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Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
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wi30 Offline
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Post: #151
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(04-21-2019 04:26 AM)Alpha_Ambitionz Wrote:  
(03-05-2019 11:02 PM)Alpha_Ambitionz Wrote:  Thanks for the advice guys.

I just made an account on Angels and will be playing around on the website more later.

I just started this real estate job in January, so I don't want to leave just yet. I want to show that I can be successful at setting up appointments first.

Once I prove myself, I'll have a good reference to go along with my successful track record and then I can leverage that experience to get a better sales job.

So I've made over 10,000 phone calls since I started. Setup 43 appointments so far.

None of them have closed yet.

It sucks when your commission is based on someone else's ability to close.

I'm also only 3 months into the job, but I'm already starting to feel really burnt out.

Like I literally say the same thing over and over again: "Hi this is AA from the Real Estate Group. You just signed up on our website... how can we help you with your real estate needs?"

Starting to wonder if sales is really for me...

Find a different company if your commission is only paid when someone else closes a sale.

Most lead generation positions get credit and get paid once an appointment or call is successfully set and completed by a sales rep.
(This post was last modified: 04-21-2019 10:09 AM by wi30.)
04-21-2019 10:09 AM
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ChicagoFire Offline
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Post: #152
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(04-21-2019 04:26 AM)Alpha_Ambitionz Wrote:  
(03-05-2019 11:02 PM)Alpha_Ambitionz Wrote:  Thanks for the advice guys.

I just made an account on Angels and will be playing around on the website more later.

I just started this real estate job in January, so I don't want to leave just yet. I want to show that I can be successful at setting up appointments first.

Once I prove myself, I'll have a good reference to go along with my successful track record and then I can leverage that experience to get a better sales job.

So I've made over 10,000 phone calls since I started. Setup 43 appointments so far.

None of them have closed yet.

It sucks when your commission is based on someone else's ability to close.

I'm also only 3 months into the job, but I'm already starting to feel really burnt out.

Like I literally say the same thing over and over again: "Hi this is AA from the Real Estate Group. You just signed up on our website... how can we help you with your real estate needs?"

Starting to wonder if sales is really for me...

B2C isn't where it's at. You want to shoot for B2B and even then I have a friend who does this and he hasn't sold in months. It's posts like this that makes me thankful that I didn't get hired at startups, car dealerships, or Yelp where I inevitably would post about me wanting to rip my hair out. Hang in there buddy.

(09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
04-21-2019 03:02 PM
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Graft Offline
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Post: #153
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
I was explaining to another forum member how you can make a ton of money in tech sales.

The amount of money you make is basically determined by the sales compensation team, financial guys. They look at accounts you have, calculate their average yearly spend, and determine what your quota should be based on the historical performance within those accounts.

Companies want to pay reps from 200-300k but nothing above that. So they try to set the quota to be a slight increase from the past performance. Enough to motivate the rep, but low enough so that he'll hit his number and not leave to another company after 6 months.

In sales there are different types of accounts. Some are "named," which typically means larger accounts that have been with the company for a while. You won't have to cold call and hustle to get in, but this means that the sales compensation team has a pretty good idea of what they are going to spend each year. The only way to make a ton of money is to find a huge, out of the norm deal within these named accounts. Enterprise reps usually have 1-50 named accounts.

Then there are "whitespace accounts." These are accounts with minimal to no spend with the company, so the sales compensation team won't give you a high number because there's no historical performance. So if you penetrate the accounts and close deals you'll be able to beat the numbers easily and get into your accelerators.

A lot of guys are "enterprise named accounts or die" because it's less risk and you're pretty much guaranteed to make 200-300k without doing prospecting bitchwork. But if you get a mid-market job with a good comp plan, you can make more money because more of the accounts are whitespace, so the sales comp team won't give you a high number.

