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Saved From A Single Mother Household
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Manbeline Offline
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Saved From A Single Mother Household
Today, I just fought off a big part of my psychological obstacle that is my mother. Though she was asking for money, she was also making use of the last remnants of my attachment to her that was born from being in a single mother household. Throughout a lot of the early parts of my life, she directed everything in it, all the way up to college. Thankfully, by high school I had enough intellect to go to the right major in a STEM field, but even then, things went south as the grips of my mother cost me my education. Only after a lot of hard work have I ascended to a position that places me as the first person in my family to make near six digits. I say near because the government eats the hell out of my money. This truth alone has taught me the value of why less government is better and how invasive taxes are, as before I was nothing but a welfare puppet. I took it all for granted before I got into this income bracket. Why this is all important, I want to send you all through an anecdotal trip of my life that is the general metaphor of all things wrong with the world today and the positions people in different situations are directed through their life. Afterwards, I want to know how your lives have shaped you in terms of the cultural shift that has decimated the western life. It's a lot, but I really needed to write this after the shit I had went through in my life, and this recent circumstance that just straight up made me look at where I've been and how I got here out of the shittiness that is a single mother household.

I was born into a single parent household in southern USA, among many african americans. During your childhood, your environment and the people around you shape you later into who you become. I had the benefit of my mother having a family on one side, and my father having one on the other. And so, despite the lack of a stable household, each side helped in raising me. As a kid, you do not understand a lot about how the world works. You only know what you experience, and from there, you build certain expectations and beliefs. My mother’s family was not well off, as they lived in the country and were former members of a plantation, though my grandmother eventually got herself into a lower middle class status. My mom lived in the city, fortunately. My father’s side, the grandparents were a lot more knowledgeable of money, so they had better living conditions, life luxuries, and their own house. They were what I would describe a real middle class. And because my grandparents on this side of the family taught their children the value of money and working, the aunts and uncles ended up a lot better than on my mother’s family side.

We were always bored when we had to go to our less off relatives on my mother's side. Yet, when we went to our father’s relatives, we were always excited. This dynamic was the start of pushing me toward “civilized” behavior. You see, being in my mother’s house, I was absorbing things that is not good for a young male. For example, my mother was always yelling into her corded phone, demanding one of her children’s father to pay up the child support they owe. That anger was often redirected to her children, including myself. Being the oldest, I had to take the bulk of it. A lot of responsibilities were pushed onto me, too, mostly child watching while my mother would go off and work or do something with her friends. There were times when she wouldn't come home until late night. If a father was home, she would not be going out and hanging with her friends trying to find men to be with.

Welfare is a funny thing. For a while of my life, I never thought about it other than us getting free money to use for food and housing. That is how I interpreted anyway with my inexperienced mind. I would find out later that my mother was extremely bad with money, which explains why we moved around a lot to different houses, and had different vehicles. Tax refund season in my community meant people go out and spurge on stuff as they feel the amount of money in their hands that they never had before. If you’re used to living off just $100 to $300 a paycheck in money after bills, imagine suddenly seeing $3000 in your hands. That is how life went really. I came to wonder why we were always poor despite getting money. Was life really so expensive? I never thought that maybe it was my mom living above her means. I am only a kid in a single mother household after all.

I was a special kid. By special, I mean I was born needing a lot of attention. I was clumsy and wild, as far as what my old home videos showed. I messed with everything and always had a curiosity about stuff. This curiosity came to full form when I discovered cartoons, movies, tv, and video games, which started me down a path of creativity. The benefit of not having access to a lot of entertainment is that we had to focus on making our own. And for me, that meant drawing and writing a lot, imagining the worlds that I could create or situations based on the stimulus of the entertainment around me. One thing we did was obviously play outside with the kids. I got my share of bumps, bruises, and sometimes beatings from learning the dynamics of being around other people. For that, I am thankful that I at least got a healthy social development as far as psyche was concerned. It toughened me up, though I was still not tough enough to grow from a boy to a man. After all, the person directing most of my life was still my single mother. All the habits she had, I was developing. I learned a lot of feminine behavior, like getting angry easily, having explicit feelings, and believing that just because I grew up learning a lot of women stuff from my mother and my sisters, that it made me somehow a female specialist. I even did the most beta thing and bragged to girls about this. “Yeah, I know about that lipstick or that perfume.” It’s a wonder that I did not become gay with all the female orientated entertainment often coming from being around my mother. From female movies, female music, to female stuff in general.

