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Vaccine Datasheet
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Lampwick Offline
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Vaccine Datasheet
Overview

Many of us travel around the world, and can have higher exposure to various diseases. When I attempted to get a better handle on my vaccinations, I found it cumbersome to collect all relevant information in a concise form, so I created this datasheet.

This information generally applies to straight men who are in good health. Vaccines can take weeks to take effect, so plan on getting them well in advance of any trip. You can get usually get multiple vaccines at the same time. I have no medical background, so talk to a doctor for advice. Vaccine information changes regularly for a variety of reasons.

In the U.S., insurance companies may treat vaccines that are taken for routine preventative reasons differently than vaccines taken for travel purposes. For this reason, it may make financial sense to get vaccines in a hospital rather than a travel clinic, for example. My advice would be to call your insurance company to see which vaccines they will cover, and at which type of provider. For vaccines that they do not cover, shop around for the best cash price.

Keeping track of the vaccines you've taken can be challenging because medical records can sometimes be hard to locate or get copies of. You can keep track of your vaccines on your own using something like Evernote or Todoist.

When planning a trip somewhere, it's a good idea to check the CDC site for vaccine recommendations for that particular country:

CDC Destinations

Here is also an interesting site that talks about the types of vaccines:

Types of Vaccines

Routine Vaccinations

Chickenpox (Varicella)

Transmission: Person-to-person contact
Vaccine type: Live, attenuated
Administration: Two injections
Protection: Lifetime
CDC recommendation: The vaccine is recommended for everyone. If you have already received the vaccine, or have had Chickenpox in the past, then you no longer need it.

MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

Transmission: Person-to-person contact
Vaccine type: Live, attenuated
Administration: One injection
Protection: Usually lifetime
CDC recommendation: Adults who do not have "evidence of immunity" for measles should get the vaccine.
Notes: This one is kind of tricky. Almost everyone in the developed world receives this vaccine as a child, and that is usually enough. However, measles has been making a comeback recently. I talked to a doctor, and he estimated that about 10% of the adults that he's seen no longer have sufficient immunity from measles. But he said that insurance companies denied some claims when he ordered lab tests to confirm immunity. Instead the insurance companies wanted him to just order the vaccines because they're cheaper. So confirming you're immune may be more difficult than getting vaccinated again. This is not ideal, because you would be introducing a live virus into your body when it might not even be necessary.

TDAP (Tenatus (Lockjaw), Diptheria, and Pertussis (Whooping Cough))

Transmission: Tetanus enters the body through cuts, scratches, or wounds. Diptheria and pertussis are spread through person-to-person contact.
Vaccine type: T and D are Toxoid (inactivated toxin), P is Subunit/conjugate
Administration: One injection
Protection: Ten years
CDC recommendation: Everyone should get the TDAP vaccine once, usually as a child. After you've had the TDAP, then you need one TD booster every 10 years.

Hepatitus B

Transmission: Sex
Vaccine type: Subunit/conjugate
Administration: Two or three injections, starting and ending within a six month window
Protection: At least 20 years
CDC recommendation: If you have already received this vaccine, the CDC usually does not recommend a booster.

HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

Transmission: Sex
Vaccine type: Subunit/conjugate
Administration: Three injections, starting and ending within a six month window
Protection: Lifetime
CDC recommendation: The CDC only recommends that people get the vaccine if they are 26 or younger, preferably before they are sexually active.
Notes: A lot of cases of head and neck cancer have been popping up specifically for men in their 40s and 50s. The cancers are linked to HPV, but the exact method of contracting the virus that causes the cancer is still not conclusive. It's likely that performing oral sex on infected women is at least partly to blame. The vaccine was originally only recommended for people 26 and younger, but the FDA has recently approved it for people 27 to 45. Here is a thread on that topic:

HPV Vaccine Expanded for People Ages 27 to 45

Here is a thread by a member who got this form of cancer:

HPV-related Throat Cancer

Flu (Influenza)

Transmission: Person-to-person contact
Vaccine type: Subunit/conjugate (injection) or Live, attenuated (spray)
Administration: One injection or nasal spray
Protection: One year
CDC recommendation: Everyone should get the vaccine by the end of October every year, so that you're protected by the time flu season starts in the winter.

Vaccines for Travelers

Hepatitus A

High risk regions: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East
Transmission: Contaminated food or water
Vaccine type: Inactivated/Killed
Administration: Two injections, six months apart
Protection: At least ten years
CDC recommendation: Most travelers to high risk regions should get the vaccine.

Typhoid

High risk regions: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America. South and South East Asia have the highest risk.
Transmission: Contaminated food or water
Vaccine type: Live, attenuated (oral vaccine) or Inactivated/Killed (injection)
Administration: Four doses taken orally every other day, or one injection
Protection: Five years for the oral vaccine, two years for the injection
CDC recommendation: Most travelers to high risk regions should get the vaccine.
Notes: Some people have reported side effects with the oral vaccine. I personally didn't have any problems.

