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Permanently living in a hotel.
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Blancpain Offline
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Permanently living in a hotel.
For the past 3-4 years I've travelled so much that I've become very used to staying in hotels. Now I'm trying to build a setup where I can permanently stay in a 4 star hotel.


I always like having people around me, whenever I'm alone I go to the lobby to chill, or to the hotels bar to have a few drinks.

But I have not stayed for more than 2 weeks straight at the same hotel, so I don't know what it feels like to permanently live there.
I'm an extremely messy person, everyone who has lived with me in the same place for more than 2 days can confirm, housekeeping is a huge lifesaver for me.

Has anyone here lived in a hotel for an extended period of time? I cant see myself living in a normal condo unless I get married.

Is it possible to negotiate an attractive rate with a decent hotel if you tell that that you're gonna stay at least 6 months?

Obviously I'm not talking about the west here, but developing countries like Thailand,Turkey where you can get a decent room without breaking the bank.

I've made a list of pros and cons.

Pros:
When something breaks (A/C,Plumbing), they'll get it fixed immediately or change your room.
Better security.
You can get the fuck out whenever you please
Dont have to deal with stuck up landlords

Cons:
If it has an open buffet you'll probably start memorizing the menu.
It is obviously pricier.
Harder to bring girls to your room (walk of shame)
Internet connection might be an issue if you need a very fast connection.
(This post was last modified: 01-31-2018 05:23 PM by Blancpain.)
01-31-2018 05:16 PM
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worldwidetraveler Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(01-31-2018 05:16 PM)Blancpain Wrote:  For the past 3-4 years I've travelled so much that I've become very used to staying in hotels. Now I'm trying to build a setup where I can permanently stay in a 4 star hotel.


I always like having people around me, whenever I'm alone I go to the lobby to chill, or to the hotels bar to have a few drinks.

But I have not stayed for more than 2 weeks straight at the same hotel, so I don't know what it feels like to permanently live there.
I'm an extremely messy person, everyone who has lived with me in the same place for more than 2 days can confirm, housekeeping is a huge lifesaver for me.

Has anyone here lived in a hotel for an extended period of time? I cant see myself living in a normal condo unless I get married.

Is it possible to negotiate an attractive rate with a decent hotel if you tell that that you're gonna stay at least 6 months?

Obviously I'm not talking about the west here, but developing countries like Thailand,Turkey where you can get a decent room without breaking the bank.

I've made a list of pros and cons.

Pros:
When something breaks (A/C,Plumbing), they'll get it fixed immediately or change your room.
Better security.
You can get the fuck out whenever you please
Dont have to deal with stuck up landlords

Cons:
If it has an open buffet you'll probably start memorizing the menu.
It is obviously pricier.
Harder to bring girls to your room (walk of shame)
Internet connection might be an issue if you need a very fast connection.

I spent years living out of hotels when I was contracting. I hated it to be honest.

I missed cooking the most.

Constantly running into a lot of people going in and out of the hotel. You have new people rolling in and out of the hotel constantly. Running up and down the halls, banging their luggage into doors and just acting like they are on vacation.

I always felt like it had very little privacy even compared to an apartment.

I would rather do a airbnb than a hotel. You have many of the pros and cut down on the cons of living in a hotel.
01-31-2018 05:45 PM
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Kona Online
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Post: #3
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
A few years ago I got some units in a condotel. This is where you buy the place then they put it in a hotel pool and you get a portion of the income.

One of the units is rented very damn night. Another one, which was a 1br and has a way better view was never rented. The income from the always rented one was enough to cover all the payments.

I said fuck it and took the unrented one out of the pool and just stay there whenever I want, or let people use it. I kept the amenities package which means I get two free parking, WiFi, and maid service daily. I bloody love it. I live in the country, and its in the city. I can go town and get shitfaced and stay there. I've stayed as long as a month before.

Look into the condotel option. Also I shall note,I got to learn what pied a terre is. I feel cool using the the French words.