The way to really make a lot of money in tech sales is with a combination of whitespace accounts, luck, and a good comp plan with accelerators. Accelerators are where you really make your money. A good company will give you 3-5x commission after you hit your quota. So if you sell double your quota, or 200% to goal, then you'll get 4-6x your on target commission. 500-700k total comp.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
(This post was last modified: 05-02-2019 12:28 AM by Graft.)
05-02-2019 12:25 AM
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ChicagoFire Offline
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Post: #154
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
Everybody needs to listen to this. I'm going to relisten to it. When I listen to gold like this I'm halfway towards jumping into the deepend and quitting my job to really make a living. The interview subject makes a living flipping cars. If you like Art of the Deal by Donald Trump and Sandler's Can't Teach a Kid to Ride a Bike to a Seminar you'll love this:
https://www.tropicalmba.com/artofthedeal/

Quote:The other part of this conversation is that I know myself. I know myself well enough to know where I can be successful and where I can't, and I fear institutions. I can't do anything that requires me to show up every single day. I've never been successful at that.

Quote:One thing that's really clear with this process, and with Corey, is 'go make a deal' number one and then, number two, be comfortable being uncomfortable.

For about a month I've been trying to crack the nonprofit market while I'm sitting around in the oil fields. I can't for the life of me get key people to respond to me. One of the things I learned through the interview is even though I'm willing to help people communication is a 2 way street and that on top of working for free (lowballing) these motherfuckers don't respond. Only caveat I've encountered is military non-profits. We know who's getting help Wink

(09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
(This post was last modified: 05-03-2019 04:29 PM by ChicagoFire.)
05-03-2019 03:37 PM
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Post: #155
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
Thanks OP, for this really great thread. Read through the whole thing.

Question: I'm in California, and looking to land an SDR/BDR tech sales job. I assume it will be relatively easy to do with all the startups.

My problem: I don't have any prior experience in sales and do not have a degree. Will this hurt or prevent me? Should I just fake it on my CV or will they verify/confirm? Thanks.
(This post was last modified: 05-04-2019 09:45 AM by sittinpretty2020.)
05-04-2019 09:44 AM
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ChicagoFire Offline
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Post: #156
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
https://www.tropicalmba.com/artofthedeal/

^^^
I still recommending listening to this. The guy's enthusiasm for making deals rubs off on you. For example he would talk about how he paid $100 in Uber fees just for the possibility of being the first buyer for a car only to find out it was a piece of shit. What I'm about to tell you all is a way to make some cash over the weekend. No need to go to school, pay for thousands on equipment, no filling out job interviews, etc. Just hustle and know what you sell like the back of your hand. Like any business how you execute is all that matters. For that guy that made 10,000 calls consider doing this:

Next weekend I plan on selling goods I buy wholesale door to door (B2C). Since I have no boss I take all the liabilities but also the profits. Eventually I will scale up to selling B2B and crossing state lines but like they say execute a plan ruthless instead of planning meticulously.

If I make more than my current job I might quit and focus on this instead.

(09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
05-04-2019 04:38 PM
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Thrill Jackson Offline
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Post: #157
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
I think the elephant in the room is how often do tech companies find out sales reps are on 'hate' websites and fire them? That what worries me most day to day.

Growth Over Everything Else.
05-09-2019 09:27 PM
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redbeard Offline
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Post: #158
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
How often do you go showing your employer your browser history?

Be smart, keep quiet, and you’ll be fine. Just like any job...except with sales, you’re building a skill that’ll last you a lifetime.

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05-09-2019 10:28 PM
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Thrill Jackson Offline
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Post: #159
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
^ I think employers can pay ISPs to see what we browse for us now. Nonetheless no use to worry about it I guess.

Always good to have a backup plan though regardless. Layoffs do happen.

Growth Over Everything Else.
05-09-2019 10:47 PM
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redbeard Offline
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Post: #160
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-09-2019 10:47 PM)Thrill Jackson Wrote:  ^ I think employers can pay ISPs to see what we browse for us now. Nonetheless no use to worry about it I guess.

Always good to have a backup plan though regardless. Layoffs do happen.

VPN is your friend

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05-10-2019 07:02 AM
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Graft Offline
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Post: #161
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-04-2019 09:44 AM)sittinpretty2020 Wrote:  Thanks OP, for this really great thread. Read through the whole thing.

Question: I'm in California, and looking to land an SDR/BDR tech sales job. I assume it will be relatively easy to do with all the startups.