Malaria

High risk regions: Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East
Transmission: Mosquito bites
Vaccine type: N/A
Administration: Daily or weekly oral medications taken before, during, and after traveling
Protection: Effective while taking the medications
CDC recommendation: Some travelers to high risk regions, depending on travel plans, should take the medications
Notes: A vaccine for Malaria exists, but is not very effective. Medications are generally used instead. There are several species and stages of infection for Malaria, so there are a lot of drugs for the prevention and treatment of the disease. The most common seem to be Doxycycline, Atovaquone/Proguanil (brand name Malarone), and Mefloquine. Mefloquine in particular has reported mental side effects, so that should be noted. Other drugs are Chloroquine, Primaquine, and Tafenoquine (brand name Arakoda). The specific drugs you need depend on where you're traveling, and how long you're staying. Here is the CDC page with more specifics on these drugs:

Malaria Drugs

Yellow Fever

High risk regions: Tropical and subtropical areas of Africa and South America.
Transmission: Mosquito bites
Vaccine type: Live
Administration: One injection
Protection: Lifetime
CDC recommendation: All travelers to high risk regions should get the vaccine. Proof of vaccination is required for entry to some countries, especially if you're arriving from a high risk country.

Polio (Poliomyelitis)

High risk regions: Specific countries throughout Africa, Asia, and the Middle East
Transmission: Contaminated food or water, or person-to-person contact
Vaccine type: Inactivated (killed)
Administration: One injection
Protection: Lifetime
CDC recommendation: Most travelers to high risk regions should get the vaccine. Almost everyone in the developed world receives the polio vaccine as a child and therefore only needs a one-time booster injection as an adult. Adults that have never been vaccinated need three doses of the vaccine, starting and ending within a six to 12 month window.

Meningitis (Meningococcal Disease (serogroups A, C, W, and Y))

High risk regions: Central Africa
Transmission: Person-to-person contact
Vaccine type: Subunit/conjugate
Administration: One injection
Protection: Five years
CDC recommendation: Travelers should get a booster injection if they are visiting the high risk regions in Central Africa during the dry season (December - June).

Rabies

High risk regions: Africa and Asia, but found around the world
Transmission: Animal bites
Vaccine type: Inactivated/Killed
Administration: Three injections, starting and ending within a three to four week window
Protection: Six months to two years
CDC recommendation: Travelers who are more likely to come into contact with animals, especially dogs, should get the vaccine.

Cholera

High risk regions: Haiti and the Dominican Republic, specific countries in Africa and Asia
Transmission: Contaminated food or water
Vaccine type: Live, attenuated (Vaxchora oral vaccine) and Inactivated/Killed (Dukoral, ShanChol, and Euvichol oral vaccine)
Administration: Single oral dose (Vaxchora), two oral doses starting and ending within one to six weeks (Dukoral), two oral doses starting and ending within two weeks (ShanChol and Euvichol)
Protection: Three to six months (Vaxchora), two years (Dukoral), three years (ShanChol and Euvichol)
CDC recommendation: Travelers to very specific areas may consider getting the vaccine. Vaxchora is the only vaccine that is currently available in the U.S.

Japanese Encephalitis

High risk regions: Mainly rural areas of Asia
Transmission: Mosquito bites
Vaccine type: Inactivated/Killed (IXIARO) and Live, attenuated (Imojev)
Administration: Two injections starting and ending within one to four weeks
Protection: One year (IXIARO), five years (Imojev)
CDC recommendation: Travelers who are staying longer term, visiting during the transmission season, or spending extended time in rural areas are recommended to get the vaccine. IXIARO is not as effective as Imojev, but only the former is currently available in the U.S.
07-07-2019 02:31 AM
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RE: Vaccine Datasheet
Good thread. I just got vaccinated myself for a few things. After being in Morocco I realize people dont use gloves. You can go to a resturant such as mcdonalds. And you will see a guy sprinkling lettuce etc with no gloves... If he has hepatitis A and you are not protected, then its game over. Diseases can easily be spread. Its not like 1st world countries where people use gloves to handle food. It also makes it worse when these guys wipe their ass with their hands.. When i go get my haircut i smell shit from their fingers as they shave my beard. Same with woman in resturants when they come close to me i smell shit from their hands sometimes.

I dont remember having this problem in other 3rd world countries like thailand or colombia. But some countries they still dont use gloves to handle food even if you are eating in resturants you can still catch it in some of these 3rd world countries...



The only thing i am on the fence about is the maleria pills. From my research, locals and expats dont take them. They claim they have lots of side effects and are not even 100% effective. Maleria pills just seem to be pushed by 1st world doctors and other tourists... But locals and expats dont believe in them. I am not giving doctor advice to anyone but just food for thought... I will be traveling to ethopia for a month in november and i dont think I will take the maleria pills for a whole month.
(This post was last modified: 07-11-2019 08:04 AM by TravelingBodybuilder.)
07-11-2019 08:02 AM
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