I'm Touring The United States! Starting in June, I'm conducting private events in 23 American cities. Click here for full details.

Post Reply 
10 reasons you should never get a job
Author Message
newlife Offline
Banned

Posts: 80
Joined: Jul 2019
Post: #26
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-30-2019 02:43 PM)Vladimir Poontang Wrote:  Newlife, yes I agree. By the way I noticed some time ago someone told you to lay off making so many threads, either that or they said something about the types of threads you started. I can't remember exactly. I think you've got your head screwed on and I wouldn't want to see you get banned, so just be a bit careful. I myself had a shaky start here but somehow I managed to get past it. Maybe my username is just so amazing that it would break a moderator's heart to get rid of me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Jv_XR6RMAI

Thanks Vlad,

It is totally ok if I get banned. I will be leaving soon of my own accord. I found this place through different reason than most people here and it has turned out to be almost the complete opposite of what I was expecting.
(This post was last modified: 08-30-2019 06:09 PM by newlife.)
08-30-2019 06:03 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
newlife Offline
Banned

Posts: 80
Joined: Jul 2019
Post: #27
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-30-2019 04:57 PM)Cobra Wrote:  Probably one of the stupidest articles out there. It's marketing, short and simple, to make more naive people believe they can stop working.

Truth is that you can gain valuable experience from working. The more people you work with the more the value. The more professional the environment the more the value. The more skilled people you're around the more the value. These are sometimes the same individuals that will open their own shop or own and/or manage another company. Good people to know.

Over many years of work experience, you can deduce cold hard facts about work environments and treating employees that you will otherwise screw up if you leave and start your own gig.

That being said if you're passionate about an idea or concept, go for it if you have the balls but don't expect some theories from this article to guide you. You will need to figure shit out on your own, piss people off in the process and learn the hard way. That's okay but most people are not cut out for it.

On the surface these threads can seem useful but it's just laziness disguised into a package of bullshit.

There are too many skilled professions you absolutely will gain nothing but valuable experience from. Don't be a pussy.

Do you think naive people will quit their jobs because of a motivational article? Do you not desire to see and live the total truth of what is here? To dare for what is possible instead of the easy and customary?

The defenders of toil and suffering have always baffled me! Like drowning men who desperately cling on to others who can still swim on further.

So you prefer to cap your learning to a few hours a day at a single place and from a small number of coworkers who after a decade or two might decide to go on to work for another place? LOL! Ok man. Just be careful because a regular job provides some built-in socialization, but if you think about it, you’ll see that it’s very limited. An employee can be fired for excessive socializing on the job. But a guy who is his own boss can socialize freely at any time of day.

So you think it is pussy to go off on your own and be independent huh? Out of curiosity to your reaction I just found another article by the same author which is both witty and thoughtful and reminds me of you:

"Many people have the limiting belief that passive income is weird, unusual, complicated, or confusing. As I’ve mentioned previously, passive income isn’t particularly difficult in practice. In many ways, earning a living through streams of passive income is easier than earning a living through a job or as an independent contractor, especially in the long run.

The difficult part has to do with getting comfortable with a passive income mindset.

To tackle this mindset issue, let’s turn this around and look at it from the other side.

Suppose you were already very comfortable with passive income, just like I am. Imagine that you had many thousands of dollars coming in every month, more than enough to cover all your expenses. Whether you work or not, fresh income keeps flowing to you month after month and year after year, based on streams you set up years ago.

Imagine that this is your normal everyday reality. You’ve already been living like this for more than a decade.

Now imagine that a friend with a regular job tries to convince you that what you’re doing is weird or unusual and that you should adopt his mindset, give up your passive income lifestyle, and get a regular job instead.

If a job-loving friend did this with me, here’s what such a conversation might look like…

Friend: You know… you should join the world of real people and get a regular job. This passive income stuff you’re doing is just too strange.

Me: It seems to work well enough. What’s wrong with it?

Friend: Well… it’s not what most people do. Most people get jobs.

Me: How does that work?

Friend: Basically you go to work for some other company, usually a corporation. You do the work, and they give you a paycheck.

Me: Ok. Is my paycheck somehow based on the value I contribute?

Friend: More or less.

Me: So will I receive a fair amount relative to my contribution?

Friend: Depends on what you mean by fair. Obviously they’re not going to pay you 100% of what they think you’re contributing. They have to make a profit as well.

Me: Well do I get 80% of it or something like that?

Friend: Realistically it’s probably closer to 30%, but it’s not tracked that precisely. They don’t really know how much value you’re contributing relative to everyone else. On larger teams it’s especially difficult to know how much value any individual is contributing. So salaries invariably involve a lot of guesswork.

Me: Where does the rest of the value I create go?

Friend: It gets distributed in many different ways — as income to investors and stockholders, to company profits, to corporate taxes, to higher pay for officers, to various perks like company picnics, and so on. That’s for the higher-ups to decide, so it isn’t really up to you.

Me: Do I at least get a share of those company profits?

Friend: Not usually, although some companies do have a profit sharing plan, but even then they won’t share all the profits… usually less than half. Sometimes you’ll indirectly get a small cut, like in the form of a bonus.

Me: Hmmm… Do I have to work every day?

Friend: Usually just weekdays, but it depends on the job. You may also get a few weeks per year for vacation time.

Me: Only a few weeks? What if I want to travel for a month or two?

Friend: Well, you usually can’t. Maybe if you save up vacation time for a few years, then they would let you, but it’s not good to be gone so long at a stretch.

Me: Why does vacation time need to be saved up? Time passes on its own. If I can afford to go on vacation, why can’t I just go?

Friend: Because they need you to work.

Me: What if I’m burned out and don’t feel like working?

Friend: There’s free coffee.

Me: Good coffee or bad coffee?

Friend: Depends on the job, but there’s always a Starbucks nearby if they only serve Folgers in the office.

Me: Can I take my laptop to the Starbucks and work there?

Friend: Depends on the job, but usually not.

Me: Can I go on more vacations if I work from the road on my laptop now and then?

Friend: Not usually.

Me: Why not?

Friend: Well, they probably wouldn’t trust you to work if you’re out of the office too much.

Me: So they have to watch me work?

Friend: Basically yes. But also some jobs are collaborative, so they want everyone together in the same place.

Me: I often do work now that’s collaborative. We collaborate over the Internet or by phone.

Friend: Yup, some jobs are moving in that direction, but most employers still want you to show up each day.

Me: Where do I get to work?

Friend: That depends heavily on the type of job. For many office jobs, you’ll work in a cubicle.

Me: What’s a cubicle?

Friend: It’s a subdivision in a larger room, delineated by short fuzzy walls. You should have enough room for a desk and a chair. Typically you’ll have 50-80 square feet of space for yourself.

Me: So it’s like the Shire?

Friend: Pretty much, but usually not as green.

Me: My home office is about 200 square feet, and it has its own bathroom and shower. But I can work wherever I want, so I’m not confined to that space.

Friend: Yeah, you won’t get a space that size as a regular employee most likely, unless you work in management or some other high value job that warrants its own office. That isn’t what most employees get, but it isn’t out of the question. It just depends on the job.

Me: Do I get to pick my own job title?