My problem: I don't have any prior experience in sales and do not have a degree. Will this hurt or prevent me? Should I just fake it on my CV or will they verify/confirm? Thanks.

Unfortunately man I think not having a degree is going to hurt you a lot. Good tech companies have tons of resumes thrown their way so they can pretty much null anyone who doesn't have a degree.

I have seen successful reps in the industry without a bachelors degree but they had to take a long and unorthodox route to get to where they were at, probably a much longer route than completing a 4 year degree and starting from there.

You basically have to get a smaller company to take a chance on you for an entry level gig and perform well enough to get to a higher level job. Once you perform well there you'll have to network into a larger tech company, but the odds are against you as this is hard enough to do with a bachelors degree.

Companies have a lot to risk by taking people without a bachelors degree. Not only do they risk someone who can't complete a four year degree/party, but they tarnish the brand and prestige of the position. If competitive grads from top schools start hearing that their colleagues didn't get bachelors degrees, they will feel stupid and question why they didn't go into finance/consulting/law like the other "smart kids." People like to feel like they are surrounded with colleagues from competitive and prestigious backgrounds and tech sales is no different.

My advice is to not even look at F1000 tech companies and look for startups who are known to hire people without degrees. Try to be a rockstar there for 5-10 years before you consider a lateral move. However always keep trying for a degree part time as you are currently pretty much fucked for any sort of management or VP position.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
05-13-2019 06:51 PM
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redbeard Offline
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Post: #162
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
Co-sign with Graft. One of the best SDR’s at my company doesn’t have a degree, but he’s 31 and spent the past few years bouncing through various sales jobs, busting hump, and proving that he’s worth the job.

It’s possible, but an uphill battle.

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05-13-2019 09:09 PM
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Graft Offline
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Post: #163
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-13-2019 09:09 PM)redbeard Wrote:  Co-sign with Graft. One of the best SDR’s at my company doesn’t have a degree, but he’s 31 and spent the past few years bouncing through various sales jobs, busting hump, and proving that he’s worth the job.

It’s possible, but an uphill battle.

And after all that he's a 31 year old SDR.

Unfortunately I've seen a lot of guys even with bachelor's degrees bouncing through various sales jobs looking for that break. This is why I'd rather be an SDR at a major co where I know I'll be in the field in 3 years rather than an inside rep at a no name with no field presence looking to grab a coveted field spot at any company.

Early in your career that brand is important and pretty much sets the tone for the rest of your career. Guys have to understand that this is a risky business and a lot of sales jobs are shit with high turnover. Make a few missteps with gigs that last less than a year and all of a sudden you're looking for your fourth job in three years which looks poor on a resume.

I got to the field in a major co pretty young but my career looks completely different than a guy who started at one fresh out of college. I'm still fighting for that senior level enterprise role while guys my age are 2-4 years into that job and getting management jobs.

I'm happy with the way my life turned out so far but I can definitely say that if I was reading my posts on this forum five years ago my career would be skyrocketing.

Regarding faking your CV and college degree: it depends. All the advice on the internet says not to to it because you could lose your job if you're found out. This makes sense if you actually have a career to lose. I'm not willing to lie on my CV right now but when I was busting ass trying to get entry level gigs that I know I'd stay for 1-2 years then I was willing to do whatever it took to get in the door. Once in a while smaller companies won't actually check and if you gotta put food on the table then do what you have to do.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
(This post was last modified: 05-13-2019 09:41 PM by Graft.)
05-13-2019 09:29 PM
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redbeard Offline
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Post: #164
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-13-2019 09:29 PM)Graft Wrote:  This is why I'd rather be an SDR at a major co where I know I'll be in the field in 3 years rather than an inside rep at a no name with no field presence looking to grab a coveted field spot at any company.

Could you elaborate on this a bit more? i.e. what to look for in a company/position/territory.

As most of you know, I'm currently an SDR. I want to make sure that when I land AE, I'm not at a company that's going nowhere (whether that's my current company or not). That way I can build my rolodex and avoid jumping from job to job.

I think this thread has talked a lot about how to get the job, but not so much what makes a job.