I won’t bore you with my entire life story. What happens then is that I end up hating being at home with my mom and my siblings. I was very good at school. I would focus all my energy on the books I was given. I could read a 300 page book in a couple of days. I was good at logically understanding math. Science made sense. History was just another book to me. At the time, the advent of the internet was taking off. I was becoming a computer geek, but only at school. We were too poor to have our own until sometime around middle school when I managed to buy one from a thrift store.

There was one problem: although I was considered smart, I had a bad attitude problem. This came from me using the anger my mother would give to me and venting it to the people around me, just like she did. This is a very important part of the story because it demonstrates the usual mannerisms kids from single mother childhoods pick up. At this point of my life, I really could have become a degenerate troublemaker, as I caused quite the destructive tantrums. I fortunately did not, but think of the many that did. I can’t count the times I went to the council or principal office in my elementary years. My mother was advised by various instructors and school officials to send me to better schools as I was called a “gifted child.” To them, I was just someone who didn't have the right environment to focus my intelligence. I was getting high grades despite being destructive. Because of my love for visual arts, I was one of the best artists in every grade of my class. I could fill a notebook with imaginative drawings in a week. I use to have a room full of papers with all my cartoons and other doodles. I drew people, animals, you name it. You learn later that I ended up going down a different career, but it is still my hobby.

Realistically, education at more white orientated schools were a lot better than black focused ones. Or I should say, low income schools. My mother did acknowledge my intelligence and tried to always put me in middle-class schools where more white kids went. She would drive us how many miles she needed to have us get a good education from there. I have a feeling this was pushed more by my mother’s mother than herself. This part becomes important, too, because my years before graduating from high school was ups and downs of going to low income and middle-class income schools. I finished 12th grade at a low income school that had enough clout to at least sponsor some top educated kids, who were mostly white of course. White people vs black people dynamic is so interesting. I’ve been pounded from all sides with that narrative my entire life. I think what made me resistant against it is that I was a logical person and very academically focused. I didn’t care for all the unimportant social babble people said around me. I just wanted to study, become successful, get a good family, and not be poor ever again. I hated my mother and I hated the life we lived.

I was an artist, but I was also a self taught computer geek. In senior year, it was time for me to choose what degree I will take before going to college. If I had a time machine, this would be the moment in my life where I would like to go to and make myself do something entirely different. You see, I did some ignorant mistakes. I listened to my school councilor, who told me to go to our nearest major state college and to do it soon. They had a damn good program for what I was pursuing, don’t get me wrong. The reason this was a mistake was because of ignorance. I had no knowledge of what I was about to get to. I was not ready to go to college, neither financially or intelligently. Being in a single mother household, I was incomplete as a man of wisdom. I was still a child and no way would I have survived in college. This goes for most people from low-class families: it just doesn't work.

College ended up being the biggest turning point of my life, and made me come running smack into the wall created by blue pill ideology. If I had a better education at that point, I would have delayed going to college and pursued the growing internet tech industry. I knew how to make websites, program java applets, use C++, you name it. If I just had the right people and business sense, I could have started off the next chapter of my life so much easier than I did. But alas, I went to low-class schools and I grew up in a single mother household.

Go to a dorm. Go to your classes at different times. Manage your own life. Sounds like every kid’s dream, but like all kids, we were idiots. My life took a hellish turn and is the first time I felt big depression. You see, normally in all the public schools I went to, everything is provided to you, so all I have to do is show up and learn. In college, housing, food, and most of all, course materials have to come from you. My family was not wealthy, so I had to take out grants and loans. I was unable to get any scholarships despite being academically praised. So much for those ethnic scholarships they advertised. I got not a single one. This was important because it had me do something I never done before: fail classes. To do homework and course material, you needed to be able to access lessons and read. This was easy back in government funded public school. But in college, I did not have that anymore. Yes, I did get enough money for housing and course materials. And yes I did take out loans, which was also a big mistake, but again, I was not educated enough about money.