Friend: Usually it’s assigned, but sometimes you can. It depends on the company.

Me: Can I pick Master?

Friend: Mmmm… probably not.

Me: What about the pay?

Friend: Well, you’d probably earn a lot less than you do now for doing the same kind of work. Just to give you an idea, the average salary for a blogger is about $17-38K per year (source).

Me: Wow… that’s a lot less than I earn now passively, even when I’m on vacation. How would I even live on that?

Friend: Other people get by on that much. You’d have to cut back quite a bit, especially since you’ll need more money for commuting (gas, car maintenance), professional work clothes if required, and various other expenses incurred by employees. But you might get a free company t-shirt and coffee mug and maybe a mouse pad if you’re lucky, so it sort of balances out.

Me: Ouch. But what if I could somehow earn the same amount I do now, but from a job instead of from passive income?

Friend: That would be very unlikely, but if you did manage that, you’d pay a lot more in taxes since this would all be W2 employee income. You can’t use your business like you do now to lower your taxes.

Me: How much more in taxes are we talking?

Friend: The extra taxes you’d pay would be enough to buy a new car every year.

Me: That doesn’t sound too appealing. Seems like it would be harder to get ahead if so much of each paycheck goes to taxes.

Friend: Yes, but the government understands this, so they make it look less painful by hiding a portion of those taxes, so it doesn’t seem like your income is being taxed as heavily. You never receive that part of your salary in the first place. Some of your taxes are disguised in the form of taxes paid by your employer, like the employer’s contribution to Social Security and Medicare for having you on the payroll. So even though your paycheck stub will report a certain base pay, your actual base pay (from your employer’s and the government’s perspective) is higher. You can bet that your employer is wanting to recoup those extra taxes from you in extra value you must contribute.

Me: I’m aware of this. U.S. tax laws are clearly hardest on regular W2 employees, who pay the highest taxes of anyone relative to their income. So why would people want to have their income allocated as W2?

Friend: Most people don’t know any better. Besides, they wouldn’t know what to do with all that extra money anyway. Lower pay keeps them out of trouble, and it ensures that they keep showing up for work. Gotta keep the economy going.

Me: Alright.

Friend: There are some job perks too.

Me: Like what?

Friend: You get health insurance.

Me: I have that now, but I hardly ever use it since I prefer to just stay healthy.

Friend: Well, you could afford to be less healthy if you had a job, and you wouldn’t have to pay for it.

Me: Hmmmm…

Friend: Free coffee too.

Me: You said that already.

Friend: Did I mention that you can have as much as you want?

Me: Ok. So what kind of work would I do at a regular job?

Friend: That depends on the job, but big picture… it’s usually something that supports the company’s goals.

Me: Who sets these goals?

Friend: At a well run company, the officers figure them out, with input from board members, key investors, and sometimes from employees too.

Me: Where can I see those goals?

Friend: Usually you don’t get to, but sometimes they’ll share snippets in the form of a company mission statement, a list of objectives, or perhaps a memo. But you’re not really going to know what the company’s true goals are. That’s normally shared on a need-to-know basis only, and most employees don’t need to know.

Me: Ok. So how do I know which goals to work on?

Friend: Usually your boss determines that, so you just do whatever your boss tells you.

Me: I have to have a boss?

Friend: Yup, everyone does. Even the CEO is accountable to the board and the shareholders.

Me: Ok, so what if my boss doesn’t do a very good job of telling me what to do?

Friend: That often happens. You muddle through. Just make sure you look busy when you’re being watched, and you should be ok. Personal accountability tends to be pretty low, so as long as you don’t stand out as being obviously idle, you’re probably safe.

Me: What if the boss and I disagree on how to achieve the company’s goals?

Friend: That’s where you start getting into company politics, which can be messy. Some people do what the boss says anyway, even when they know it won’t work. Other people try to push back or negotiate. Sometimes that works, but sometimes they get marginalized or even let go if the boss doesn’t like it. Usually people compromise somewhere in the middle.

Me: Are these compromises normally intelligent?

Friend: Not usually.

Me: If I do a good job of helping the company achieve its goals, do I get extra rewards for that?

Friend: Yes, sometimes. You might get a raise, a bonus, or a promotion. Or you might get intangible rewards like praise, appreciation, and recognition. Sometimes, however, you don’t get anything more than your base pay.

Me: How do promotions work?

Friend: You get a new job title and have more responsibility, which usually comes with higher pay. Sometimes it means longer hours too.

Me: What if I come up with a really great idea, but it’s not part of my assigned duties?

Friend: Umm… yeah… don’t do that.

Me: Why not?

Friend: You’ll just be a rabble rouser. The other employees won’t like it if you try to upstage them, and they’ll make your social life at work unpleasant till you back down.

Me: So if I try to work harder or smarter and get promoted faster, the other employees may try to hold me back?

Friend: Probably. Your boss may not like it very much either.

Me: My boss wouldn’t like it? Why not? Isn’t it part of his job to cultivate good talent?

Friend: Perhaps, but he wants to look good too. It’s not good for him if one of his underlings is outshining him.

Me: That doesn’t sound like an environment where I can really do my best work.

Friend: Yeah, but it’s all good. Fortunately your best isn’t required. You just need to get by. It’s actually easier this way.

Me: But if I know I’m not doing my best, then won’t I feel worse about myself? Won’t that lower my self-esteem?

Friend: Sure, but you get used to it. Everyone adapts.

Me: So what is it like to work with a group where no one is doing their best, and everyone thinks less of themselves and their coworkers because of it?

Friend: Pretty boring actually. But again, you get used to it. The free coffee helps it go down easier.

Me: Ok. So what about the sex?

Friend: What are you talking about?

Me: Well, if I’m with a female coworker, and we both get horny, then where do we go to take a shag break? Are there special rooms for that?

Friend: Oh no no no. That would be very much frowned upon. You could both get fired for that sort of thing.

Me: Fired? Why? What if it’s just a quickie and we still get all our work done?

Friend: Yeah, don’t do that. The company could get sued.

Me: Sued by whom?

Friend: Probably by the woman you had sex with.

Me: So if we have consensual sex, she would sue the company? For what?

Friend: Sexual harassment I guess. People have won millions of dollars doing that sort of thing.

Me: Ok, so I have to settle for blowjobs only then?

Friend: Goodness no. That’s just as bad.

Me: So what do people do if they get horny at work? People still get horny at their jobs, don’t they?

Friend: Sure… they get horny all the time. But they suppress it and pretend they’re not. Then they take care of themselves later, usually with Internet porn.

Me: People look at porn at their jobs?

Friend: Oh no. That’s frowned upon too. People could get fired for that as well.

Me: So basically while they’re at work, people still get horny, but they pretend to be asexual till they can take care of themselves later… like at home.

Friend: Yup, that’s pretty much it.

Me: Seems easier just to have a quickie, maybe take a short cuddle nap, and then go back to work refreshed and happy.

Friend: I’m pretty sure that’s illegal in a corporate setting.

Me: Ok, but those positive after-sex feelings make collaboration easier. Trying to suppress one’s sexual desires every day seems like it would be very distracting.

Friend: It is distracting of course, but remember that you aren’t expected to be too productive anyway, so it works out okay. And again, the free coffee helps with this as well.

