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NoMoreTO Offline
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Farming Thread
We have lots of business threads but I was unable to find anything related to agriculture or farming. I am certain there are lots of members who are farmers, grew up on farms, work or worked in Agriculture & Livestock.

This thread is for sharing of information related to farming, crops, livestock, and farm lifestyle.

My experience is as follows:
- I was raised on a tobacco farm in Canada and worked on the farm from the age of 12 to 25. Changes in the industry related to the ontario flue cured tobaccos marketing board, political pressure, globalist economics, government regulation caused the end to the majority of tobacco farms in the area around 2007.
- My family also grew corn, soybeans, and winter wheat for cash crop
- Much of our family land has been rented to Chineese Ginseng Farmers, and more recently potatoes.

I am seriously considering returning to my hometown and going back to my roots. I have begun looking at the following crops, but am in early stages.
> Asparagus
> Watermelon
> Garlic
> Bison
> Hemp for CBD oil (Thanks Joe Rogan)

This thread is for all farmers, large and small, organic, hobby, urban farmers or whoever is interested in the topic.

It would be very interesting to know what crops people are working with, trends in crops and farming techniques, and of course farm lifestyle.

Bison capture my imagination, but it would be a learning curve. A possible growth niche market that fits consumer trends for organic, healthy meet.



“Where the danger is, so grows the saving element.” ~ German poet Hoelderlin
(This post was last modified: 07-26-2019 03:28 PM by NoMoreTO.)
07-26-2019 03:25 PM
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aeroektar Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
Good thread idea. Before I was old enough to get a real job, my mother would send me to work on her friends farm, I did everything from pick and package strawberries to slaughter hundreds of turkeys for thanksgiving. I went to tons of livestock shows and events all over New England, hanging out with other farm kids getting into trouble at County fairs, those are some of my fondest memories. I've lived most of my adult life as a degenerate city dweller, but ultimately I want to go back to that way of life and raise a family around it.
07-26-2019 03:55 PM
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-26-2019 03:25 PM)NoMoreTO Wrote:  We have lots of business threads but I was unable to find anything related to agriculture or farming. I am certain there are lots of members who are farmers, grew up on farms, work or worked in Agriculture & Livestock.

This thread is for sharing of information related to farming, crops, livestock, and farm lifestyle.

My experience is as follows:
- I was raised on a tobacco farm in Canada and worked on the farm from the age of 12 to 25. Changes in the industry related to the ontario flue cured tobaccos marketing board, political pressure, globalist economics, government regulation caused the end to the majority of tobacco farms in the area around 2007.
- My family also grew corn, soybeans, and winter wheat for cash crop
- Much of our family land has been rented to Chineese Ginseng Farmers, and more recently potatoes.

I am seriously considering returning to my hometown and going back to my roots. I have begun looking at the following crops, but am in early stages.
> Asparagus
> Watermelon
> Garlic
> Bison
> Hemp for CBD oil (Thanks Joe Rogan)

This thread is for all farmers, large and small, organic, hobby, urban farmers or whoever is interested in the topic.

It would be very interesting to know what crops people are working with, trends in crops and farming techniques, and of course farm lifestyle.

Bison capture my imagination, but it would be a learning curve. A possible growth niche market that fits consumer trends for organic, healthy meet.



I`d been thinking of starting a farming thread also. (Planned to call it farmer`s barn, hehe.) But it`s a great idea for a thread anyway. Since I`ve never farmed anything, I though it would be a bit presumptuous also. I`m personally a big fan of Allan Savory and farmers like Joel Salatin etc.

We will stomp to the top with the wind in our teeth.

George L. Mallory
07-26-2019 04:26 PM
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NoMoreTO Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-26-2019 03:55 PM)aeroektar Wrote:  Good thread idea. Before I was old enough to get a real job, my mother would send me to work on her friends farm, I did everything from pick and package strawberries to slaughter hundreds of turkeys for thanksgiving. I went to tons of livestock shows and events all over New England, hanging out with other farm kids getting into trouble at County fairs, those are some of my fondest memories. I've lived most of my adult life as a degenerate city dweller, but ultimately I want to go back to that way of life and raise a family around it.