Aloha!
01-31-2018 05:56 PM
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Windom Earle Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(01-31-2018 05:16 PM)Blancpain Wrote:  I'm an extremely messy person, everyone who has lived with me in the same place for more than 2 days can confirm, housekeeping is a huge lifesaver for me.

So get a housekeeper/tolerant girlfriend who likes to clean, or stop being messy.

(01-31-2018 05:16 PM)Blancpain Wrote:  Is it possible to negotiate an attractive rate with a decent hotel if you tell that that you're gonna stay at least 6 months?

Pros:
You can get the fuck out whenever you please

You want to negotiate a 6 month rate without any commitment? All the upside, but no downside.

How about you do some research and tell us how you went.
01-31-2018 06:03 PM
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Blancpain Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
^

I did research while I was in Bangkok, went to like 5-6 hotels. The rates they quoted me were not attractive at all, it was basically the same as the walk in rate * duration of my stay.

For example Holiday Inn Express Siam quoted me 2000$/ month while I was paying 70$/night there.

Maybe they didn't take me seriously I don't know.

However I got a great deal in a service apartment which had 2 * weekly housekeeping but it didnt quite give me the hotel experience.
01-31-2018 06:29 PM
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Blancpain Offline
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RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(01-31-2018 05:56 PM)Kona Wrote:  A few years ago I got some units in a condotel. This is where you buy the place then they put it in a hotel pool and you get a portion of the income.

One of the units is rented very damn night. Another one, which was a 1br and has a way better view was never rented. The income from the always rented one was enough to cover all the payments.

I said fuck it and took the unrented one out of the pool and just stay there whenever I want, or let people use it. I kept the amenities package which means I get two free parking, WiFi, and maid service daily. I bloody love it. I live in the country, and its in the city. I can go town and get shitfaced and stay there. I've stayed as long as a month before.

Look into the condotel option. Also I shall note,I got to learn what pied a terre is. I feel cool using the the French words.

Aloha!

Yeah condotels are a very good alternative in the developed world, but in the developing world they are a very new concept aimed to rip off the emerging middle class.

My family nearly bought a room in a condotel in 2013 located in Istanbul, we were about to pay 200k usd , now the same room is worth 100-110k usd at most and no one wants to buy it due to the very high monthly service fees.
(This post was last modified: 01-31-2018 06:34 PM by Blancpain.)
01-31-2018 06:33 PM
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debeguiled Offline
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RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(01-31-2018 05:56 PM)Kona Wrote:  A few years ago I got some units in a condotel. This is where you buy the place then they put it in a hotel pool and you get a portion of the income.

One of the units is rented very damn night. Another one, which was a 1br and has a way better view was never rented. The income from the always rented one was enough to cover all the payments.

I said fuck it and took the unrented one out of the pool and just stay there whenever I want, or let people use it. I kept the amenities package which means I get two free parking, WiFi, and maid service daily. I bloody love it. I live in the country, and its in the city. I can go town and get shitfaced and stay there. I've stayed as long as a month before.

Look into the condotel option. Also I shall note,I got to learn what pied a terre is. I feel cool using the the French words.

Aloha!

Thank god! I thought when I came to Oahu for Thanksgiving after spending the day being put to work on your lawn, and choking down the spit roasted pig with taro stuffing I was going to have to sleep on your couch. Glad to know I have a foot on the ground.

Hopefully not this kind.

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(This post was last modified: 01-31-2018 06:48 PM by debeguiled.)
01-31-2018 06:46 PM
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polar Offline
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RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Get a nice rental apartment. A corporate APARTMENT could solve all of your issues. Furnished, amenities of whatever building you're at, but they'll take care of your cleaning and plumbing issues. Food will be on you. Hotel food sucks more often than not anyway, certainly for what you'd get otherwise.