Me: Ok, so let me get this straight. You’re suggesting that I shut down all my passive income streams, go to work for someone else, get a boss and do what he says even if his decisions are unintelligent, do mediocre work instead of my best, socialize with people who also do mediocre work, work longer hours for less pay, take fewer and shorter vacations and ask permission to take them, pay a great deal more in taxes, and on top of all of that… no sex?

Friend: Pretty much, yes. But you’re overlooking the security aspect.

Me: What’s secure about it?

Friend: Well, you’ll get a steady paycheck.

Me: How steady? Does it ever end?

Friend: Well sure it can end. You could get fired or laid off.

Me: Can I prevent myself from getting fired or laid off?

Friend: Not necessarily. It could happen due to circumstances beyond your control. Or you might just make a mistake. Or someone higher up may not like you.

Me: So how is that secure?

Friend: Well, it’s mostly secure.

Me: So if I get fired or laid off, how much residual income will I continue to get?

Friend: Usually none. You might get a severance package for certain jobs, but that’s only short-term for transitioning. For the most part, once your job ends, you stop getting paid.

Me: But currently I get paid whether I’m working or not. And I can’t be fired or laid off.

Friend: Yeah, that’s weird.

Me: Just feels normal to me.

Friend: Well, I know you’re kind of set in your ways, but jobs are very popular. They obviously work for lots of people.

Me: What about finding a job? Does everyone get one automatically?

Friend: Oh no. People have to seek them out and apply for them.

Me: How do they find jobs? Do they decide what they like doing and then find a job that lets them do it?

Friend: Usually it’s not that simple. Most of the time they have to see what’s available, and it probably won’t match perfectly with what they really like.

Me: And once they find a job and select it, then they get hired?

Friend: No. Again, it’s not that simple. It’s a competitive marketplace. They have to apply, but they probably won’t be chosen. They may have to apply to many jobs before they’re offered one, and it may not be the one they most wanted. Also, millions of people who want jobs can’t seem to get hired at all.

Me: This sounds very time consuming and stressful. What do they do if they can’t find a job?

Friend: Well, they have to mooch off someone else to get by… off the government, off a relationship partner, off a friend or family member.

Me: And what if they still can’t find a job, and no one lets them mooch anymore?

Friend: Then they might become homeless.

Me: That doesn’t sound too secure to me.

Friend: Well, most people don’t end up there. So it works okay overall. And being homeless isn’t as bad as it seems. People cope.

Me: Do most people like their jobs?

Friend: No, at least 80% don’t.

Me: So why do they keep going to work?

Friend: They need the money. And what choice do they have?

Me: They could earn money without a job.

Friend: Yeah, maybe… but who does that?

Me: I do.

Friend: Yeah, but you’re weird.

Me: I appreciate your sharing all of this, but in a world that considers this job thing normal, I think I’ll stick with my current approach, even if you think it’s weird. I enjoy the work I do, I get paid well whether I work or not, I can travel whenever I want, I don’t have a boss, I can’t be fired or laid off, I don’t feel I’m overpaying on taxes, I can do my best without feeling pressured to be mediocre, and if I’m working with someone and we get horny, we can shag the dickens out of each other and then go back to work with a smile… and no one gets sued. Best of all, I get to use Master as my official title.

Friend: Sure, that all sounds good, but most people can’t do it.

Me: Why not?

Friend: I don’t think most people are smart enough.

Me: There are lots of not-so-bright people earning passive income. You’d be amazed at how much mental capacity is freed up when you don’t have to deal with a boss or company politics… and when you don’t hold yourself back doing mediocre work instead of your best… and when you aren’t stressed about being potentially fired or laid off or having to be celibate.

Friend: True, but those people are weird too.

Me: Perhaps.

Friend: Also, passive income is way too complicated for most people.

Me: If people can handle all the complexities of jobs, I think they’ll find it a breeze to earn passive income. There’s no job hunting, no resume, no application, no boss, no company politics, no need to save up vacation time, no risk of being fired, no commuting, and lower taxes. Yes, there’s a different learning curve in the beginning, but if people can handle working for someone else, I think they can easily handle setting up passive income streams. And once they’ve done it once or twice, it’s pretty straightforward after that.

Friend: Well, I’m still skeptical, so I suggest you give this some further thought. Again, jobs are very popular. I think you should give it a try.

Me: Do you think I’d like it?

Friend: No, but you’ll get used to it. Trust me. It will all be fine. Again, it’s very popular.

Me: Maybe for the free coffee."
(This post was last modified: 08-30-2019 07:58 PM by newlife.)
08-30-2019 07:04 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Cobra Offline
True Player
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 2,614
Joined: Mar 2011
Reputation: 165
Post: #28
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-30-2019 07:04 PM)newlife Wrote:  
(08-30-2019 04:57 PM)Cobra Wrote:  Probably one of the stupidest articles out there. It's marketing, short and simple, to make more naive people believe they can stop working.

Truth is that you can gain valuable experience from working. The more people you work with the more the value. The more professional the environment the more the value. The more skilled people you're around the more the value. These are sometimes the same individuals that will open their own shop or own and/or manage another company. Good people to know.

Over many years of work experience, you can deduce cold hard facts about work environments and treating employees that you will otherwise screw up if you leave and start your own gig.

That being said if you're passionate about an idea or concept, go for it if you have the balls but don't expect some theories from this article to guide you. You will need to figure shit out on your own, piss people off in the process and learn the hard way. That's okay but most people are not cut out for it.

On the surface these threads can seem useful but it's just laziness disguised into a package of bullshit.

There are too many skilled professions you absolutely will gain nothing but valuable experience from. Don't be a pussy.

Do you think naive people will quit their jobs because of a motivational article? Do you not desire to see and live the total truth of what is here? To dare for what is possible instead of the easy and customary?

The defenders of toil and suffering have always baffled me! Like drowning men who desperately cling on to others who can still swim on further.

So you prefer to cap your learning to a few hours a day at a single place and from a small number of coworkers who after a decade or two might decide to go on to work for another place? LOL! Ok man. Just be careful because a regular job provides some built-in socialization, but if you think about it, you’ll see that it’s very limited. An employee can be fired for excessive socializing on the job. But a guy who is his own boss can socialize freely at any time of day.

So you think it is pussy to go off on your own and be independent huh? Out of curiosity to your reaction I just found another article by the same author which is both witty and thoughtful and reminds me of you:

"Many people have the limiting belief that passive income is weird, unusual, complicated, or confusing. As I’ve mentioned previously, passive income isn’t particularly difficult in practice. In many ways, earning a living through streams of passive income is easier than earning a living through a job or as an independent contractor, especially in the long run.

The difficult part has to do with getting comfortable with a passive income mindset.

To tackle this mindset issue, let’s turn this around and look at it from the other side.

Suppose you were already very comfortable with passive income, just like I am. Imagine that you had many thousands of dollars coming in every month, more than enough to cover all your expenses. Whether you work or not, fresh income keeps flowing to you month after month and year after year, based on streams you set up years ago.

Imagine that this is your normal everyday reality. You’ve already been living like this for more than a decade.