Sounds pretty cool. It is a big leap to exit the city and go rural, there is a loss of conveniences but overall I think the family, friendship and community life is better out in farm country.

Its a unique experience working on a farm as a young guy, I had a great experience and was able to learn a whole host of skills much earlier than city guys. We learned to drive, operate farm equipment, and a whole host of other tasks that add up to an intangible skill set. There was also some pretty hard labour, but it is good for you. I think the pride that farmers feel at the end of a hard day is well justified. I work a corporate job now in an office, it has its' moments but its' just not the same.

“Where the danger is, so grows the saving element.” ~ German poet Hoelderlin
07-26-2019 04:33 PM
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Spectrumwalker Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
Hell yeah, great thread. I work on a big cattle ranch, but we do farming also putting up our own hay. We grow alfalfa and triticale. Good earning potential in bison. Never worked with them yet, but I do know you need some serious fences!

Dreams are like horses; they run wild on the earth. Catch one and ride it. Throw a leg over and ride it for all its worth.
Psalm 25:7
https://youtu.be/vHVoMCH10Wk
07-27-2019 12:41 AM
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Luther Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
Agriculture is the main industry where I grew up in Canada. By main I mean 90% of kids in my elementary school class were farm kids. I wasn't... my dad was a butcher. I know several guys who dabbled in bison. I didn't see any body making bank. It really is a niche. I think you're best bet would be shoot for the organic grass fed market, which is doable but not a cakewalk. The problem with meat is it needs to be butchered and more importantly inspected. Federal and provincially if you want to sell country wide. I dont know how many slaughter houses will kill and cut bison but it will be smaller ma and pop shops mainly. That restricts you.
My brother is working towards taking over a meat cutting business which processes everything from goats to bison from slaughter to a retail outlet. A very industrious man built that business up. The exception not the norm.
He's told some wild stories about killing bison. .30-30 To the head... their skulls so thick if he doesnt nail them straight on as they thrash sometimes the bullet rides up there skull and ricochets off... in a concrete room...
(This post was last modified: 07-27-2019 01:28 AM by Luther.)
07-27-2019 01:17 AM
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NoMoreTO Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-27-2019 12:41 AM)Spectrumwalker Wrote:  Hell yeah, great thread. I work on a big cattle ranch, but we do farming also putting up our own hay. We grow alfalfa and triticale. Good earning potential in bison. Never worked with them yet, but I do know you need some serious fences!

This is very interesting. I have never grown alfalfa but have heard that alfalfa is an ideal 'green manure' crop, or grazing crop, and essentially helps to bring back the land for legumes and other crops.

Triticale I have never really heard of, we have always grown rye and winter wheat, but according to Wikipedia it is a cross of the two:
Quote:Triticale (/trɪtɪˈkeɪliː/; × Triticosecale) is a hybrid of wheat (Triticum) and rye (Secale) first bred in laboratories during the late 19th century in Scotland and Germany.[1] Commercially available triticale is almost always a second-generation hybrid, i.e., a cross between two kinds of primary (first-cross) triticales. As a rule, triticale combines the yield potential and grain quality of wheat with the disease and environmental tolerance (including soil conditions) of rye. Only recently[when?] has it been developed into a commercially viable crop. Depending on the cultivar, triticale can more or less resemble either of its parents. It is grown mostly for forage or fodder, although some triticale-based foods can be purchased at health food stores and can be found in some breakfast cereals. When crossing wheat and rye, wheat is used as the female parent and rye as the male parent (pollen donor). The resulting hybrid is sterile and must be treated with colchicine to induce polyploidy and thus the ability to reproduce itself.


How many cattle are on the ranch? What is the acreage? Ranching seems like a beautiful lifestyle as there is just so much more land to enjoy and the cattle have freedom to roam which would be in my mind more natural state for the animal.