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01-31-2018 07:32 PM
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Suits Offline
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Post: #9
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Hotels have a business model that is generally incompatible with discounts. The model involves having a huge number of people on payroll and the number of people needed on the clock at any given time is positively correlated with the number of occupied rooms. If 20 rooms instead of 10 are generally occupied on any given day on average, there needs to be twice the number of clean staff hours, for example.

That's why a hotel charges 500% of what it would cost to live (per day) in an apartment twice the size. They aren't getting rich doing this (generally), they could be breaking even.

So they aren't likely to be interested in offering a significant discount for long term stay, as they might lose money on the deal, especially if they are typically booking out capacity each weekend.
01-31-2018 07:46 PM
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juicebox Offline
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Post: #10
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Aparthotel may be an option?
02-01-2018 08:40 AM
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Post: #11
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
It seems to me that most Airbnbs have the infrastructure in place and that you should have room to negotiate beyond the monthly discount if you ping the owner and ask for what you need. For six months, ask if they can refer you to a trustworthy cook/housekeeper for daily cleaning and errand-running (groceries, laundry, etc.) to pay separately and just have your own help on the payroll.

The "hotel experience" of sitting in the lobby and drinking at the hotel bar may not be there, but you can choose a neighborhood with an attractive strip to hang out on. I had an Airbnb on an alley in Paris, it was dead silent inside the building but you open the door and it's full of people on either corner. Your choice of quiet or busy places to hang out day and night. Every old city worth the time has some spots like this. Who wants to eat a hotel buffet breakfast? I have line-of-sight to two creperies.

If you're envisioning something more like Have Gun, Will Travel, where you have a full staff catering to your every need, you'll pay for it. If you're going to do this, you're offering to help them move 180 room-nights in twenty minutes. Don't talk to the front desk clerk, ask for a sales manager who can make decisions to come up from the office. Also, forget the Holiday Inn. Find the kind of place where the hotel is a family investment and the owner is around. I've gotten 15-20% off just for paying cash to local hotels in Greece, I'm sure you can do the same in Thailand and Turkey. Don't expect anything if you won't commit, though.

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(This post was last modified: 02-01-2018 11:25 AM by Jetset.)
02-01-2018 11:05 AM
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the-dream Offline
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Post: #12
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Never done it but in Manila there are a few attractive options that I thought would be nice and I'd consider if I had a bit more money, usually at 4* hotels or "serviced residences" that are designed for exactly what you are looking for. They double as hotels and you can rent nightly but they have a kitchenette. A couple of examples you can google would be "Makati Diamond Residences" and "Picasso Boutique Serviced Residences". They are of course more expensive than pretty much any apartment or condo in the area but I still think quite good value because you would be very hard pressed to find an apartment as luxurious and certainly not as convenient. They also seem to be a hotspot for high flying location independent people so would be a good spot to network.
02-01-2018 11:49 AM
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Post: #13
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Honestly, I would look into corporate housing with a maid service. All of the ones i've used are essentially 1 bed room apartments with everything you'll need (linens, towels, pots, pans, cooking essentials, etc).

Hotels aren't meant to be lived at long term. Not to mention, eating hotel food would be horrible on your health.

Shalom Alechem!
(This post was last modified: 02-01-2018 12:22 PM by The Beast1.)
02-01-2018 12:15 PM
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Beyond Borders Away
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RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
I've lived in hotels for years, often staying in the same one for many many months at a time. I used to do the apartment or condo thing, but it always turned into more of a mess than I wanted for one reason or another if I decided to leave town on a whim, and I always ended up spending time shopping for and buying a bunch of stuff I probably didn't need and then leaving it behind. Over the years, I've come to like the hotel option more and more as a long-term living solution.

I am a very spontaneous, free-wheeling type, and I love the fact that I can wake up one morning and decide I want to leave town for a couple weeks or completely relocate without wrapping up any loose ends. No matter what way you swing it, at least for me, a long-term living situation always brings in loose ends. I often do this - relocate on a moment's notice. I wake up, call downstairs to tell them I'm leaving, and I can pack my whole life up in a morning and be ready to check out and catch a cab to the airport.