Now imagine that a friend with a regular job tries to convince you that what you’re doing is weird or unusual and that you should adopt his mindset, give up your passive income lifestyle, and get a regular job instead.

...tryhard wall of text

Looks like the guy that made this post already got banned for starting pointless threads like the one on Jessica Alba.

I hope you're not using long posts like this to convince "job lovers" to start their own business. Laugh You may be able to sell your wall of text to Trump.

I understand what it is like to be in a passive income situation and know what it means to run your own business or book of business in sales.

My problem is not with those that start building their own business. My problem is with baseless and green newbies like this coming on to the scene convincing others that they are foolish for not considering it. They're not better than anyone here or anyone that works for a living, which is the basis of their argument.

My point is that you need some variable or set of variables to get things going whether it's passion, capital, connections etc. "I need to be independent because working for someone is not cool" is not a reason.

Spittin' Cobra - A Podcast
Accounting Career Data Sheet |Finance datasheets- Part I /Part II/Part III | 5 Things To Do Before You Lose Your Job
08-31-2019 06:56 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 4 users Like Cobra's post:
Handsome Creepy Eel, JiggyLordJr, bucky, zatara
Cobra Offline
True Player
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 2,614
Joined: Mar 2011
Reputation: 165
Post: #29
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-30-2019 07:04 PM)newlife Wrote:  
(08-30-2019 04:57 PM)Cobra Wrote:  Probably one of the stupidest articles out there. It's marketing, short and simple, to make more naive people believe they can stop working.

Truth is that you can gain valuable experience from working. The more people you work with the more the value. The more professional the environment the more the value. The more skilled people you're around the more the value. These are sometimes the same individuals that will open their own shop or own and/or manage another company. Good people to know.

Over many years of work experience, you can deduce cold hard facts about work environments and treating employees that you will otherwise screw up if you leave and start your own gig.

That being said if you're passionate about an idea or concept, go for it if you have the balls but don't expect some theories from this article to guide you. You will need to figure shit out on your own, piss people off in the process and learn the hard way. That's okay but most people are not cut out for it.

On the surface these threads can seem useful but it's just laziness disguised into a package of bullshit.

There are too many skilled professions you absolutely will gain nothing but valuable experience from. Don't be a pussy.

Do you think naive people will quit their jobs because of a motivational article? Do you not desire to see and live the total truth of what is here? To dare for what is possible instead of the easy and customary?

The defenders of toil and suffering have always baffled me! Like drowning men who desperately cling on to others who can still swim on further.

So you prefer to cap your learning to a few hours a day at a single place and from a small number of coworkers who after a decade or two might decide to go on to work for another place? LOL! Ok man. Just be careful because a regular job provides some built-in socialization, but if you think about it, you’ll see that it’s very limited. An employee can be fired for excessive socializing on the job. But a guy who is his own boss can socialize freely at any time of day.

So you think it is pussy to go off on your own and be independent huh? Out of curiosity to your reaction I just found another article by the same author which is both witty and thoughtful and reminds me of you:

"Many people have the limiting belief that passive income is weird, unusual, complicated, or confusing. As I’ve mentioned previously, passive income isn’t particularly difficult in practice. In many ways, earning a living through streams of passive income is easier than earning a living through a job or as an independent contractor, especially in the long run.

The difficult part has to do with getting comfortable with a passive income mindset.

To tackle this mindset issue, let’s turn this around and look at it from the other side.

Suppose you were already very comfortable with passive income, just like I am. Imagine that you had many thousands of dollars coming in every month, more than enough to cover all your expenses. Whether you work or not, fresh income keeps flowing to you month after month and year after year, based on streams you set up years ago.

Imagine that this is your normal everyday reality. You’ve already been living like this for more than a decade.

Now imagine that a friend with a regular job tries to convince you that what you’re doing is weird or unusual and that you should adopt his mindset, give up your passive income lifestyle, and get a regular job instead.

If a job-loving friend did this with me, here’s what such a conversation might look like…

Friend: You know… you should join the world of real people and get a regular job. This passive income stuff you’re doing is just too strange.

Me: It seems to work well enough. What’s wrong with it?

Friend: Well… it’s not what most people do. Most people get jobs.

Me: How does that work?

Friend: Basically you go to work for some other company, usually a corporation. You do the work, and they give you a paycheck.

Me: Ok. Is my paycheck somehow based on the value I contribute?

Friend: More or less.

Me: So will I receive a fair amount relative to my contribution?

Friend: Depends on what you mean by fair. Obviously they’re not going to pay you 100% of what they think you’re contributing. They have to make a profit as well.

Me: Well do I get 80% of it or something like that?

Friend: Realistically it’s probably closer to 30%, but it’s not tracked that precisely. They don’t really know how much value you’re contributing relative to everyone else. On larger teams it’s especially difficult to know how much value any individual is contributing. So salaries invariably involve a lot of guesswork.

Me: Where does the rest of the value I create go?

Friend: It gets distributed in many different ways — as income to investors and stockholders, to company profits, to corporate taxes, to higher pay for officers, to various perks like company picnics, and so on. That’s for the higher-ups to decide, so it isn’t really up to you.

Me: Do I at least get a share of those company profits?

Friend: Not usually, although some companies do have a profit sharing plan, but even then they won’t share all the profits… usually less than half. Sometimes you’ll indirectly get a small cut, like in the form of a bonus.

Me: Hmmm… Do I have to work every day?

Friend: Usually just weekdays, but it depends on the job. You may also get a few weeks per year for vacation time.

Me: Only a few weeks? What if I want to travel for a month or two?

Friend: Well, you usually can’t. Maybe if you save up vacation time for a few years, then they would let you, but it’s not good to be gone so long at a stretch.

Me: Why does vacation time need to be saved up? Time passes on its own. If I can afford to go on vacation, why can’t I just go?

Friend: Because they need you to work.

Me: What if I’m burned out and don’t feel like working?

Friend: There’s free coffee.

Me: Good coffee or bad coffee?

Friend: Depends on the job, but there’s always a Starbucks nearby if they only serve Folgers in the office.

Me: Can I take my laptop to the Starbucks and work there?

Friend: Depends on the job, but usually not.

Me: Can I go on more vacations if I work from the road on my laptop now and then?

Friend: Not usually.

Me: Why not?

Friend: Well, they probably wouldn’t trust you to work if you’re out of the office too much.

Me: So they have to watch me work?

Friend: Basically yes. But also some jobs are collaborative, so they want everyone together in the same place.

Me: I often do work now that’s collaborative. We collaborate over the Internet or by phone.

Friend: Yup, some jobs are moving in that direction, but most employers still want you to show up each day.

Me: Where do I get to work?

Friend: That depends heavily on the type of job. For many office jobs, you’ll work in a cubicle.

Me: What’s a cubicle?

Friend: It’s a subdivision in a larger room, delineated by short fuzzy walls. You should have enough room for a desk and a chair. Typically you’ll have 50-80 square feet of space for yourself.

Me: So it’s like the Shire?

Friend: Pretty much, but usually not as green.

Me: My home office is about 200 square feet, and it has its own bathroom and shower. But I can work wherever I want, so I’m not confined to that space.

Friend: Yeah, you won’t get a space that size as a regular employee most likely, unless you work in management or some other high value job that warrants its own office. That isn’t what most employees get, but it isn’t out of the question. It just depends on the job.