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(This post was last modified: 05-13-2019 10:27 PM by redbeard.)
05-13-2019 10:22 PM
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Graft Offline
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Post: #165
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-13-2019 10:22 PM)redbeard Wrote:  
(05-13-2019 09:29 PM)Graft Wrote:  This is why I'd rather be an SDR at a major co where I know I'll be in the field in 3 years rather than an inside rep at a no name with no field presence looking to grab a coveted field spot at any company.

Could you elaborate on this a bit more? i.e. what to look for in a company/position/territory.

As most of you know, I'm currently an SDR. I want to make sure that when I land AE, I'm not at a company that's going nowhere (whether that's my current company or not). That way I can build my rolodex and avoid jumping from job to job.

I think this thread has talked a lot about how to get the job, but not so much what makes a job.

I've talked a lot about this. I made a list of what I felt were first tier and second tier tech companies which are great to start a career.

When you start a job you're basically looking at Linkedin to see how long SDRs get promoted and what kind of turnover the past reps had.

You always want to think about exit options and what kind of companies will scoop you up once you leave. You can use Linkedin to find out where the reps went after that.

Say you work for a company called Kamatera, a small no name IaaS provider. You're able to get to a closing role and make a pretty good name for yourself, but the company probably doesn't have great future in itself. But you see that the main competitors in the space are Amazon Web, Microsoft, Google, and IBM. You could leverage your highly sought after domain experience from that and interview at one of the big boys.

This is different than working at a niche software company with a small market which won't give you any transferrable technology knowledge.

On the other side, if you get into a big company you learn a whole host of different technologies which can be transferred to so many smaller competitors trying to take market share. This valuable skill and brand experience gives you a lot of leverage and these companies should pay you a shit load to leave.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
05-13-2019 11:11 PM
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Alpha_Ambitionz Offline
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Post: #166
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-13-2019 09:29 PM)Graft Wrote:  
(05-13-2019 09:09 PM)redbeard Wrote:  Co-sign with Graft. One of the best SDR’s at my company doesn’t have a degree, but he’s 31 and spent the past few years bouncing through various sales jobs, busting hump, and proving that he’s worth the job.

It’s possible, but an uphill battle.

And after all that he's a 31 year old SDR.

Unfortunately I've seen a lot of guys even with bachelor's degrees bouncing through various sales jobs looking for that break. This is why I'd rather be an SDR at a major co where I know I'll be in the field in 3 years rather than an inside rep at a no name with no field presence looking to grab a coveted field spot at any company.

Early in your career that brand is important and pretty much sets the tone for the rest of your career. Guys have to understand that this is a risky business and a lot of sales jobs are shit with high turnover. Make a few missteps with gigs that last less than a year and all of a sudden you're looking for your fourth job in three years which looks poor on a resume.

I got to the field in a major co pretty young but my career looks completely different than a guy who started at one fresh out of college. I'm still fighting for that senior level enterprise role while guys my age are 2-4 years into that job and getting management jobs.

I'm happy with the way my life turned out so far but I can definitely say that if I was reading my posts on this forum five years ago my career would be skyrocketing.

Regarding faking your CV and college degree: it depends. All the advice on the internet says not to to it because you could lose your job if you're found out. This makes sense if you actually have a career to lose. I'm not willing to lie on my CV right now but when I was busting ass trying to get entry level gigs that I know I'd stay for 1-2 years then I was willing to do whatever it took to get in the door. Once in a while smaller companies won't actually check and if you gotta put food on the table then do what you have to do.

It seems pretty hard to get into a major company though.

For example, I just googled "SDR jobs Vancouver" and here are some examples of companies that are currently hiring:

XenCall: an intelligent software that predicts which lead is most likely to close and which agent is most likely to close it.

PhotoSat: provides a highly accurate satellite surveying service catered towards engineers, geologists, and oil/gas companies.

Procurify: a software that allows companies to better track and manage their spending.

Quoter: allows your company to create professional-looking sales proposals quickly and efficiently.