It goes beyond convenience - it can actually be quite practical. This has come in handy in some oh-shit moments in my heavy drinking years. A couple times I had a reason to not want anyone to know where I was so I simply packed up and took off. It's also nice to be able to take off on a whim if someone you know runs into some trouble and you want to go lend a hand (sick family member, etc). Or if you just simply enjoy to stay mobile and avoid committing to recurring payments of any kind. The flexibility is just unparralleled and that fits my personality.

The maids come in just about every morning and clean up after me and stock me up with toiletries and water. As you mentioned, they fix any problems that need fixing - not only do they fix them, but in most cases you will not be cognizant they even exist. If need be, they will switch you over to another room so you're not inconvenienced. I can call downstairs and have a drink or a meal ordered or go lounge in the restaurant downstairs for a nice meal in a public setting without having to leave the building. Ineed, there are few things in life that I can think of that the hotel staff won't help you with or point you in the right direction if you ask - service is the whole reason the concierge is there, while an apartment staff is (usually) mainly there to manage the building.

My favorite hotel in Bangkok has and outdoor garden area where I can listen to music (sometimes mellow band) and smoke my pipe, a very nice and trendy restaurant serving Belgian ales, a huge pool and somewhat passable gym. They've also got guards at the gate and you can walk out and have them call you a quick taxi or a moto. Sounds like a small convenience, but I've never once had a driver who picked me up there try to scam me or even give me attitude, assumedly because the hotel creates a bit of accountability. These days I use uber a lot too though.

I pay about $33 a night for this place, and while it's certainly not 4-star, it's nice enough that local Thais get wedding pics done there all the time, and when I bring girls over they are instantly impressed walking into the lobby. It's just a very trendy place and a cool spot to spend your time. That's less than $1000 a month for the ultimate in flexibility and convenience - I say not too shabby. I've turned multiple friends on to the place and it's a cool enough building they splash it across their Instagram without fail.

As for the other guests, they don't really bother me and I never really notice them - they live in their reality and I live in mine. From time to time I'll strike up a conversation with one or check out some passing eye candy, but I really acknowledge them a lot less than you might think. It helps that most of the guests are Thai or from East Asia - if they were the calibre of Westerner that frequents some places in Thailand, not noticing them would be a much bigger challenge.

Condotels can be a good option. I'm staying at one in Chiang Mai at the moment, and there's a very nice pool here with pretty doable digs, even a small kitchen with a cooking surface (I love cooking but I've yet to use it, by the way, which commonly happens in Asia). I'm on a nightly rate right now, but they quoted me 8900 baht a month if I want to stay, which is a really big discount, and while I'm a bit outside the city, I can catch an Uber to downtown nimman area in about ten minutes.

I have gotten dicsounts in hotels before in Southeast Asia for monthly agreements, and the condotels are more common now, but a lot have also said no. But with prices out here, I really don't mind paying the daily rate if it means I can take off at a moment's notice, don't have to pay bills, and don't have to buy furniture.

The privacy regarding staff can be a bit of an issue. I tend to get very friendly with the people I see around me on a daily basis, constantly teasing them and playing around, so I inevitably develop over-familiar relationships with staff. This is cool because I'll show up after half a year away and everyone knows who I am and welcomes me with open arms. They do all kinds of favors for me and have even bought me gifts on holidays.

It gives you some of that social network you miss out on if you're living abroad and moving around a lot. They may even drag you to parties. But it can make it awkward when you're bringing multiple women home on a regular basis. Most staff members adapt to my habits and behave with candor even in times when I was partying my face off - but there have been comments and unmistakable expressions on the faces of others, sometimes even in ways that caused women to lose face (note: I've seen this in apartment buildings too when there was permanently staffed front desk setup).