Me: Do I get to pick my own job title?

Friend: Usually it’s assigned, but sometimes you can. It depends on the company.

Me: Can I pick Master?

Friend: Mmmm… probably not.

Me: What about the pay?

Friend: Well, you’d probably earn a lot less than you do now for doing the same kind of work. Just to give you an idea, the average salary for a blogger is about $17-38K per year (source).

Me: Wow… that’s a lot less than I earn now passively, even when I’m on vacation. How would I even live on that?

Friend: Other people get by on that much. You’d have to cut back quite a bit, especially since you’ll need more money for commuting (gas, car maintenance), professional work clothes if required, and various other expenses incurred by employees. But you might get a free company t-shirt and coffee mug and maybe a mouse pad if you’re lucky, so it sort of balances out.

Me: Ouch. But what if I could somehow earn the same amount I do now, but from a job instead of from passive income?

Friend: That would be very unlikely, but if you did manage that, you’d pay a lot more in taxes since this would all be W2 employee income. You can’t use your business like you do now to lower your taxes.

Me: How much more in taxes are we talking?

Friend: The extra taxes you’d pay would be enough to buy a new car every year.

Me: That doesn’t sound too appealing. Seems like it would be harder to get ahead if so much of each paycheck goes to taxes.

Friend: Yes, but the government understands this, so they make it look less painful by hiding a portion of those taxes, so it doesn’t seem like your income is being taxed as heavily. You never receive that part of your salary in the first place. Some of your taxes are disguised in the form of taxes paid by your employer, like the employer’s contribution to Social Security and Medicare for having you on the payroll. So even though your paycheck stub will report a certain base pay, your actual base pay (from your employer’s and the government’s perspective) is higher. You can bet that your employer is wanting to recoup those extra taxes from you in extra value you must contribute.

Me: I’m aware of this. U.S. tax laws are clearly hardest on regular W2 employees, who pay the highest taxes of anyone relative to their income. So why would people want to have their income allocated as W2?

Friend: Most people don’t know any better. Besides, they wouldn’t know what to do with all that extra money anyway. Lower pay keeps them out of trouble, and it ensures that they keep showing up for work. Gotta keep the economy going.

Me: Alright.

Friend: There are some job perks too.

Me: Like what?

Friend: You get health insurance.

Me: I have that now, but I hardly ever use it since I prefer to just stay healthy.

Friend: Well, you could afford to be less healthy if you had a job, and you wouldn’t have to pay for it.

Me: Hmmmm…

Friend: Free coffee too.

Me: You said that already.

Friend: Did I mention that you can have as much as you want?

Me: Ok. So what kind of work would I do at a regular job?

Friend: That depends on the job, but big picture… it’s usually something that supports the company’s goals.

Me: Who sets these goals?

Friend: At a well run company, the officers figure them out, with input from board members, key investors, and sometimes from employees too.

Me: Where can I see those goals?

Friend: Usually you don’t get to, but sometimes they’ll share snippets in the form of a company mission statement, a list of objectives, or perhaps a memo. But you’re not really going to know what the company’s true goals are. That’s normally shared on a need-to-know basis only, and most employees don’t need to know.

Me: Ok. So how do I know which goals to work on?

Friend: Usually your boss determines that, so you just do whatever your boss tells you.

Me: I have to have a boss?

Friend: Yup, everyone does. Even the CEO is accountable to the board and the shareholders.

Me: Ok, so what if my boss doesn’t do a very good job of telling me what to do?

Friend: That often happens. You muddle through. Just make sure you look busy when you’re being watched, and you should be ok. Personal accountability tends to be pretty low, so as long as you don’t stand out as being obviously idle, you’re probably safe.

Me: What if the boss and I disagree on how to achieve the company’s goals?

Friend: That’s where you start getting into company politics, which can be messy. Some people do what the boss says anyway, even when they know it won’t work. Other people try to push back or negotiate. Sometimes that works, but sometimes they get marginalized or even let go if the boss doesn’t like it. Usually people compromise somewhere in the middle.

Me: Are these compromises normally intelligent?

Friend: Not usually.

Me: If I do a good job of helping the company achieve its goals, do I get extra rewards for that?

Friend: Yes, sometimes. You might get a raise, a bonus, or a promotion. Or you might get intangible rewards like praise, appreciation, and recognition. Sometimes, however, you don’t get anything more than your base pay.

Me: How do promotions work?

Friend: You get a new job title and have more responsibility, which usually comes with higher pay. Sometimes it means longer hours too.

Me: What if I come up with a really great idea, but it’s not part of my assigned duties?

Friend: Umm… yeah… don’t do that.

Me: Why not?

Friend: You’ll just be a rabble rouser. The other employees won’t like it if you try to upstage them, and they’ll make your social life at work unpleasant till you back down.

Me: So if I try to work harder or smarter and get promoted faster, the other employees may try to hold me back?

Friend: Probably. Your boss may not like it very much either.

Me: My boss wouldn’t like it? Why not? Isn’t it part of his job to cultivate good talent?

Friend: Perhaps, but he wants to look good too. It’s not good for him if one of his underlings is outshining him.

Me: That doesn’t sound like an environment where I can really do my best work.

Friend: Yeah, but it’s all good. Fortunately your best isn’t required. You just need to get by. It’s actually easier this way.

Me: But if I know I’m not doing my best, then won’t I feel worse about myself? Won’t that lower my self-esteem?

Friend: Sure, but you get used to it. Everyone adapts.

Me: So what is it like to work with a group where no one is doing their best, and everyone thinks less of themselves and their coworkers because of it?

Friend: Pretty boring actually. But again, you get used to it. The free coffee helps it go down easier.

Me: Ok. So what about the sex?

Friend: What are you talking about?

Me: Well, if I’m with a female coworker, and we both get horny, then where do we go to take a shag break? Are there special rooms for that?

Friend: Oh no no no. That would be very much frowned upon. You could both get fired for that sort of thing.

Me: Fired? Why? What if it’s just a quickie and we still get all our work done?

Friend: Yeah, don’t do that. The company could get sued.

Me: Sued by whom?

Friend: Probably by the woman you had sex with.

Me: So if we have consensual sex, she would sue the company? For what?

Friend: Sexual harassment I guess. People have won millions of dollars doing that sort of thing.

Me: Ok, so I have to settle for blowjobs only then?

Friend: Goodness no. That’s just as bad.

Me: So what do people do if they get horny at work? People still get horny at their jobs, don’t they?

Friend: Sure… they get horny all the time. But they suppress it and pretend they’re not. Then they take care of themselves later, usually with Internet porn.

Me: People look at porn at their jobs?

Friend: Oh no. That’s frowned upon too. People could get fired for that as well.

Me: So basically while they’re at work, people still get horny, but they pretend to be asexual till they can take care of themselves later… like at home.

Friend: Yup, that’s pretty much it.

Me: Seems easier just to have a quickie, maybe take a short cuddle nap, and then go back to work refreshed and happy.

Friend: I’m pretty sure that’s illegal in a corporate setting.

Me: Ok, but those positive after-sex feelings make collaboration easier. Trying to suppress one’s sexual desires every day seems like it would be very distracting.