I have lots of telemarketing and inside sales experience, so I could probably get hired at one of these companies if I tried, but I have many concerns, mainly:

1. I don't have any technical knowledge.

I've sold knives, anti-aging skin creams, got people to donate to charities, setup appointments for realtors, but my technical knowledge is close to zero. I majored in psychology, so you could say that I'm pretty "retarded" when it comes to technology.

2. I'm scared of failing and job hopping until I'm 30.

There's a reason most SDR jobs have a high turn-over rate: it's incredibly easy to burn out from the repetitive nature of the job and the constant rejection that it entails.

I'm turning 25 this year and quite frankly, I'm tired of hopping from job to job, making money, but not really progressing into any suitable career.

If I get a job as an SDR and I get fired for not setting up enough qualified appointments, then what am I to do? Keep trying to get another SDR job until I find one that I succeed at? What if I never succeed?

These are some of my biggest fears when it comes to pursuing a career in sales.
(This post was last modified: 05-14-2019 01:14 AM by Alpha_Ambitionz.)
05-14-2019 12:45 AM
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redbeard Offline
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Post: #167
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
Graft thank you again for all of your help.

I dug in the thread and found your list of top tier companies:

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-60173-page-5.html

Quote:Top enterprise tech companies in my opinion are:

First tier:
-Oracle
-Cisco
-Salesforce
-SAP
-Microsoft
-Amazon Web Services
-Vmware
-IBM
-Symantec
-Dell EMC
-HPE

2nd Tier (not necessarily worse, just smaller/more specialized)
-SAS
-Google (Cloud)
-Citrix
-Red Hat
-Adobe
-Netsuite
-Informatica
-TIBCO
-Workday
-Splunk
-Cloudera
-Infor
-Box
-Dropbox

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05-14-2019 07:27 AM
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Post: #168
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-14-2019 12:45 AM)Alpha_Ambitionz Wrote:  
(05-13-2019 09:29 PM)Graft Wrote:  
(05-13-2019 09:09 PM)redbeard Wrote:  Co-sign with Graft. One of the best SDR’s at my company doesn’t have a degree, but he’s 31 and spent the past few years bouncing through various sales jobs, busting hump, and proving that he’s worth the job.

It’s possible, but an uphill battle.

And after all that he's a 31 year old SDR.

Unfortunately I've seen a lot of guys even with bachelor's degrees bouncing through various sales jobs looking for that break. This is why I'd rather be an SDR at a major co where I know I'll be in the field in 3 years rather than an inside rep at a no name with no field presence looking to grab a coveted field spot at any company.

Early in your career that brand is important and pretty much sets the tone for the rest of your career. Guys have to understand that this is a risky business and a lot of sales jobs are shit with high turnover. Make a few missteps with gigs that last less than a year and all of a sudden you're looking for your fourth job in three years which looks poor on a resume.

I got to the field in a major co pretty young but my career looks completely different than a guy who started at one fresh out of college. I'm still fighting for that senior level enterprise role while guys my age are 2-4 years into that job and getting management jobs.

I'm happy with the way my life turned out so far but I can definitely say that if I was reading my posts on this forum five years ago my career would be skyrocketing.

Regarding faking your CV and college degree: it depends. All the advice on the internet says not to to it because you could lose your job if you're found out. This makes sense if you actually have a career to lose. I'm not willing to lie on my CV right now but when I was busting ass trying to get entry level gigs that I know I'd stay for 1-2 years then I was willing to do whatever it took to get in the door. Once in a while smaller companies won't actually check and if you gotta put food on the table then do what you have to do.

It seems pretty hard to get into a major company though.

For example, I just googled "SDR jobs Vancouver" and here are some examples of companies that are currently hiring:

XenCall: an intelligent software that predicts which lead is most likely to close and which agent is most likely to close it.

PhotoSat: provides a highly accurate satellite surveying service catered towards engineers, geologists, and oil/gas companies.

Procurify: a software that allows companies to better track and manage their spending.

Quoter: allows your company to create professional-looking sales proposals quickly and efficiently.

I have lots of telemarketing and inside sales experience, so I could probably get hired at one of these companies if I tried, but I have many concerns, mainly:

1. I don't have any technical knowledge.

I've sold knives, anti-aging skin creams, got people to donate to charities, setup appointments for realtors, but my technical knowledge is close to zero. I majored in psychology, so you could say that I'm pretty "retarded" when it comes to technology.