I think the easiest way to keep the staff in line is to not get over-friendly with them, obviously. Keep your interactions with them short and just think of them as the help - not because you think you're better than them, necessarily, but just because practically it's in the better interest of your privacy. For someone with my personality, this is easier said than done, but it's definitely an approach I've considered.

Women also will prickle a bit more about coming to see you at a hotel. They get over it but it is in an issue, and they will be confused if you're telling them you live in town. On the other hand, I've lived with women in hotels too.

I have also thought about upgrading my life to the 4-star hotels. I've done this for shorter amounts of time and the added luxury (not to mention often a better gym with a steam room or sauna) really is nice. When you live in a hotel, a lot of what you're paying for is to have that entire staff at your beckoned call - you simply won't get that level of service in most apartment buildings. It can happen for the right price, but it's rare. So, by staying in a 4-star place, you are getting a much better staff working for you and an entire different level of service on top of the sheer comfort and luxury these places provide.

If you figure out a way to set this up at a steep discount, I'll definitely be tuning in to pay attention - I do have to say, though, that a 6-month commitment would probably take a lot of the appeal out of it for me. Might be worth it for the luxury in the right location and at a tempting price.

Another thing about 4-star hotels is I think that you get even more discretion with the more luxurious digs. They employ a more professional, higher caliber of help, and I've noticed the staff in such places can keep a straight face through almost anything and is generally well-trained to stay out of your business. Definitely a plus. So that might solve the privacy and candor issues already discusseed.

Hemingway lived in hotels for years at a time. I think there were some other famous male writers who were known for this. It makes sense when you consider the isolation and mental focus it takes to write a book - outsourcing so much of your life while going through it can be very valuable.

I wouldn't say it's for everyone, but I do think hotel living is underrated by a lot of single men with the means.

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(This post was last modified: 02-01-2018 12:30 PM by Beyond Borders.)
02-01-2018 12:20 PM
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Montrose Offline
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Post: #15
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
I lived 4 months in a hotel in NYC on company expense, and the rates were the same whether you spent 1 day or 4 months (but my company negotiated corporate rates at company level).

It was not a problem to get girls in, in fact it’s probably easier since they know it’s safe and they are curious about luxury place (but if they are looking for LTR they understand that you are here for short time). The problem was more avoiding my colleagues in the elevators when I was with a girl lol.

Overall it was a pleasant experience. The only thing is you cannot cook your food so you have to go out or order everytime, which depending on the neighborhood can be annoying. Also you have to leave your room for cleaning (you cannot and shouldnt be alone with the maid).
02-01-2018 12:30 PM
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RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(02-01-2018 12:20 PM)Beyond Borders Wrote:  I've lived in hotels for years, often staying in the same one for many many months at a time. I used to do the apartment or condo thing, but it always turned into more of a mess than I wanted for one reason or another if I decided to leave town on a whim, and I always ended up spending time shopping for and buying a bunch of stuff I probably didn't need and then leaving it behind. Over the years, I've come to like the hotel option more and more as a long-term living solution.

I am a very spontaneous, free-wheeling type, and I love the fact that I can wake up one morning and decide I want to leave town for a couple weeks or completely relocate without wrapping up any loose ends. No matter what way you swing it, at least for me, a long-term living situation always brings in loose ends. I often do this - relocate on a moment's notice. I wake up, call downstairs to tell them I'm leaving, and I can pack my whole life up in a morning and be ready to check out and catch a cab to the airport.

It goes beyond convenience - it can actually be quite practical. This has come in handy in some oh-shit moments in my heavy drinking years. A couple times I had a reason to not want anyone to know where I was so I simply packed up and took off. It's also nice to be able to take off on a whim if someone you know runs into some trouble and you want to go lend a hand (sick family member, etc). Or if you just simply enjoy to stay mobile and avoid committing to recurring payments of any kind. The flexibility is just unparralleled and that fits my personality.

