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Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
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Roosh Offline
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Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
I don't care for made-up diseases, but people do seem to be becoming neurotic about food.

Quote:Whether it's gluten-free, dairy-free, raw food, or all-organic, many people these days are committed to so-called "clean eating" — the idea that choosing only whole foods in their natural state and avoiding processed ones can improve health.

It's not necessarily a bad thing to eat this way, but sometimes these kinds of food preferences can begin to take over people's lives, making them fear social events where they won't be able to find the "right" foods. When a healthful eating pattern goes too far, it may turn into an eating disorder that scientists are just beginning to study.

Alex Everakes, 25, is a public relations account executive from Chicago. As a kid, he struggled with being overweight. In his teens and 20s, he tried to diet, and he gained and lost and regained about 100 pounds.

When he moved to Los Angeles after college, he took his diet to a new level. He started working out twice a day. At one point, he ate just 10 foods — "Spinach, chicken, egg whites, red peppers — because green peppers make you bloated — spaghetti squash, asparagus, salmon, berries, unsweetened almond milk, almond butter," Everakes says.

He went from 250 pounds at his heaviest, down to 140. He posted pictures of his six-pack abs and his "clean" diet online and was praised for it. He felt virtuous, but at the same time, he was starving, tired and lonely.

"My life literally was modeled to put myself away from destruction of my fitness," Everakes says.

He became afraid to eat certain foods. He worked at home to avoid office parties where he'd have to eat in front of others. He didn't go out or make friends because he didn't want to have to explain his diet.

It turns out Everakes was struggling with something called orthorexia nervosa.

Orthorexia is a fairly recent phenomenon. Dr. Steven Bratman, an alternative medicine practitioner in the 1990s, first coined the term in an essay in the nonscientific Yoga Journal in 1997. Many of his patients eschewed traditional medicine and believed that the key to good health was simply eating the "right" foods. Some of them would ask him what foods they should cut out.

Whether it's gluten or dairy, many people avoid certain types of foods. Sometimes food avoidance can turn into fear, obsession and even veer into an eating disorder that scientists are just beginning to study.

"People would think they should cut out all dairy and they should cut out all lentils, all wheat ... And it dawned on me gradually that many of these patients, their primary problem was that they were ... far too strict with themselves," he says.

So Bratman made up the name orthorexia, borrowing ortho from the Greek word meaning "right" and -orexia meaning "appetite." He added nervosa as a reference to anorexia nervosa, the well-known eating disorder which causes people to starve themselves to be thin.

"From then on, whenever a patient would ask me what food to cut out, I would say, 'We need to work on your orthorexia.' This would often make them laugh and let them loosen up, and sometimes it helped people move from extremism to moderation," he recalls.

Bratman had no idea that the concept of "clean eating" would explode over the next two decades.

Where dieters once gobbled down no-sugar gelatin or fat-free shakes, now they might seek out organic kale and wild salmon.

Sondra Kronberg, founder and executive director of the Eating Disorder Treatment Collaborative outside New York City, has seen a lot of diet trends over the past 40 years.

"So orthorexia is a reflection on a larger scale of the cultural perspective on 'eating cleanly,' eating ... healthfully, avoiding toxins — including foods that might have some 'super power,' " she says.

Now, Kronberg and other nutritionists applaud efforts to eat healthfully. The problem comes, she says, when you are so focused on your diet that "it begins to infringe on the quality of your life — your ability to be spontaneous and engage." That's when you should start to worry about an eating disorder, she says.

"In the case of orthorexia, it centers around eating 'cleanly' and purely, where the other eating disorders center around size and weight and a drive for thinness," she says.

Sometimes these problems overlap, and some people who only eat "clean" foods miss critical nutrients from the foods they cut out or don't consume enough calories. "It could become a health hazard and ultimately, it can be fatal," Kronberg says.

Dr. S.E. Specter, a psychiatrist and nutrition scientist based in Beverly Hills who specializes in eating disorders, notes that there are only 145 published scientific articles on orthorexia. "For anorexia nervosa, there are 16,064 published studies and for eating disorders in general, there are 41,258. So [orthorexia] doesn't stack up in terms of the knowledge base so far," he says.

A 2018 review of orthorexia studies published in the journal Eating and Weight Disorders finds no common definition, standard diagnostic criteria, or reliable ways to measure orthorexia's psychological impact.

Orthorexia is not listed specifically in the DSM — the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders — but that doesn't mean it's untreatable.

"I just think orthorexia is maybe a little bit too hard to pin down, or it's looked at as a piece of the other related disorders — the eating disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and general anxiety disorder as well," Specter says.

To treat it, "we have to look at the thought process and try to disentangle the beliefs that a person has. They become very entrenched," he says.

"It's a very kind of gradual process for ... many in terms of trying to back out of a need to always check to see that, you know, locks are locked or that a food is not going to be harmful to them — cause their skin to break out or increase their risk of cancer," he says.