2. I'm scared of failing and job hopping until I'm 30.

There's a reason most SDR jobs have a high turn-over rate: it's incredibly easy to burn out from the repetitive nature of the job and the constant rejection that it entails.

I'm turning 25 this year and quite frankly, I'm tired of hopping from job to job, making money, but not really progressing into any suitable career.

If I get a job as an SDR and I get fired for not setting up enough qualified appointments, then what am I to do? Keep trying to get another SDR job until I find one that I succeed at? What if I never succeed?

These are some of my biggest fears when it comes to pursuing a career in sales.

You live in Vancouver and have experience with appointment setting for Realtors.. Why not become a Realtor yourself? Sell one house a month in Vancouver and you'll make way more than any of these tech sales positions.
(This post was last modified: 05-14-2019 12:18 PM by captain_shane.)
05-14-2019 12:17 PM
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Post: #169
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
I should also mention a way to get directly to the field: payroll/HR software.

Companies like ADP, Paychex, Paycom, Trinet, etc offer field positions to people without much experience to sell primarily cloud payroll software but also some HR benefits type stuff.

You don't really do an inside sales stint and go directly to the field with small business accounts.

That being said, it's a real grind. Real door to door, heavy prospecting type stuff. Paycom/ADP pays pretty well but I've heard it's an absolute nightmare in terms of hours.

Exit options are there but questionable. I know that Medical Device recruits old ADP reps (and sometimes enterprise hardware companies) but I'm unsure about the rest. It's a good stamp on your resume that you're a hustler and hard worker as well as the fact that you're selling a cloud solution. However, the payroll industry has considerably less prestige than true enterprise tech so don't expect to get a great field job after a couple years there. There are a million shitty payroll reps looking to get out and often can't get what they want in terms of a field position. I knew a top payroll rep who couldn't get his foot in any big tech company and settled for some sort of professional services gig.

I almost considered ADP but glad I didn't as I know it would be a grind and questionable as a stepping stone to a top tech company.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
05-14-2019 06:20 PM
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Graft Offline
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Post: #170
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-14-2019 12:45 AM)Alpha_Ambitionz Wrote:  It seems pretty hard to get into a major company though.

For example, I just googled "SDR jobs Vancouver" and here are some examples of companies that are currently hiring:

XenCall: an intelligent software that predicts which lead is most likely to close and which agent is most likely to close it.

PhotoSat: provides a highly accurate satellite surveying service catered towards engineers, geologists, and oil/gas companies.

Procurify: a software that allows companies to better track and manage their spending.

Quoter: allows your company to create professional-looking sales proposals quickly and efficiently.

I have lots of telemarketing and inside sales experience, so I could probably get hired at one of these companies if I tried, but I have many concerns, mainly:

1. I don't have any technical knowledge.

I've sold knives, anti-aging skin creams, got people to donate to charities, setup appointments for realtors, but my technical knowledge is close to zero. I majored in psychology, so you could say that I'm pretty "retarded" when it comes to technology.

2. I'm scared of failing and job hopping until I'm 30.

There's a reason most SDR jobs have a high turn-over rate: it's incredibly easy to burn out from the repetitive nature of the job and the constant rejection that it entails.

I'm turning 25 this year and quite frankly, I'm tired of hopping from job to job, making money, but not really progressing into any suitable career.

If I get a job as an SDR and I get fired for not setting up enough qualified appointments, then what am I to do? Keep trying to get another SDR job until I find one that I succeed at? What if I never succeed?

These are some of my biggest fears when it comes to pursuing a career in sales.

This post resonates a lot with me because at around 25 I was feeling the same way and was tired of bouncing around and not progressing.

If I were to look at your resume and give you any sort of advice it's that you must drastically get better at job selection. Your jobs look like a combination of MLM/telemarketing and those skills are not transferrable in any legitimate sales job. You must get a B2B job with a high success rate ASAP or you won't make it.