The maids come in just about every morning and clean up after me and stock me up with toiletries and water. As you mentioned, they fix any problems that need fixing - not only do they fix them, but in most cases you will not be cognizant they even exist. If need be, they will switch you over to another room so you're not inconvenienced. I can call downstairs and have a drink or a meal ordered or go lounge in the restaurant downstairs for a nice meal in a public setting without having to leave the building. Ineed, there are few things in life that I can think of that the hotel staff won't help you with or point you in the right direction if you ask - service is the whole reason the concierge is there, while an apartment staff is (usually) mainly there to manage the building.

My favorite hotel in Bangkok has and outdoor garden area where I can listen to music (sometimes mellow band) and smoke my pipe, a very nice and trendy restaurant serving Belgian ales, a huge pool and somewhat passable gym. They've also got guards at the gate and you can walk out and have them call you a quick taxi or a moto. Sounds like a small convenience, but I've never once had a driver who picked me up there try to scam me or even give me attitude, assumedly because the hotel creates a bit of accountability. These days I use uber a lot too though.

I pay about $33 a night for this place, and while it's certainly not 4-star, it's nice enough that local Thais get wedding pics done there all the time, and when I bring girls over they are instantly impressed walking into the lobby. It's just a very trendy place and a cool spot to spend your time. That's less than $1000 a month for the ultimate in flexibility and convenience - I say not too shabby. I've turned multiple friends on to the place and it's a cool enough building they splash it across their Instagram without fail.

As for the other guests, they don't really bother me and I never really notice them - they live in their reality and I live in mine. From time to time I'll strike up a conversation with one or check out some passing eye candy, but I really acknowledge them a lot less than you might think. It helps that most of the guests are Thai or from East Asia - if they were the calibre of Westerner that frequents some places in Thailand, not noticing them would be a much bigger challenge.

Condotels can be a good option. I'm staying at one in Chiang Mai at the moment, and there's a very nice pool here with pretty doable digs, even a small kitchen with a cooking surface (I love cooking but I've yet to use it, by the way, which commonly happens in Asia). I'm on a nightly rate right now, but they quoted me 8900 baht a month if I want to stay, which is a really big discount, and while I'm a bit outside the city, I can catch an Uber to downtown nimman area in about ten minutes.

I have gotten dicsounts in hotels before in Southeast Asia for monthly agreements, and the condotels are more common now, but a lot have also said no. But with prices out here, I really don't mind paying the daily rate if it means I can take off at a moment's notice, don't have to pay bills, and don't have to buy furniture.

The privacy regarding staff can be a bit of an issue. I tend to get very friendly with the people I see around me on a daily basis, constantly teasing them and playing around, so I inevitably develop over-familiar relationships with staff. This is cool because I'll show up after half a year away and everyone knows who I am and welcomes me with open arms. They do all kinds of favors for me and have even bought me gifts on holidays.

It gives you some of that social network you miss out on if you're living abroad and moving around a lot. They may even drag you to parties. But it can make it awkward when you're bringing multiple women home on a regular basis. Most staff members adapt to my habits and behave with candor even in times when I was partying my face off - but there have been comments and unmistakable expressions on the faces of others, sometimes even in ways that caused women to lose face (note: I've seen this in apartment buildings too when there was permanently staffed front desk setup).

I think the easiest way to keep the staff in line is to not get over-friendly with them, obviously. Keep your interactions with them short and just think of them as the help - not because you think you're better than them, necessarily, but just because practically it's in the better interest of your privacy. For someone with my personality, this is easier said than done, but it's definitely an approach I've considered.

Women also will prickle a bit more about coming to see you at a hotel. They get over it but it is in an issue, and they will be confused if you're telling them you live in town. On the other hand, I've lived with women in hotels too.

I have also thought about upgrading my life to the 4-star hotels. I've done this for shorter amounts of time and the added luxury (not to mention often a better gym with a steam room or sauna) really is nice. When you live in a hotel, a lot of what you're paying for is to have that entire staff at your beckoned call - you simply won't get that level of service in most apartment buildings. It can happen for the right price, but it's rare. So, by staying in a 4-star place, you are getting a much better staff working for you and an entire different level of service on top of the sheer comfort and luxury these places provide.