What happened to that money? Why could I not afford housing and books like I was supposed to? Think back to earlier when I said what happens when low income houses suddenly get an influx of money. My mother was in charge of my bank account. If you cringed here, you're right to do so. I ended up in debt and failing classes. Because I couldn’t pay for books, I started to become more depressed. I would stay up late into the morning and wake up late. I was skipping classes. The depression would last for the next five years. There was a time after I got out of this where I had a couple of nightmares of me being behind on my workload and getting Fs across the board. Or that I had woke up late and missed my math class again. I was failing exams. Real PTSD shit. The only classes I passed were my computer science classes. I knew most of the material before coming to college from learning on my own. Everything else I failed cause I just didn't have the knowledge from books that I could not buy. And although I was good at math, I couldn't beat calculus with my current state of mind and without the aid of multiple hours of studying from a book.

Eventually, I got academic suspension and school debt. And until I paid that debt off, I was not allowed to continue school or get financial aid. I had descended back into poverty like my mother, let her run my money, had to take a shitty job, and lived homeless due to not being able to pay rent, sleeping off people’s couches. At this part of the story, this is where most people's life ends. I saw many people like myself who had come from similar backgrounds of poverty who let their parents run their lives and they end up poor themselves. It was such a sad thing to see, whether it was in the financial office or in my dorm. I was forced to move back in with my mother after this and for a moment, I was stuck in what one would call a deadbeat life. Cue once again the anger tempers from my mother, the poverty of our household, etc. Just because I lived in a single mother household.

I took up a minimum wage job at a college bookstore and just tried to live. I would still try to read books at the college library I was no longer a student at. And though I was saving money little by little, I still lived with my mom. My money was her money. I would still be doing this were it not for one saving grace: a phone call. In college, I did not waste a lot of my time. I became friends with smart individuals. People that thought like I did. Two of them knew my situation and asked if I could come live with them as a roommate. They acknowledged how skillful I was, and wanted to help me get back into college. They also knew I was unhappy in my current predicament. So I saved up money to prepare for my move. And when I had enough, I went right back to my college town. There, I would work and start saving money to pay back my school’s debt.

As I said, I never got a college degree and yet I ended up getting into a very good job. This happened for a few reasons. One, I took up web development as a side job. Two, I eventually started a small tech company with one of my friends who saw my skills. And three, after gaining skills and a network, I had enough credentials to get myself a near six digit salary. This all could have been easily done if I had just the right upbringing and circumstances, but sometimes you just have to go through the hard way to reach what you should be at. What annoys me to this day is that it took me ten years longer to get to where I should have been had I graduated college properly. Instead, I was set back by many years on my career simply due to the drudge that is living in a single mother household.

I hated my mother and throughout this time, I have done everything to minimize every possible contact with her down to not even talking to her occasionally. People would ask me why I don’t speak with my mom and I remain silent. Truth is I don’t want to speak to her. She has ruined a large part of my life and if I let her back in again as the “lovable son”, my life will instantly go back to a depression pot of poverty and despair. And yet I still keep our contact and she contacts me once in a while. Often asking for money. And recently, a large sum of money that I needed to convince her that I would not give. I did my best to hide the fact I was making a lot of money because if she found out, she would be reaching for the hills again. It seems she never will change. I do not hate her in the real sense any longer. Being a man means holding no anger to anyone and to focus only on your life and emotions. And today, I survived every single guilt trip she could send at me. I could feel the tiny remnant tug on my soul of the chains she held on me throughout my life. But as I sit here and sigh, I feel relieved. That I can sit here, say no, and forget her. I will mourn her the day she dies, but all of my experience and instincts told me to not submit to her. My life is not worth her momentary bad decisions.

And yet, millions of other people are in this situation where they are tied down by welfare, their mothers, and debt in general. They are depressed, have nowhere to go, no way out, and are drowning themselves in vices to give them a momentary relapse from their slavery. Crime escalates. Degeneracy goes out of control. Government power rises to fix the problems the government started in the first place. A spiral of depression that leads to fall out of cities, societies, and economy. And all because one boy or girl were born in a single mother household. Nay, at this point, I would replace the term single mother household with government household. And just like government funded roads, a government funded family is just as shitty.