I want to reiterate that this career is very risky when you are in that position. Bouncing around is not like bouncing around as a programmer in the Bay Area where you are pretty much guaranteed to make six figures and hone your skills along the way. It's very possible to bounce around and not improve at anything along the way except job selection. Failing until your 30's is very possible unless one of these jobs works out for you, that's why job selection is so key in this process.

I can't speak for jobs in Canada but I know that if you are in this guy's position, you have to be prepared to move. Most of the successful tech reps that I've seen have moved at least two times: once for their SDR/inside sales training, then the second time when a territory opens up for their field job. It's possible to move up the ranks in one city but sometimes you gotta pay the price and go where the opportunity is.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
05-14-2019 06:38 PM
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ChicagoFire Offline
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Post: #171
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-13-2019 09:29 PM)Graft Wrote:  Regarding faking your CV and college degree: it depends. All the advice on the internet says not to to it because you could lose your job if you're found out. This makes sense if you actually have a career to lose. I'm not willing to lie on my CV right now but when I was busting ass trying to get entry level gigs that I know I'd stay for 1-2 years then I was willing to do whatever it took to get in the door. Once in a while smaller companies won't actually check and if you gotta put food on the table then do what you have to do.

In one of my jobs I bumped into a loser who when I look back either lied or dealt drugs to land his way into a middle management position. We're talking a excon in his mid 30s making $14/hour telling college kids what to do. With people like this you hopefully have moved on to greener pastures in your life or you fucked up badly to have to work with them. If you were to go this route you better shoot for starting your own company because you can get found out for pulling wool over people's eyes. "Advice" on the internet is stupid and there are people who will do whatever they want.

@AA
Were you the poster that called thousands of times and couldn't sell? At that point I would go door to door and sell your own products. I know I posted weeks ago I was doing this but some things have gotten in the way. I'll have to see in a month or two if I follow through with what I preach. With door to door it's rejection but you collect all the profit. With my case I can make a couple hundred per day and tell my current employer to fuck off. God forbid I have to beg the food industry/old employers to hire me since I'm in the process of going back to school.

(09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
(This post was last modified: 05-15-2019 09:34 PM by ChicagoFire.)
05-15-2019 09:28 PM
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Zeroblack Offline
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Post: #172
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-13-2019 11:11 PM)Graft Wrote:  
(05-13-2019 10:22 PM)redbeard Wrote:  
(05-13-2019 09:29 PM)Graft Wrote:  This is why I'd rather be an SDR at a major co where I know I'll be in the field in 3 years rather than an inside rep at a no name with no field presence looking to grab a coveted field spot at any company.

Could you elaborate on this a bit more? i.e. what to look for in a company/position/territory.

As most of you know, I'm currently an SDR. I want to make sure that when I land AE, I'm not at a company that's going nowhere (whether that's my current company or not). That way I can build my rolodex and avoid jumping from job to job.

I think this thread has talked a lot about how to get the job, but not so much what makes a job.

I've talked a lot about this. I made a list of what I felt were first tier and second tier tech companies which are great to start a career.

When you start a job you're basically looking at Linkedin to see how long SDRs get promoted and what kind of turnover the past reps had.

You always want to think about exit options and what kind of companies will scoop you up once you leave. You can use Linkedin to find out where the reps went after that.

Say you work for a company called Kamatera, a small no name IaaS provider. You're able to get to a closing role and make a pretty good name for yourself, but the company probably doesn't have great future in itself. But you see that the main competitors in the space are Amazon Web, Microsoft, Google, and IBM. You could leverage your highly sought after domain experience from that and interview at one of the big boys.

This is different than working at a niche software company with a small market which won't give you any transferrable technology knowledge.

On the other side, if you get into a big company you learn a whole host of different technologies which can be transferred to so many smaller competitors trying to take market share. This valuable skill and brand experience gives you a lot of leverage and these companies should pay you a shit load to leave.
Thank god the previous BDR in my position left to salesforce after a year.
It sounds like breaking into this industry is getting harder with each year.
05-16-2019 05:05 PM
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Graft Offline
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Post: #173
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-16-2019 05:05 PM)Zeroblack Wrote:  Thank god the previous BDR in my position left to salesforce after a year.
It sounds like breaking into this industry is getting harder with each year.