Friend: It is distracting of course, but remember that you aren’t expected to be too productive anyway, so it works out okay. And again, the free coffee helps with this as well.

Me: Ok, so let me get this straight. You’re suggesting that I shut down all my passive income streams, go to work for someone else, get a boss and do what he says even if his decisions are unintelligent, do mediocre work instead of my best, socialize with people who also do mediocre work, work longer hours for less pay, take fewer and shorter vacations and ask permission to take them, pay a great deal more in taxes, and on top of all of that… no sex?

Friend: Pretty much, yes. But you’re overlooking the security aspect.

Me: What’s secure about it?

Friend: Well, you’ll get a steady paycheck.

Me: How steady? Does it ever end?

Friend: Well sure it can end. You could get fired or laid off.

Me: Can I prevent myself from getting fired or laid off?

Friend: Not necessarily. It could happen due to circumstances beyond your control. Or you might just make a mistake. Or someone higher up may not like you.

Me: So how is that secure?

Friend: Well, it’s mostly secure.

Me: So if I get fired or laid off, how much residual income will I continue to get?

Friend: Usually none. You might get a severance package for certain jobs, but that’s only short-term for transitioning. For the most part, once your job ends, you stop getting paid.

Me: But currently I get paid whether I’m working or not. And I can’t be fired or laid off.

Friend: Yeah, that’s weird.

Me: Just feels normal to me.

Friend: Well, I know you’re kind of set in your ways, but jobs are very popular. They obviously work for lots of people.

Me: What about finding a job? Does everyone get one automatically?

Friend: Oh no. People have to seek them out and apply for them.

Me: How do they find jobs? Do they decide what they like doing and then find a job that lets them do it?

Friend: Usually it’s not that simple. Most of the time they have to see what’s available, and it probably won’t match perfectly with what they really like.

Me: And once they find a job and select it, then they get hired?

Friend: No. Again, it’s not that simple. It’s a competitive marketplace. They have to apply, but they probably won’t be chosen. They may have to apply to many jobs before they’re offered one, and it may not be the one they most wanted. Also, millions of people who want jobs can’t seem to get hired at all.

Me: This sounds very time consuming and stressful. What do they do if they can’t find a job?

Friend: Well, they have to mooch off someone else to get by… off the government, off a relationship partner, off a friend or family member.

Me: And what if they still can’t find a job, and no one lets them mooch anymore?

Friend: Then they might become homeless.

Me: That doesn’t sound too secure to me.

Friend: Well, most people don’t end up there. So it works okay overall. And being homeless isn’t as bad as it seems. People cope.

Me: Do most people like their jobs?

Friend: No, at least 80% don’t.

Me: So why do they keep going to work?

Friend: They need the money. And what choice do they have?

Me: They could earn money without a job.

Friend: Yeah, maybe… but who does that?

Me: I do.

Friend: Yeah, but you’re weird.

Me: I appreciate your sharing all of this, but in a world that considers this job thing normal, I think I’ll stick with my current approach, even if you think it’s weird. I enjoy the work I do, I get paid well whether I work or not, I can travel whenever I want, I don’t have a boss, I can’t be fired or laid off, I don’t feel I’m overpaying on taxes, I can do my best without feeling pressured to be mediocre, and if I’m working with someone and we get horny, we can shag the dickens out of each other and then go back to work with a smile… and no one gets sued. Best of all, I get to use Master as my official title.

Friend: Sure, that all sounds good, but most people can’t do it.

Me: Why not?

Friend: I don’t think most people are smart enough.

Me: There are lots of not-so-bright people earning passive income. You’d be amazed at how much mental capacity is freed up when you don’t have to deal with a boss or company politics… and when you don’t hold yourself back doing mediocre work instead of your best… and when you aren’t stressed about being potentially fired or laid off or having to be celibate.

Friend: True, but those people are weird too.

Me: Perhaps.

Friend: Also, passive income is way too complicated for most people.

Me: If people can handle all the complexities of jobs, I think they’ll find it a breeze to earn passive income. There’s no job hunting, no resume, no application, no boss, no company politics, no need to save up vacation time, no risk of being fired, no commuting, and lower taxes. Yes, there’s a different learning curve in the beginning, but if people can handle working for someone else, I think they can easily handle setting up passive income streams. And once they’ve done it once or twice, it’s pretty straightforward after that.

Friend: Well, I’m still skeptical, so I suggest you give this some further thought. Again, jobs are very popular. I think you should give it a try.

Me: Do you think I’d like it?

Friend: No, but you’ll get used to it. Trust me. It will all be fine. Again, it’s very popular.

Me: Maybe for the free coffee."

Agree 100%.

Spittin' Cobra - A Podcast
Accounting Career Data Sheet |Finance datasheets- Part I /Part II/Part III | 5 Things To Do Before You Lose Your Job
08-31-2019 07:03 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Captain Gh Offline
True Player
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,829
Joined: Feb 2013
Reputation: 16
Post: #30
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
OP got banned... and that's a thing that I hate hate hate from brilliant men like him! Could really help us out... but they see things in absolute, which drives people further away instead of rallying them! Exactly why the Red Pill is easier to swallow coming from the Pick Up community than the political / conspiracy community.

The charisma of peeps like Roosh, Juggler, and to a smaller extend Daviv D, acted as the bridge between gettin laid and brutally realizing how things really are until one was ready to see the patterns, like in a Game of chess. Business savvy MJ DeMarco is unfortunately in the same mold!


To give a tidbit away for those who were interested in the POV ( whoa where did I get this acronym from ?) of the OP... The main reason why peeps truly interested in wealth should start their own thing is the Multiplier => When selling an asset, the asking price is related to the ESTIMATED revenue the Business will bring.

For example a Doctor whose been able to generate an average of 60k for himself (very low for a Dr I know... but just an exemple) When he'll sell, he'll be able to ask for up to 15x it's value... and then he's set. Of course that's easy to write... doing the above is another story!
08-31-2019 12:06 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Captain Gh's post:
Kurgan
Ice Offline
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 430
Joined: Aug 2013
Reputation: 2
Post: #31
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-31-2019 12:06 PM)Captain Gh Wrote:  OP got banned... and that's a thing that I hate hate hate from brilliant men like him! Could really help us out...

It's really a mystery to me why you would say something like that. OP was a nerd who had no idea what he was talking about. I think everyone agrees that it's better to have 100k passive per year than being an employee earning 70k per year. But where is the value linking to these articles that provide nothing actionable but only pumping people's emotions. "Job bad, business good". Yeah sure, now the question is what kind of business are you going to start and how. Of course it's very possible to launch a successful business. No doubt about that. But these dorky articles about how shitty being an employee is are helping no one.
08-31-2019 08:22 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 3 users Like Ice's post:
joost, JiggyLordJr, bucky
Cobra Offline
True Player
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 2,614
Joined: Mar 2011
Reputation: 165
Post: #32
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
My last post was supposed to quote whitewashedblackguy. I messed that up.

Anyways..

(08-31-2019 08:22 PM)Ice Wrote:  
(08-31-2019 12:06 PM)Captain Gh Wrote:  OP got banned... and that's a thing that I hate hate hate from brilliant men like him! Could really help us out...

