 07-14-2019 05:00 PM by flanders.)
07-14-2019 04:59 PM
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