Welfare is slavery. Single mothers are parasites. Colleges are traps for anyone but those with high IQs and lots of money (I wasn't any of them). Debt sucks. Education is important, but it doesn't have to be from a public school.
(This post was last modified: 09-02-2019 06:51 PM by Manbeline.)
09-02-2019 06:49 PM
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RE: Saved From A Single Mother Household
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09-02-2019 07:24 PM
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RE: Saved From A Single Mother Household
(09-02-2019 06:49 PM)Manbeline Wrote:  Today, I just fought off a big part of my psychological obstacle that is my mother. Though she was asking for money, she was also making use of the last remnants of my attachment to her that was born from being in a single mother household. Throughout a lot of the early parts of my life, she directed everything in it, all the way up to college. Thankfully, by high school I had enough intellect to go to the right major in a STEM field, but even then, things went south as the grips of my mother cost me my education. Only after a lot of hard work have I ascended to a position that places me as the first person in my family to make near six digits. I say near because the government eats the hell out of my money. This truth alone has taught me the value of why less government is better and how invasive taxes are, as before I was nothing but a welfare puppet. I took it all for granted before I got into this income bracket. Why this is all important, I want to send you all through an anecdotal trip of my life that is the general metaphor of all things wrong with the world today and the positions people in different situations are directed through their life. Afterwards, I want to know how your lives have shaped you in terms of the cultural shift that has decimated the western life. It's a lot, but I really needed to write this after the shit I had went through in my life, and this recent circumstance that just straight up made me look at where I've been and how I got here out of the shittiness that is a single mother household.

I was born into a single parent household in southern USA, among many african americans. During your childhood, your environment and the people around you shape you later into who you become. I had the benefit of my mother having a family on one side, and my father having one on the other. And so, despite the lack of a stable household, each side helped in raising me. As a kid, you do not understand a lot about how the world works. You only know what you experience, and from there, you build certain expectations and beliefs. My mother’s family was not well off, as they lived in the country and were former members of a plantation, though my grandmother eventually got herself into a lower middle class status. My mom lived in the city, fortunately. My father’s side, the grandparents were a lot more knowledgeable of money, so they had better living conditions, life luxuries, and their own house. They were what I would describe a real middle class. And because my grandparents on this side of the family taught their children the value of money and working, the aunts and uncles ended up a lot better than on my mother’s family side.

We were always bored when we had to go to our less off relatives on my mother's side. Yet, when we went to our father’s relatives, we were always excited. This dynamic was the start of pushing me toward “civilized” behavior. You see, being in my mother’s house, I was absorbing things that is not good for a young male. For example, my mother was always yelling into her corded phone, demanding one of her children’s father to pay up the child support they owe. That anger was often redirected to her children, including myself. Being the oldest, I had to take the bulk of it. A lot of responsibilities were pushed onto me, too, mostly child watching while my mother would go off and work or do something with her friends. There were times when she wouldn't come home until late night. If a father was home, she would not be going out and hanging with her friends trying to find men to be with.

Welfare is a funny thing. For a while of my life, I never thought about it other than us getting free money to use for food and housing. That is how I interpreted anyway with my inexperienced mind. I would find out later that my mother was extremely bad with money, which explains why we moved around a lot to different houses, and had different vehicles. Tax refund season in my community meant people go out and spurge on stuff as they feel the amount of money in their hands that they never had before. If you’re used to living off just $100 to $300 a paycheck in money after bills, imagine suddenly seeing $3000 in your hands. That is how life went really. I came to wonder why we were always poor despite getting money. Was life really so expensive? I never thought that maybe it was my mom living above her means. I am only a kid in a single mother household after all.