It's really a mystery to me why you would say something like that. OP was a nerd who had no idea what he was talking about. I think everyone agrees that it's better to have 100k passive per year than being an employee earning 70k per year. But where is the value linking to these articles that provide nothing actionable but only pumping people's emotions. "Job bad, business good". Yeah sure, now the question is what kind of business are you going to start and how. Of course it's very possible to launch a successful business. No doubt about that. But these dorky articles about how shitty being an employee is are helping no one.

This.

Believe it or not. Many of the C suite executives at large companies are coming from employee ranks. They just happen to manage their career like a business instead of working for a living.

Again, there are way too many variables to this subject.

I truly don't envy those single guys living somewhere in Thailand or Vietnam running their "Internet based business" slaying Asian tang left and right. I would rather be where I am and raise my family with better infrastructure and resources. So no thanks.

Spittin' Cobra - A Podcast
Accounting Career Data Sheet |Finance datasheets- Part I /Part II/Part III | 5 Things To Do Before You Lose Your Job
(This post was last modified: 08-31-2019 09:23 PM by Cobra.)
08-31-2019 09:17 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Cobra's post:
bucky
Swordfish1010 Online
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 343
Joined: Oct 2018
Reputation: 4
Post: #33
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-25-2019 09:18 PM)uhriginal Wrote:  Thanks Romulus, now post some ideas other than having a job

Bitcoin Investor.
08-31-2019 10:00 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Swordfish1010 Online
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 343
Joined: Oct 2018
Reputation: 4
Post: #34
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-30-2019 05:16 PM)whitewashedblackguy Wrote:  
(08-30-2019 04:57 PM)Cobra Wrote:  Probably one of the stupidest articles out there. It's marketing, short and simple, to make more naive people believe they can stop working.

Truth is that you can gain valuable experience from working. The more people you work with the more the value. The more professional the environment the more the value. The more skilled people you're around the more the value. These are sometimes the same individuals that will open their own shop or own and/or manage another company. Good people to know.

Over many years of work experience you can deduce cold hard facts about work environments and treating employees that you will otherwise screw up if you leave and start your own gig.

That being said if you're passionate about an idea or concept, go for it if you have the balls but don't expect some theories from this article to guide you. You will need to figure shit out on your own, piss people off in the process and learn the hard way. That's okay but most people are not cut out for it.

On the surface these threads can seem useful but it's just laziness disguised into a package of bullshit.

There are too many skilled professions you absolutely will gain nothing but valuable experience from. Don't be a pussy.

I can see where it seems like a lazy pov, but I feel like the article comes from a low-skilled labor point of view. If you don't have a skill that you can take out on your own, a skill where you can be easily replaced or a skill that might soon be worthless (driving jobs...) then you're fucked. An underwater welder is a lot harder to replace than a guy flipping burgers at McDonald's. Having multiple sources of income is always a plus too.

Trading time for money for sure isn't the worst thing in the world, as long as it's top dollar you're trading your time for. The far better plan is to get paid based on results though.
A lot of blue collar jobs like hvac or plumber will be safe for a while. It will be easier for AI to replace most lawyers or other cognitive functions. A computer will be able to parse through all case law and use machine learning to identify patterns and provide court advice before a plumber robot drives to your house to unclog the toilet.
08-31-2019 10:42 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Swordfish1010 Online
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 343
Joined: Oct 2018
Reputation: 4
Post: #35
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
There is a lot of truth to the original post but yeah it’s not easy and it is not for everyone. Most people are better suited to be employees.
08-31-2019 10:43 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Cobra Offline
True Player
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 2,614
Joined: Mar 2011
Reputation: 165
Post: #36
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
Well even I was reading the article and actually enjoying it, until this stupidity regarding sex in the workplace. Some guys have no idea what the red pill means and I think they imagine this shit up behind a keyboard.

Quote:Me: Ok. So what about the sex?

Friend: What are you talking about?

Me: Well, if I’m with a female coworker, and we both get horny, then where do we go to take a shag break? Are there special rooms for that?

Friend: Oh no no no. That would be very much frowned upon. You could both get fired for that sort of thing.

Me: Fired? Why? What if it’s just a quickie and we still get all our work done?

Friend: Yeah, don’t do that. The company could get sued.

Me: Sued by whom?

Friend: Probably by the woman you had sex with.

Me: So if we have consensual sex, she would sue the company? For what?

Friend: Sexual harassment I guess. People have won millions of dollars doing that sort of thing.

Me: Ok, so I have to settle for blowjobs only then?

Friend: Goodness no. That’s just as bad.

Me: So what do people do if they get horny at work? People still get horny at their jobs, don’t they?

Friend: Sure… they get horny all the time. But they suppress it and pretend they’re not. Then they take care of themselves later, usually with Internet porn.

Me: People look at porn at their jobs?

Friend: Oh no. That’s frowned upon too. People could get fired for that as well.

Me: So basically while they’re at work, people still get horny, but they pretend to be asexual till they can take care of themselves later… like at home.

Friend: Yup, that’s pretty much it.

Me: Seems easier just to have a quickie, maybe take a short cuddle nap, and then go back to work refreshed and happy.

Friend: I’m pretty sure that’s illegal in a corporate setting.

Me: Ok, but those positive after-sex feelings make collaboration easier. Trying to suppress one’s sexual desires every day seems like it would be very distracting.

Spittin' Cobra - A Podcast
Accounting Career Data Sheet |Finance datasheets- Part I /Part II/Part III | 5 Things To Do Before You Lose Your Job
(This post was last modified: 09-01-2019 10:57 AM by Cobra.)
09-01-2019 10:55 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
TheFinalEpic Offline
True Player
*****
Gold Member

Posts: 1,533
Joined: Apr 2014
Reputation: 26
Post: #37
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
Anyone selling you any sort of "passive income" is lying, or telling half truths at best. You have to work your ass off to accumulate money to buy "passive" assets, and even then, there is some management of them. I think that we all must realize that work is a beautiful thing, I would blow my brains out if I was laying on a beach all day living on 50k passive, but to each his own.

The fetishism of not working is one of the major contributions to the downfall of society. If you love what you are doing, you will be working all the time, with taking no days off, because it's actually blissful. But you need to find what that is for yourself. I do not see eye to eye with people that hate their jobs or worse - their own businesses.

"Money over bitches, nigga stick to the script." - Jay-Z
They gonna love me for my ambition.
09-01-2019 09:03 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 6 users Like TheFinalEpic's post:
doc holliday, lonewolf1992, Lone Wolf, bucky, mr_ks, WanderingFlame
tonysoprano Offline
Game Denialist

Posts: 51
Joined: May 2017
Reputation: 1
Post: #38
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(09-01-2019 09:03 PM)TheFinalEpic Wrote:  Anyone selling you any sort of "passive income" is lying, or telling half truths at best. You have to work your ass off to accumulate money to buy "passive" assets, and even then, there is some management of them. I think that we all must realize that work is a beautiful thing, I would blow my brains out if I was laying on a beach all day living on 50k passive, but to each his own.

The fetishism of not working is one of the major contributions to the downfall of society. If you love what you are doing, you will be working all the time, with taking no days off, because it's actually blissful. But you need to find what that is for yourself. I do not see eye to eye with people that hate their jobs or worse - their own businesses.