“Where the danger is, so grows the saving element.” ~ German poet Hoelderlin
(This post was last modified: 07-27-2019 03:33 PM by NoMoreTO.)
07-27-2019 03:32 PM
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NoMoreTO Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-27-2019 01:17 AM)Luther Wrote:  Agriculture is the main industry where I grew up in Canada. By main I mean 90% of kids in my elementary school class were farm kids. I wasn't... my dad was a butcher. I know several guys who dabbled in bison. I didn't see any body making bank. It really is a niche. I think you're best bet would be shoot for the organic grass fed market, which is doable but not a cakewalk. The problem with meat is it needs to be butchered and more importantly inspected. Federal and provincially if you want to sell country wide. I dont know how many slaughter houses will kill and cut bison but it will be smaller ma and pop shops mainly. That restricts you.
My brother is working towards taking over a meat cutting business which processes everything from goats to bison from slaughter to a retail outlet. A very industrious man built that business up. The exception not the norm.
He's told some wild stories about killing bison. .30-30 To the head... their skulls so thick if he doesnt nail them straight on as they thrash sometimes the bullet rides up there skull and ricochets off... in a concrete room...

Wow. That is great to hear your brother is continuing the family business. I believe butchers will come back into style as many people take more care in the food that they eat. I saw this in Toronto where many people began going to the butcher shop to have a more quality experience than the people behind the counter at your corporate grocery store.

With Bison (and all livestock), yes I have heard that the butchering must be done separately. To me this is a God send as I have no experience in this. Keeping the animals fed, happy, and fenced in would be a huge responsibility in and of itself.

My initial idea on sale would be to sell by the 1/4 bison locally. It is my understanding that if we were to sell by the 1/4 , then only a butcher would be needed, have you heard of this?

“Where the danger is, so grows the saving element.” ~ German poet Hoelderlin
(This post was last modified: 07-27-2019 03:44 PM by NoMoreTO.)
07-27-2019 03:43 PM
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-27-2019 03:32 PM)NoMoreTO Wrote:  How many cattle are on the ranch? What is the acreage? Ranching seems like a beautiful lifestyle as there is just so much more land to enjoy and the cattle have freedom to roam which would be in my mind more natural state for the animal.

We're on 8500 acres of natural grazing pasture and then there's the hay fields. We run about 250 cow/calf pairs and run yearlings til it's time to ship em to auction. And then not to mention the bulls. Ranching and farming is indeed the closest to natural life you can get in this modern world. Beautiful scenery that's for sure, but it comes with it's set of challenges and dangers. You're in close daily contact with the primitive realities of life, not to mention working with stock and ag machinery is a great way to end up hurt or dead. Myself been to the hospital twice in the last 3 years from angry cows. Actually one was a scared cow. But theres a hell of a difference between a scared cow and an angry cow.

But going back to alfalfa and the triti. Alfalfa can be used for grazing....if you're a masochist. Haha. I mean if that's what you gotta do, that's what you gotta do and I fault no man who tries to make it work. But If you're grazing cows on alfalfa you have to have a super meticulous grazing plan to make sure your cows don't die and have to watch them like a hawk. Alfalfa because of its makeup can cause one of the cows stomachs to bloat and crush their organs. If they do bloat you have a small time frame to phsyically make an incision in the stomach to release the gas for them, and then get ready to throw up everywhere. So yeah you can, but like I said you gotta be fine tuned. Like, it can't be early in the am when there's a dew on the field, make sure your cows eat something else before, yadda yadda. Stock husbandry is already challenging enough, intensive grazing is just to damn intensive. I don't like intensive grazing, where you have to micromanage cattle. I love calves and they always make me laugh looking at em, but they're stupid little shits. It's hard on the calves more than the mommas. By the time they get there bearings oriented, find where the water is it's already time to move them again and just stresses em out and they don't gain weight.

Like where I'm at the we grow alfalfa and the triti, cut and bale and save it for winter feed. By then the content of the alfalfa is fine to eat as is. But rest of the year they're just out doing there thing naturally like ya said.

Yeah triti ain't to common. But the cows fricken love it. Alfalfa is better to feed on real cold days because it gives them more energy to burn. But if we roll out two hay lines on an extra cold day, one of alfalfa and one of triti, the entire herd will be on the triti and not leave much to waste and save the alfalfa for last which is good for calves too because it gives them something to bed down in and stay warm. Even just going out there in the tractor with a bale the cows right away know which one you're bringing. If it's alflafa they'll just kind of casually stroll up taking there time. But if it's triti it's a damn mad rush to the chow line. They love the shit out of it.