For the most part, the industry is getting harder to get into but don't forget the effects of the economy. I spent a good five years in the Obama administration trying to break in, it was not fun at all. Companies are hiring people they would have never considered in the past which is a good sign.

I would say the industry has a medium barrier to entry as compared to finance or consulting which are much harder to get into. This is an industry where you can still fuck around in college, work a couple of pointless jobs, get lucky and make it.

I had mentioned in a previous thread that the industry will become much harder to get into as word gets out that young guys are making so much money.

The truth is that most non elite college graduate males end up in some type of sales, whether it's recruiting, dog shit like Yelp/life insurance, or smaller tech/consulting shops. Most college boys don't dream of a career in sales, but when they graduate and realize that their career as a sports broadcaster/marketing director/CEO doesn't work out, they come to a quick realization that all of the fun bullshit jobs go to women to fill EEO quotas and all of the sales jobs are open for men.

If you don't major in STEM, finance, law, or accounting (which sucks btw), there is very little demand for a male outside the sales profession. Plus you have to account for all the guys that either tried those jobs and hated it or couldn't break in the first place due to grades or lack of connections.

If I had to do my career all over again I would major in Comp Sci/MIS, (not giving a fuck about GPA), and take the sales engineering route. Sales engineers have a higher base but lower upside than a non technical rep, but it's very easy for a good SE to transfer to an AE role where technical expertise is important.

I built this empire and I did it by myself. Nobody did it for me. Not Ivana, not Marla. Nobody! ~Donald Trump
05-16-2019 11:40 PM
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ChicagoFire Offline
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Post: #174
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
(05-16-2019 11:40 PM)Graft Wrote:  For the most part, the industry is getting harder to get into but don't forget the effects of the economy. I spent a good five years in the Obama administration trying to break in, it was not fun at all. Companies are hiring people they would have never considered in the past which is a good sign.

I remembered about a month ago while I was dicking around at my job reaching out to 15 Salesforce Trailblazers admins and never heard back from any of them. All I wanted to do was volunteer, I never asked them for a job. Even just volunteering in general I get shut down, I have a particularly special case (no I'm not a juvy) as a teenager that I bring up but some people don't care that I want to be helpful. If I wanted to try to break into sales again I'd do it while on the company's dime. I can sympathize with the sales pros here.

/end rant
law of averages and being a hungry motherfucker win at the end of the day I guess.

Quote:If you don't major in STEM, finance, law, or accounting (which sucks btw), there is very little demand for a male outside the sales profession. Plus you have to account for all the guys that either tried those jobs and hated it or couldn't break in the first place due to grades or lack of connections.

Fucking a. Describes my career to a T. I'm glad this forum exists where we can talk about taboo topics that a normie would get his panties in a twist.

I graduated with a technical degree but due to not networking I couldn't get a job in my degree. LOL at anyone who says college is the only path to success.

(09-21-2018 09:31 AM)kosko Wrote:  For the folks who stay ignorant and hating and not improving their situation during these Trump years, it will be bleak and cold once the good times stop.
05-17-2019 06:23 AM
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Zeroblack
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Post: #175
RE: Inside/Outside Sales Datasheet
Hey Gents, need some advices.

I’ve been an SDR for 12 months now, my account executive doesn’t close any of the qualified leads. I’m really demotivated to keep trying since we’re not closing any deals.

It’s a new company, the product is O.K. (nothing ground breaking), I honestly don’t see much difference between us and competitors that already have a huge market share and I was one of the newest SDRs to join the startup.

Pros: Great culture, support and team.

What should I do? Leave and find another SDR role at a company with a better product and is growing fast?

Some might say I need to work harder, but I’m making so many calls and trying too many scripts and emails and nothing seems to work. My numbers are exactly the same as the other SDR! I’ve had 3 instances where the qualified lead after the demo with the AE would send me an email telling me that the AE didn’t send the pricing they requested. When I confronted him, he would say he forgot lol.. I don’t put much effort anymore, I’m slacking off hard.

I don’t think this startup will grow. That’s my honest opinion.
05-17-2019 09:33 AM
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