I agree with most of what you said here but I think you're misunderstanding what "passive income" refers to. It's not pressing a button or following a simple 10 step plan then sitting back and watching the cash roll in. Obviously that doesn't exist or everyone would be doing it. That's what a lot of gurus peddle and people do fall for it.

What you're right about is that it takes massive amounts of hard work up front to reach a point where your income is passive. Even then you have to manage it to an extent. But if you have 10m banked from the sale of a company and you invest that money, with just 5% growth in your portfolio you are profiting 500k passively before taxes per year. When you have money you can make it work for you, for perhaps only an hour or two of maintenance per week, if that.

What passive income does for you is it frees up your time so you can work on what you want to work on. People who have reached financial freedom don't sit on a beach all day sipping cocktails. That's what the gurus want you to think because they are selling that dream, not the true fruits of the labor (they are selling the easy way out).

Financially free people pursue whatever it is they want - hobbies, more time with family and friends, pursuing a cause greater than themself like starting a charity, the list goes on. People who work full-time jobs just don't have the luxury to do that to the extent someone with passive income does. If they hate what they're doing and burn out, they may not have any energy at all to enjoy anything outside of work.

You bring up a good point about "doing what you love", but the problem with that is what you love may not be what the market demands. You may love making origami or learning different languages but the odds of making a suitable living doing those things are slim to none. Not to mention you run the risk of losing interest in the very activity that you love because you're no longer doing it for the love of it, but for the pursuit of profits. There are countless examples of this. For this reason I believe it's best not to mix business and pleasure in most cases.

My opinion is that most people who crave the freedom to do what they love are better off serving a market, making lots of money doing so, cashing out, and letting their money work for them while they bask in the freedom of being able to do whatever the hell they want, whenever they want.

This is what most people don't understand and why there's a negative visceral reaction when their views about holding a regular job and the status quo are challenged.
09-02-2019 12:58 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 4 users Like tonysoprano's post:
TheFinalEpic, whitewashedblackguy, SlickyBoy, Captain Gh
Vladimir Poontang Online
True Player
*****

Posts: 1,541
Joined: Feb 2017
Reputation: 27
Post: #39
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
It's probably more productive to find a way to make an income in a way that is fulfilling rather than passive. Earning $100 p.h. doing something you like doesn't sound like a bad deal to me.

That's not how we do things in Russia, comrade.

http://inspiredentrepreneur.weebly.com/
(This post was last modified: 09-02-2019 03:44 AM by Vladimir Poontang.)
09-02-2019 03:44 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes Vladimir Poontang's post:
tomzestatlu
tonysoprano Offline
Game Denialist

Posts: 51
Joined: May 2017
Reputation: 1
Post: #40
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(09-02-2019 03:44 AM)Vladimir Poontang Wrote:  It's probably more productive to find a way to make an income in a way that is fulfilling rather than passive. Earning $100 p.h. doing something you like doesn't sound like a bad deal to me.

You know what's also fulfilling? Delivering massive value to a market and getting value back in exchange (aka profits). Bonus: all the work you put in up front allows you to decouple your time from your income.

Sure doing work you love is fulfilling but over time it loses its appeal when you are constantly chasing the next paycheck without a separation from your time.
09-02-2019 01:23 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes tonysoprano's post:
whitewashedblackguy
Vladimir Poontang Online
True Player
*****

Posts: 1,541
Joined: Feb 2017
Reputation: 27
Post: #41
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(09-02-2019 01:23 PM)tonysoprano Wrote:  
(09-02-2019 03:44 AM)Vladimir Poontang Wrote:  It's probably more productive to find a way to make an income in a way that is fulfilling rather than passive. Earning $100 p.h. doing something you like doesn't sound like a bad deal to me.

You know what's also fulfilling? Delivering massive value to a market and getting value back in exchange (aka profits). Bonus: all the work you put in up front allows you to decouple your time from your income.

Sure doing work you love is fulfilling but over time it loses its appeal when you are constantly chasing the next paycheck without a separation from your time.

Sure. I was just giving an alternative appealing scenario to the one of passive income. If you can earn money passively, great, but if not, if you enjoy what you're doing then that's not a bad way to exchange your time for money. Giving value is of course a given, pun intended.

That's not how we do things in Russia, comrade.

http://inspiredentrepreneur.weebly.com/
(This post was last modified: 09-02-2019 05:47 PM by Vladimir Poontang.)
09-02-2019 05:46 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
bucky Offline
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 412
Joined: Nov 2015
Reputation: 3
Post: #42
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(08-31-2019 08:22 PM)Ice Wrote:  
(08-31-2019 12:06 PM)Captain Gh Wrote:  OP got banned... and that's a thing that I hate hate hate from brilliant men like him! Could really help us out...

It's really a mystery to me why you would say something like that. OP was a nerd who had no idea what he was talking about. I think everyone agrees that it's better to have 100k passive per year than being an employee earning 70k per year. But where is the value linking to these articles that provide nothing actionable but only pumping people's emotions. "Job bad, business good". Yeah sure, now the question is what kind of business are you going to start and how. Of course it's very possible to launch a successful business. No doubt about that. But these dorky articles about how shitty being an employee is are helping no one.

Agreed. Being a successful entrepreneur or business owner is great, but Americans have this amazing ability to see the 2% or so who are successful and totally miss the other 98%, while also missing the hard work most of the 2% had to put in.

Feminism in ten words: "Stop objectifying women! Can't you see I've hit the wall?" -Leonard D Neubache
09-02-2019 07:46 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes bucky's post:
SlickyBoy
whitewashedblackguy Offline
Recovering Beta
*

Posts: 203
Joined: Sep 2018
Reputation: 4
Post: #43
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
(09-02-2019 01:23 PM)tonysoprano Wrote:  
(09-02-2019 03:44 AM)Vladimir Poontang Wrote:  It's probably more productive to find a way to make an income in a way that is fulfilling rather than passive. Earning $100 p.h. doing something you like doesn't sound like a bad deal to me.

You know what's also fulfilling? Delivering massive value to a market and getting value back in exchange (aka profits). Bonus: all the work you put in up front allows you to decouple your time from your income.

Sure doing work you love is fulfilling but over time it loses its appeal when you are constantly chasing the next paycheck without a separation from your time.

I like the way you think. People don't get a 'passive' income from being lazy. They get it for providing something that the marketplace feels is valuable, and making sure people can find said valuable product.

African-Americans were horrified that the history of their ancestors was being, quite literally, whitewashed.
(This post was last modified: 09-03-2019 09:55 AM by whitewashedblackguy.)
09-03-2019 09:52 AM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[-] The following 1 user Likes whitewashedblackguy's post:
tonysoprano
qwertyuiop Online
Chubby Chaser
**

Posts: 257
Joined: Nov 2016
Reputation: 0
Post: #44
RE: 10 reasons you should never get a job
Ya, totally. I've been a complete schmuck working a job.

Just gonna wake up tomorrow and run my 100k passive business. Ez
Yesterday 07:10 PM
Find all posts by this user Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | RooshV.com | Return to Top | Return to Content | Mobile Version | RSS Syndication