Dreams are like horses; they run wild on the earth. Catch one and ride it. Throw a leg over and ride it for all its worth.
Psalm 25:7
https://youtu.be/vHVoMCH10Wk
(This post was last modified: 07-28-2019 06:57 PM by Spectrumwalker.)
07-28-2019 06:16 PM
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Brother Abdul Majeed Offline
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RE: Farming Thread
I have a very modest hobby farm, I'd hesitate to even call it a farm in light of the previous poster raising 250 head on 8500 acres.

It's about 4 acres cleared on an 8 acre parcel of land. Myself and my 2 man crew hacked most of it from the rainforest with nothing more than machetes. It was a lot of work, and the jungle just keeps creeping back in, so it's a constant battle. We also had to dig hundreds of metres of irrigation channels so that certain parts don't flood during the rainy season.

We grow 2 varieties of bananas, a lot of yuca, taro (that grows naturally without any help whatsoever), guan-do (a local bean variety, much in demand during certain festivities), a small amount of avocado and passionfruit, and a tiny amount of citrus fruits. It's a bit scattered, but other than the yuca and guan-do, everything was on there when I bought the land. The bananas were from an old plantation that had been swallowed up by the jungle years ago. We just had to hack them out and tame them.

There are also a good number of hardwood trees on the property, it rains a lot here, the sun shines a lot here, the conditions are perfect for them. They just grow.

I've had a few setbacks. Last year I brought in a new hybrid plantain plant from Honduras. I'm the first one in the area with them, and they grow more prolifically than the local varieties with bigger plantains and more plantains per bunch. They were growing very well, and after about 7 months we had a lot of plantains growing. I was very happy, and I looked forward to observing them grow every day. One morning I went to check on them and the damn capuchin monkeys had raided the plantains. Not only did they rip all the growing fruit, but they shredded the trees apart as well. The little bastards never touch any of the bananas that grow on the farm, but for some reason just loved those plantains.

As well as the capuchin monkeys, we.ve got howler monkeys, sloths, armadillos, caimans, boas, fer-de-lances, frogs, and lots of others. For the most part, the animals leave me alone and I leave them alone. I never cut down trees that sloths like to live in.

My house on the property is almost completed. It's completely off the grid, but I haven't sacrificed too much in the way of comforts. I'll move in before the end of this year and then I can really get started with my plans for the place. I wouldn't mind growing popular cash crops that gringos like to buy, as well as maintaining the local crops. It's a bonus for my workers to be able to take healthy food home every day. If someone has a presence on the property, the animals are less likely to hang around very closely.
07-28-2019 09:13 PM
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-28-2019 09:13 PM)Brother Abdul Majeed Wrote:  My house on the property is almost completed. It's completely off the grid, but I haven't sacrificed too much in the way of comforts. I'll move in before the end of this year and then I can really get started with my plans for the place. I wouldn't mind growing popular cash crops that gringos like to buy, as well as maintaining the local crops. It's a bonus for my workers to be able to take healthy food home every day. If someone has a presence on the property, the animals are less likely to hang around very closely.

That's awesome you're moving forward with your plans. Best of luck, thanks for the share. I see your flag is Panamanian. Very interesting to hear about the wildlife you have there and the unique challenges you face. Keep us posted!


[email protected], found this tonight snooping around YouTube. Kinda skipped through it so far, but looks interesting.


Dreams are like horses; they run wild on the earth. Catch one and ride it. Throw a leg over and ride it for all its worth.
Psalm 25:7
https://youtu.be/vHVoMCH10Wk
(This post was last modified: 07-28-2019 10:12 PM by Spectrumwalker.)
07-28-2019 09:36 PM
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RE: Farming Thread
^^^ I have seen that one. The story of these animals is pretty amazing, and how they are natural to the North American Continent. The people being interviewed just love these animals.

https://www.canadianbison.ca/producers/a...ing-trends
Cost of Calf 2400
Time to Mate 3 years
Cost to feed $800/yr
Calving Rate 1/yr/fem

https://www.farmanddairy.com/news/pastur.../27731.htm
Divided Paddock Management System
Underground Water System from Spring
Feed Warm Season Grasses