I was a special kid. By special, I mean I was born needing a lot of attention. I was clumsy and wild, as far as what my old home videos showed. I messed with everything and always had a curiosity about stuff. This curiosity came to full form when I discovered cartoons, movies, tv, and video games, which started me down a path of creativity. The benefit of not having access to a lot of entertainment is that we had to focus on making our own. And for me, that meant drawing and writing a lot, imagining the worlds that I could create or situations based on the stimulus of the entertainment around me. One thing we did was obviously play outside with the kids. I got my share of bumps, bruises, and sometimes beatings from learning the dynamics of being around other people. For that, I am thankful that I at least got a healthy social development as far as psyche was concerned. It toughened me up, though I was still not tough enough to grow from a boy to a man. After all, the person directing most of my life was still my single mother. All the habits she had, I was developing. I learned a lot of feminine behavior, like getting angry easily, having explicit feelings, and believing that just because I grew up learning a lot of women stuff from my mother and my sisters, that it made me somehow a female specialist. I even did the most beta thing and bragged to girls about this. “Yeah, I know about that lipstick or that perfume.” It’s a wonder that I did not become gay with all the female orientated entertainment often coming from being around my mother. From female movies, female music, to female stuff in general.

I won’t bore you with my entire life story. What happens then is that I end up hating being at home with my mom and my siblings. I was very good at school. I would focus all my energy on the books I was given. I could read a 300 page book in a couple of days. I was good at logically understanding math. Science made sense. History was just another book to me. At the time, the advent of the internet was taking off. I was becoming a computer geek, but only at school. We were too poor to have our own until sometime around middle school when I managed to buy one from a thrift store.

There was one problem: although I was considered smart, I had a bad attitude problem. This came from me using the anger my mother would give to me and venting it to the people around me, just like she did. This is a very important part of the story because it demonstrates the usual mannerisms kids from single mother childhoods pick up. At this point of my life, I really could have become a degenerate troublemaker, as I caused quite the destructive tantrums. I fortunately did not, but think of the many that did. I can’t count the times I went to the council or principal office in my elementary years. My mother was advised by various instructors and school officials to send me to better schools as I was called a “gifted child.” To them, I was just someone who didn't have the right environment to focus my intelligence. I was getting high grades despite being destructive. Because of my love for visual arts, I was one of the best artists in every grade of my class. I could fill a notebook with imaginative drawings in a week. I use to have a room full of papers with all my cartoons and other doodles. I drew people, animals, you name it. You learn later that I ended up going down a different career, but it is still my hobby.

Realistically, education at more white orientated schools were a lot better than black focused ones. Or I should say, low income schools. My mother did acknowledge my intelligence and tried to always put me in middle-class schools where more white kids went. She would drive us how many miles she needed to have us get a good education from there. I have a feeling this was pushed more by my mother’s mother than herself. This part becomes important, too, because my years before graduating from high school was ups and downs of going to low income and middle-class income schools. I finished 12th grade at a low income school that had enough clout to at least sponsor some top educated kids, who were mostly white of course. White people vs black people dynamic is so interesting. I’ve been pounded from all sides with that narrative my entire life. I think what made me resistant against it is that I was a logical person and very academically focused. I didn’t care for all the unimportant social babble people said around me. I just wanted to study, become successful, get a good family, and not be poor ever again. I hated my mother and I hated the life we lived.

I was an artist, but I was also a self taught computer geek. In senior year, it was time for me to choose what degree I will take before going to college. If I had a time machine, this would be the moment in my life where I would like to go to and make myself do something entirely different. You see, I did some ignorant mistakes. I listened to my school councilor, who told me to go to our nearest major state college and to do it soon. They had a damn good program for what I was pursuing, don’t get me wrong. The reason this was a mistake was because of ignorance. I had no knowledge of what I was about to get to. I was not ready to go to college, neither financially or intelligently. Being in a single mother household, I was incomplete as a man of wisdom. I was still a child and no way would I have survived in college. This goes for most people from low-class families: it just doesn't work.

College ended up being the biggest turning point of my life, and made me come running smack into the wall created by blue pill ideology. If I had a better education at that point, I would have delayed going to college and pursued the growing internet tech industry. I knew how to make websites, program java applets, use C++, you name it. If I just had the right people and business sense, I could have started off the next chapter of my life so much easier than I did. But alas, I went to low-class schools and I grew up in a single mother household.