If you figure out a way to set this up at a steep discount, I'll definitely be tuning in to pay attention - I do have to say, though, that a 6-month commitment would probably take a lot of the appeal out of it for me. Might be worth it for the luxury in the right location and at a tempting price.

Another thing about 4-star hotels is I think that you get even more discretion with the more luxurious digs. They employ a more professional, higher caliber of help, and I've noticed the staff in such places can keep a straight face through almost anything and is generally well-trained to stay out of your business. Definitely a plus. So that might solve the privacy and candor issues already discusseed.

Hemingway lived in hotels for years at a time. I think there were some other famous male writers who were known for this. It makes sense when you consider the isolation and mental focus it takes to write a book - outsourcing so much of your life while going through it can be very valuable.

I wouldn't say it's for everyone, but I do think hotel living is underrated by a lot of single men with the means.

Thank you so much for putting in the time to write this post, I think I found my long lost twin!

We have the exact same mentality!

4 years ago I woke up one day and decided to go Bangkok, purchased the ticket, time between making the decision and boarding the plane was less than 4 hours. From that day onward, I've been to Thailand 7 times. I've always purchased my ticket the same day I decided to go there

The thing I hate most is planning, I hate planning my trips in advance. The most fun I've had is when I decided to go somewhere spontaneously. It's way exciting that way.

I miss those days a lot, unfortunately I am not the same person as I've acquainted myself with some professional endeavours. I don't have that much free time anymore. If I had a decent passive income stream I'd go back to my old lifestyle in a heartbeat.

Why do I want 4 stars hotels? I'm not a person that seeks luxury, so 5 star would be too over the top, but 3 star on the other hand is too mediocre. I want decent room service and an attractive lobby Smile Usually the lobby atmosphere in 3 star hotels are too dull for my liking.

I don't care if the hotel doesn't have a swimming pool, or a spa for that matter.As long as there is a basic maintained gym and the build quality in the room is good then I'll be all set.
(This post was last modified: 02-01-2018 06:18 PM by Blancpain.)
02-01-2018 06:12 PM
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Simeon_Strangelight Offline
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Post: #17
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
I lived in the penthouse of a high-level 4-star hotel in Switzerland, but that was because I used the 5 mio. $ place of a buddy for an extended period. That was swell.

Also during my corporate gigs in Eastern Europe I stayed so often in 5-star hotels that I was practically living there. Actually I even considered staying permanently in hotels instead of the apartment I rented.

At this stage I would rather pick either 5-star or high-end 4-star hotels which are almost identical to low-end 5-stars - also the hotel should be big enough to give you some sort of anonymity - small hotels can get stale pretty fast even if they are nice boutique ones.

The thing essentially comes down to money and your individual choices.
02-02-2018 03:25 AM
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Blancpain Offline
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Post: #18
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(02-02-2018 03:25 AM)Zelcorpion Wrote:  I lived in the penthouse of a high-level 4-star hotel in Switzerland, but that was because I used the 5 mio. $ place of a buddy for an extended period. That was swell.

Also during my corporate gigs in Eastern Europe I stayed so often in 5-star hotels that I was practically living there. Actually I even considered staying permanently in hotels instead of the apartment I rented.

At this stage I would rather pick either 5-star or high-end 4-star hotels which are almost identical to low-end 5-stars - also the hotel should be big enough to give you some sort of anonymity - small hotels can get stale pretty fast even if they are nice boutique ones.

The thing essentially comes down to money and your individual choices.