“Where the danger is, so grows the saving element.” ~ German poet Hoelderlin
07-31-2019 11:09 PM
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RE: Farming Thread
Quote:I've had a few setbacks. Last year I brought in a new hybrid plantain plant from Honduras. I'm the first one in the area with them, and they grow more prolifically than the local varieties with bigger plantains and more plantains per bunch. They were growing very well, and after about 7 months we had a lot of plantains growing. I was very happy, and I looked forward to observing them grow every day. One morning I went to check on them and the damn capuchin monkeys had raided the plantains. Not only did they rip all the growing fruit, but they shredded the trees apart as well. The little bastards never touch any of the bananas that grow on the farm, but for some reason just loved those plantains.

As well as the capuchin monkeys, we.ve got howler monkeys, sloths, armadillos, caimans, boas, fer-de-lances, frogs, and lots of others. For the most part, the animals leave me alone and I leave them alone. I never cut down trees that sloths like to live in.

There is a ton going on on your farm for sure. I think I would be walking around with a shotgun all Red Neck style with all these characters.

I like the sloths kicking around, they seem like easy going characters.

So is there any way to keep the Monkeys away? I suppose having a presence there when the house is built might help, would you go out there and scare em off or do they get wiley?

How are the plantain trees doing ? Are they bouncing back?

“Where the danger is, so grows the saving element.” ~ German poet Hoelderlin
(This post was last modified: 07-31-2019 11:24 PM by NoMoreTO.)
07-31-2019 11:20 PM
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RE: Farming Thread
(07-31-2019 11:20 PM)NoMoreTO Wrote:  
Quote:I've had a few setbacks. Last year I brought in a new hybrid plantain plant from Honduras. I'm the first one in the area with them, and they grow more prolifically than the local varieties with bigger plantains and more plantains per bunch. They were growing very well, and after about 7 months we had a lot of plantains growing. I was very happy, and I looked forward to observing them grow every day. One morning I went to check on them and the damn capuchin monkeys had raided the plantains. Not only did they rip all the growing fruit, but they shredded the trees apart as well. The little bastards never touch any of the bananas that grow on the farm, but for some reason just loved those plantains.

As well as the capuchin monkeys, we.ve got howler monkeys, sloths, armadillos, caimans, boas, fer-de-lances, frogs, and lots of others. For the most part, the animals leave me alone and I leave them alone. I never cut down trees that sloths like to live in.

There is a ton going on on your farm for sure. I think I would be walking around with a shotgun all Red Neck style with all these characters.

I like the sloths kicking around, they seem like easy going characters.

So is there any way to keep the Monkeys away? I suppose having a presence there when the house is built might help, would you go out there and scare em off or do they get wiley?

How are the plantain trees doing ? Are they bouncing back?

I did manage to rescue some of the plantains. They are a very hardy species. Most banana and plantain strains are very easy. When you get your crop, you cut the tree down and a new one will grow in it's place. The amount of water we get here is phenomenal. I suppose it's why those type of crops grow here in the first place. Hopefully I get some next year.

The capuchin monkeys are nothing to be afraid of, you can walk out there and they will scatter, but I also have howler monkeys on the property. They are like little baboons, very muscular and aggressive. You don't want to mess with them, they are unpredictable and capable of ripping your face off. They only go after my avocados, they don't care for much else. I let them.

No, I don't need a shotgun on the farm for animals, a machete can handle the animals. I do have an appointment in September so that I can qualify to carry a handgun. That will be more for handling humans than animals though. I'll keep it in my desk drawer if I qualify to get one (my Spanish has to be up to snuff and I have to convince them that I am sane). Every once in a while there's a break-in at someone's place where they tie the person up and rob them. It won't happen to me with a handgun.

Sloths are great. You wouldn't believe the number of tourists that come here with the express intention of just seeing sloths. After about 30 seconds, the thrill wears off though. They don't do much. We have even got a variety of dwarf sloths that can't be seen anywhere else on the planet. That's pretty cool. Very cute though.

Next time you're down south, stop by Bocas and I'll show you around.
08-07-2019 11:18 PM
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