Go to a dorm. Go to your classes at different times. Manage your own life. Sounds like every kid’s dream, but like all kids, we were idiots. My life took a hellish turn and is the first time I felt big depression. You see, normally in all the public schools I went to, everything is provided to you, so all I have to do is show up and learn. In college, housing, food, and most of all, course materials have to come from you. My family was not wealthy, so I had to take out grants and loans. I was unable to get any scholarships despite being academically praised. So much for those ethnic scholarships they advertised. I got not a single one. This was important because it had me do something I never done before: fail classes. To do homework and course material, you needed to be able to access lessons and read. This was easy back in government funded public school. But in college, I did not have that anymore. Yes, I did get enough money for housing and course materials. And yes I did take out loans, which was also a big mistake, but again, I was not educated enough about money.

What happened to that money? Why could I not afford housing and books like I was supposed to? Think back to earlier when I said what happens when low income houses suddenly get an influx of money. My mother was in charge of my bank account. If you cringed here, you're right to do so. I ended up in debt and failing classes. Because I couldn’t pay for books, I started to become more depressed. I would stay up late into the morning and wake up late. I was skipping classes. The depression would last for the next five years. There was a time after I got out of this where I had a couple of nightmares of me being behind on my workload and getting Fs across the board. Or that I had woke up late and missed my math class again. I was failing exams. Real PTSD shit. The only classes I passed were my computer science classes. I knew most of the material before coming to college from learning on my own. Everything else I failed cause I just didn't have the knowledge from books that I could not buy. And although I was good at math, I couldn't beat calculus with my current state of mind and without the aid of multiple hours of studying from a book.

Eventually, I got academic suspension and school debt. And until I paid that debt off, I was not allowed to continue school or get financial aid. I had descended back into poverty like my mother, let her run my money, had to take a shitty job, and lived homeless due to not being able to pay rent, sleeping off people’s couches. At this part of the story, this is where most people's life ends. I saw many people like myself who had come from similar backgrounds of poverty who let their parents run their lives and they end up poor themselves. It was such a sad thing to see, whether it was in the financial office or in my dorm. I was forced to move back in with my mother after this and for a moment, I was stuck in what one would call a deadbeat life. Cue once again the anger tempers from my mother, the poverty of our household, etc. Just because I lived in a single mother household.

I took up a minimum wage job at a college bookstore and just tried to live. I would still try to read books at the college library I was no longer a student at. And though I was saving money little by little, I still lived with my mom. My money was her money. I would still be doing this were it not for one saving grace: a phone call. In college, I did not waste a lot of my time. I became friends with smart individuals. People that thought like I did. Two of them knew my situation and asked if I could come live with them as a roommate. They acknowledged how skillful I was, and wanted to help me get back into college. They also knew I was unhappy in my current predicament. So I saved up money to prepare for my move. And when I had enough, I went right back to my college town. There, I would work and start saving money to pay back my school’s debt.

As I said, I never got a college degree and yet I ended up getting into a very good job. This happened for a few reasons. One, I took up web development as a side job. Two, I eventually started a small tech company with one of my friends who saw my skills. And three, after gaining skills and a network, I had enough credentials to get myself a near six digit salary. This all could have been easily done if I had just the right upbringing and circumstances, but sometimes you just have to go through the hard way to reach what you should be at. What annoys me to this day is that it took me ten years longer to get to where I should have been had I graduated college properly. Instead, I was set back by many years on my career simply due to the drudge that is living in a single mother household.

I hated my mother and throughout this time, I have done everything to minimize every possible contact with her down to not even talking to her occasionally. People would ask me why I don’t speak with my mom and I remain silent. Truth is I don’t want to speak to her. She has ruined a large part of my life and if I let her back in again as the “lovable son”, my life will instantly go back to a depression pot of poverty and despair. And yet I still keep our contact and she contacts me once in a while. Often asking for money. And recently, a large sum of money that I needed to convince her that I would not give. I did my best to hide the fact I was making a lot of money because if she found out, she would be reaching for the hills again. It seems she never will change. I do not hate her in the real sense any longer. Being a man means holding no anger to anyone and to focus only on your life and emotions. And today, I survived every single guilt trip she could send at me. I could feel the tiny remnant tug on my soul of the chains she held on me throughout my life. But as I sit here and sigh, I feel relieved. That I can sit here, say no, and forget her. I will mourn her the day she dies, but all of my experience and instincts told me to not submit to her. My life is not worth her momentary bad decisions.