Mandarin hotel(not the oriental) in bangkok fits your description perfectly it was a 4 star hotel big enough to give you anonymity and could easily pass off as a 5 star hotel. I stayed there last July paid 55 dollars a night, amazing deal. Just checked , same room costs 110$ now
(This post was last modified: 02-02-2018 07:54 AM by Blancpain.)
02-02-2018 07:48 AM
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Hypno Offline
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Post: #19
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Hotels will offer discounts for longer terms stays; they have less costs to acquire and service a guest. I would post on flyertalk.com and get recommendations from some of the frequent travlers there. Of course, that is a normie site, not red pill, but they are travel veterans.
02-02-2018 10:36 AM
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Akwesi Offline
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Post: #20
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
In my experience it is easier to get a deal for long-term stays if you are already staying at the hotel. Recently I was trying to get a one-month deal and called or e-mailed about a dozen hotels without getting anywhere. Then I brought it up at the hotel I was staying; the receptionist brought out the accountant from the back office and we negotiated a deal then and there that I was very pleased with.
02-02-2018 12:43 PM
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Blancpain Offline
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Post: #21
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(02-02-2018 12:43 PM)Akwesi Wrote:  In my experience it is easier to get a deal for long-term stays if you are already staying at the hotel. Recently I was trying to get a one-month deal and called or e-mailed about a dozen hotels without getting anywhere. Then I brought it up at the hotel I was staying; the receptionist brought out the accountant from the back office and we negotiated a deal then and there that I was very pleased with.


Elaborate please, how much percent was the monthly rate lower compared to your daily rate?
02-02-2018 12:49 PM
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Akwesi Offline
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RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(02-02-2018 12:49 PM)Blancpain Wrote:  
(02-02-2018 12:43 PM)Akwesi Wrote:  In my experience it is easier to get a deal for long-term stays if you are already staying at the hotel. Recently I was trying to get a one-month deal and called or e-mailed about a dozen hotels without getting anywhere. Then I brought it up at the hotel I was staying; the receptionist brought out the accountant from the back office and we negotiated a deal then and there that I was very pleased with.


Elaborate please, how much percent was the monthly rate lower compared to your daily rate?

They reduced the rate from 85 to 50 USD a day and upgraded me from a room to a suite. So about 40 percent plus the upgrade.
02-02-2018 04:11 PM
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kosko Offline
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Post: #23
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
Condo-hotels can be a risky investment as it is hard to make the numbers work for long-term ROI. The Internal Return Rates are wonky because you have rental unit's constantly shifting in and out of the income stream. Also, the suite style and suite mixes are weird because building a Condo versus building a hotel is not the same. Hotel units are constructed in a way to maximize the service of the units versus Condos which are designed to maximize the efficiency and space of the unit. Much larger or much smaller units can be the result depending on the building plans which can nuke resale values down the road.

The method of Condo-Hotel was a half-baked way to try and do flex living arrangements and mix in Time-share type set-ups before the age of Air-BnB.

For OP you are better off doing Air-Bnb and hiring a maid and cooking service. You can likely get all that for much more of a discount versus long-term hotel stays. If any do exist they are likely geared towards Expats who work for multi-nationals and they will jack up the price.
02-02-2018 05:09 PM
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puckerman Offline
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Post: #24
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
I lived in a hotel for nine weeks. It wasn't voluntary. My landlord sold my place, and it took that long to find something that was halfway decent. I stayed in Studio 6, which is an upgrade of Motel 6.

Maid service was certainly nice. I liked that basics like toilet paper and stuff were taken care of. It had a kitchen and a fridge. It was designed for long-term stays.

Biggest drawback was the lack of storage. I still had lots of stuff and had to put it in storage. If you have lots of stuff, it definitely won't be worth it.

Internet access was horrible. It was just plain slow most of the time. I complained about it--nothing came of that.

Regular hotels will give you a deal if you stay long-term. Some have weekly and even monthly rates.
02-03-2018 11:41 PM
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Suits Offline
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Post: #25
RE: Permanently living in a hotel.
(02-03-2018 11:41 PM)puckerman Wrote:  Maid service was certainly nice. I liked that basics like toilet paper and stuff were taken care of.

02-03-2018 11:47 PM
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