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Weightlifting books
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Long Haired Samson Offline
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Weightlifting books
So what weightlifting/bodybuilding books have you guys read over the years? I have these three books on my bookshelf. They offer different perspectives which I like.

The New Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding : The Bible of Bodybuilding, Fully Updated and Revised

Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd edition

Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength-2nd Edition
09-14-2017 09:53 PM
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Hannibal Offline
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RE: Weightlifting books
I've read a lot of weightlifting books over the years.

Issuance of Insanity I, II, and III by Jamie Lewis are all great books. They describe how to get huge and strong off a very deregulated routine where you go fucking hard all the time. The third one details his diet. If you want to get into powerlifting, his book Destroy the Opposition is also a fine read.

Building the Gymnastic Body by Coach Sommers is a good read for some ideas on gymnastic training. I don't recommend a gymnastic only approach, but integrating some of the movements into a routine (like the Lsit, the planche, the front lever and perhaps some upper body pressing and pulling) is never a bad idea. The Steady State Cycle is also a great idea for guys who just want to go to the gym, plug away at the same shit over and over and still get somewhere without thinking too hard.

Never Gymless by Ross Enamait is the end all, be all cohesive book on training at home. Ross incorporates all different forms of training, sandbags, odd object lifts, bodyweight exercise, massive amounts of condition and just regular ole weight training into his routine. He trains boxers, but the man himself is fucking jacked and well conditioned.

Base Building by Paul Carter is another fine book that teaches you how to design long cycle routines in order to peak for a powerlifting competition. His approach is far more structured and it's a good springboard for lifters who don't know what to do after Starting Strength and desire a more paint-by-numbers kind of lifting plan.

I've read most of the books on Dragon Door and I can say that they're mostly geared towards guys who want to buy into a "lifting culture" like kettlebells or bodyweight only or whatever the fuck and, although it's not bad, it has a tendency to create a shitty little community full of guys who say shit like "Well this routine isn't about making visible changes to your physique or getting a big bench, it's about functional strength and being able to run up stairs without ever running up stairs." They're the kind of guys who walk into a gym and see all these huge strong dudes and they're like "yeah well they might be able to bench big but I bet they can't do turkish getups with the two pood!".

Notable exceptions to this would be Convict Conditioning provided you understand full well that going much past 20 reps on any of the exercises is a waste of time and that some of the progressions (the squat series in particular with the basketball) are complete nonsense.

The other one would be Power to the People, a book that teaches you exactly how to train two or three movements with fine progression scheme to build massive levels of strength without ever breaking a sweat. It's basically the laziest way to get to a double bodyweight deadlift ever devised. I would consider it to be a peaking program, but there was a guy who basically just did Power to the People for three years straight and he achieved a 135 lb side press (again, weird lifts for weird people). The guy went on to do other goofy shit like one handed deadlifts with 500 lbs, so he's like Logan Christopher except actually strong.

“I have a very simple rule when it comes to management: hire the best people from your competitors, pay them more than they were earning, and give them bonuses and incentives based on their performance. That’s how you build a first-class operation.”
― Donald J. Trump

If you want some PDF's on bodyweight exercise with little to no equipment, send me a PM and I'll get back to you as soon as possible.
09-16-2017 02:34 AM
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RE: Weightlifting books
Cycles for pennies by DC.
09-16-2017 08:25 AM
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blck Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Weightlifting books
[Image: 3fd92d0476aada69bebfe0e89d3119621a343d8c...1e4e39.jpg]

Tell them too much, they wouldn't understand; tell them what they know, they would yawn.
They have to move up by responding to challenges, not too easy not too hard, until they paused at what they always think is the end of the road for all time instead of a momentary break in an endless upward spiral
09-16-2017 08:40 AM
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RE: Weightlifting books
"Roosh V Forum > Main > Lifestyle > Weightlifting & Fitness > Weightlifting books
"
How heavy are the books???
09-16-2017 09:14 AM
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Long Haired Samson Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Weightlifting books
(09-16-2017 02:34 AM)Hannibal Wrote:  I've read a lot of weightlifting books over the years.

Issuance of Insanity I, II, and III by Jamie Lewis are all great books. They describe how to get huge and strong off a very deregulated routine where you go fucking hard all the time. The third one details his diet. If you want to get into powerlifting, his book Destroy the Opposition is also a fine read.

Building the Gymnastic Body by Coach Sommers is a good read for some ideas on gymnastic training. I don't recommend a gymnastic only approach, but integrating some of the movements into a routine (like the Lsit, the planche, the front lever and perhaps some upper body pressing and pulling) is never a bad idea. The Steady State Cycle is also a great idea for guys who just want to go to the gym, plug away at the same shit over and over and still get somewhere without thinking too hard.

Never Gymless by Ross Enamait is the end all, be all cohesive book on training at home. Ross incorporates all different forms of training, sandbags, odd object lifts, bodyweight exercise, massive amounts of condition and just regular ole weight training into his routine. He trains boxers, but the man himself is fucking jacked and well conditioned.

Base Building by Paul Carter is another fine book that teaches you how to design long cycle routines in order to peak for a powerlifting competition. His approach is far more structured and it's a good springboard for lifters who don't know what to do after Starting Strength and desire a more paint-by-numbers kind of lifting plan.

I've read most of the books on Dragon Door and I can say that they're mostly geared towards guys who want to buy into a "lifting culture" like kettlebells or bodyweight only or whatever the fuck and, although it's not bad, it has a tendency to create a shitty little community full of guys who say shit like "Well this routine isn't about making visible changes to your physique or getting a big bench, it's about functional strength and being able to run up stairs without ever running up stairs." They're the kind of guys who walk into a gym and see all these huge strong dudes and they're like "yeah well they might be able to bench big but I bet they can't do turkish getups with the two pood!".

Notable exceptions to this would be Convict Conditioning provided you understand full well that going much past 20 reps on any of the exercises is a waste of time and that some of the progressions (the squat series in particular with the basketball) are complete nonsense.

The other one would be Power to the People, a book that teaches you exactly how to train two or three movements with fine progression scheme to build massive levels of strength without ever breaking a sweat. It's basically the laziest way to get to a double bodyweight deadlift ever devised. I would consider it to be a peaking program, but there was a guy who basically just did Power to the People for three years straight and he achieved a 135 lb side press (again, weird lifts for weird people). The guy went on to do other goofy shit like one handed deadlifts with 500 lbs, so he's like Logan Christopher except actually strong.

I'll have to check out these books for sure. I've heard of the Building the Gymnastic Body book before. I know gymnasts can get freakishly strong through gymnastics only training.
(This post was last modified: 09-18-2017 02:50 PM by Long Haired Samson.)
09-18-2017 02:50 PM
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