And yet, millions of other people are in this situation where they are tied down by welfare, their mothers, and debt in general. They are depressed, have nowhere to go, no way out, and are drowning themselves in vices to give them a momentary relapse from their slavery. Crime escalates. Degeneracy goes out of control. Government power rises to fix the problems the government started in the first place. A spiral of depression that leads to fall out of cities, societies, and economy. And all because one boy or girl were born in a single mother household. Nay, at this point, I would replace the term single mother household with government household. And just like government funded roads, a government funded family is just as shitty.

Welfare is slavery. Single mothers are parasites. Colleges are traps for anyone but those with high IQs and lots of money (I wasn't any of them). Debt sucks. Education is important, but it doesn't have to be from a public school.

This country needs more guys like you. Seriously.
09-02-2019 08:22 PM
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Samseau Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Saved From A Single Mother Household
Great post, great story, amazing you made it out and found this place.

Absolutely, single motherhood is a tremendous scourge that must be avoided at all costs, yet is promoted by the man. For every good single-mother, there are 5 bad ones. The kids who grow up with irresponsible mothers who needed a man to provide structure suffer tremendously.

You should consider yourself blessed by God to have made it out in one piece. As for your mother, you should try to forgive her; she doesn't know what she's doing. At some point, if you want to do the right thing, you'll have to take charge of her life. Put her in a cheap room, pay for her stuff and nothing more, and essentially be the husband she never had.

What's really sickening is how White America turns a blind eye to this evil, instead patting themselves on the back for thinking they are "taking care" of these poor Blacks. In reality, it destroys their family structure and degenerates Blacks. Feminism plus race guilt is a toxic mix that has caused perhaps as much harm to Blacks as slavery once did, which is incredible when one really thinks about it.

Contributor at Return of Kings. You can follow me on Gab.

Be sure to check out the easiest mining program around, FreedomXMR.
09-02-2019 11:02 PM
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Manbeline Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Saved From A Single Mother Household
(09-02-2019 11:02 PM)Samseau Wrote:  Great post, great story, amazing you made it out and found this place.

Absolutely, single motherhood is a tremendous scourge that must be avoided at all costs, yet is promoted by the man. For every good single-mother, there are 5 bad ones. The kids who grow up with irresponsible mothers who needed a man to provide structure suffer tremendously.

You should consider yourself blessed by God to have made it out in one piece. As for your mother, you should try to forgive her; she doesn't know what she's doing. At some point, if you want to do the right thing, you'll have to take charge of her life. Put her in a cheap room, pay for her stuff and nothing more, and essentially be the husband she never had.

What's really sickening is how White America turns a blind eye to this evil, instead patting themselves on the back for thinking they are "taking care" of these poor Blacks. In reality, it destroys their family structure and degenerates Blacks. Feminism plus race guilt is a toxic mix that has caused perhaps as much harm to Blacks as slavery once did, which is incredible when one really thinks about it.
I learned a while ago that my mother was using me as if I was the man in her life, and realized that is essentially what a lot of single mothers do to their own sons. Daughters tend to be more like the mother sister in that scenario, which is still just as emotionally and financially draining. I do not want to be the husband she never had. That should not be my role and I do not feel like using resources just to give her that living. I know eventually I may have to, but she has other children. I am not yet ready to forgive her to the point I become a benefactor again.

On the white America comment, this one hits very close to home. A lot of blacks hate white guilt. It's insulting and pandering. Ironically, a lot of the welfare benefactors do not ascertain that welfare is a result of such guilt. It is disconnected as far as they are concerned, mostly because they are not educated enough. I hated food stamps back when I was a kid. It made us feel like we were on an allowance from the government. Meanwhile, I saw wealthier kids with better food and luxuries that made me envious of their lifestyles and how I can unlock it. Teach how to fish, not give a fish mentality would have been very good for my mother if she learned it. I agree here that this is part of her that I cannot change and she will never change in. Same for any poor person, black, white, it doesn't matter.

I would be all for the welfare state being removed tomorrow. Just get rid of it all. We survived without it before and we will survive after it.
09-03-2019 05:07 PM
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