Alex Everakes has been in treatment for two years. While he's still significantly underweight, he says he's happier and learning to see his diet a little differently.

For Everakes, taking control of his orthorexia is "knowing that your world isn't going to come crashing down if you have like, a piece of pizza."

He's managed this by taking baby steps. Instead of going right for a slice of standard pizza, he started with cauliflower crust pizza. He ordered frozen yogurt before going for full-fat ice cream.

Eating disorders can strike anyone. Roughly 1 in 3 people struggling with eating disorders is male, according to the National Eating Disorders Association. And these disorders affect athletes at a higher rate than the rest of the population.

If you think you have orthorexia or any eating disorder, it's important to seek professional help and friends who support you, Everakes says.

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/201...-obsession

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10-15-2019 06:15 PM
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TheFinalEpic Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
To be honest, I would rather more people question everything they eat and be health conscious than eat all the processed garbage that has made 50+% of the western world morbidly obese.

Where people go wrong is the nuance. It's pretty simple - Eat what your ancestors ate that made them strong and intelligent; able to create the civilization we live in today. Don't eat stuff with a mile long ingredient list, eat stuff that is in it's natural state, and don't drink calories.

There, we solved the obesity epidemic.

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10-15-2019 07:08 PM
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RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
""
He became afraid to eat certain foods. He worked at home to avoid office parties where he'd have to eat in front of others. He didn't go out or make friends because he didn't want to have to explain his diet.
""

This is happening to me.
10-16-2019 05:58 PM
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Tail Gunner Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
What did Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, say about food:

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” ― Hippocrates


Food is literally one of the most important things in your life. It can literally have the impact of medicine and contribute to a long healthy life -- or a shorter, more miserable one.

Eating right literally made me a new man and allowed me to reclaim my health.

Having said that, you can take almost anything too far. You can even kill yourself by drinking too much water.
(This post was last modified: 10-16-2019 11:01 PM by Tail Gunner.)
10-16-2019 11:00 PM
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Brazilianguy
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Post: #5
RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
I've actually thought about this a lot.

If you consider all the research on the placebo effect, and the negative or positive effect your attitude can play in sickness, often meaning the difference between getting better or dying, it just makes sense to me that getting over-paranoid about food or convincing yourself the food you eat is poison could have some unfortunate unintended consequences.

I try to limit my carbs and stay "in the range" of a high fat, high protein diet. Limit my sugar, do IF a lot, and sometimes my diet goes full carnivore a while.

But there's nothing I won't ever eat and I try not to get too hyped up on foods being "unclean" or destructive.

If I'm at a social gathering or out at dinner I just enjoy what's on offer, within reason, and sometimes I just eat things because life is short and I enjoy them. Skipping a few meals after a big holiday or party can be a good idea.

I do go through some intense periods to get my body back on track but I'll just tell people straight up what I'm doing instead of feeling so nervous about it I won't go out with them. lol C'mon, what are they going to do - make fun of you? Oh no... Some people are just way too sensitive about a little good-natured teasing and pushback from friends.

Anyhow, I think there's merit to the thought of "clean eating" but I think worrying about it all the time will do a lot more damage than the food will. The human body is pretty resilient and adaptable. I also believe fasting from time to time is a great countermeasure to things like cancer that might be caused by harmful foods or a harmful environment - if not, believing it is may be all the help you need.

The power of belief is a fascinating thing. It can also be a double edged sword so sometimes you have to pick and choose what you'll allow yourself to believe in. There are limits to the ability of willful blindness to protect you, of course, but I think it's something worth considering for sure.

"The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe.
To be your own man is a hard business. If you try it, you'll be lonely often, and sometimes
frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself." - Kipling
(This post was last modified: 10-17-2019 02:03 AM by Beyond Borders.)
10-17-2019 01:58 AM
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Simeon_Strangelight Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
In the 1990s they did a TV report on Orthorexia. Virtually all of them were vegans or raw vegans.

I have yet to see some orthorexic guy who got sick on a diet of raw organic milk, raw eggs and daily steak.





And for those who haven't tried it - raw organic milk with raw egg like Rocky I is one hell of a meal. It has to be raw milk, because pasteurization destroys the enzimes that you need to digest milk well - also destroys many other nutrients.

Either way - in most cases orthorexic might as well be called vegans.

And here a bunch of public "thought leader" vegans:





Dr. Natasha Campbell treats people with food disorders. The difficulty in the beginning is that malnourishment has warped their mental perception, so they usualyl require strict control of the family to help feed them, then later after their mind has returned, then they can be reasoned with.

Look again at the documentary above - virtually all of the strongly malnourished people were vegans.

Oh - and if you eat organic chicken with organic rice and steak, then you can become even a pro-bodybuilder on that - add organic whey protein powder and you will look like a beat with enough training.
(This post was last modified: 10-17-2019 04:52 AM by Simeon_Strangelight.)
10-17-2019 04:40 AM
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d'Aversa Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
Quote:"Orthorexia is a fairly recent phenomenon. Dr. Steven Bratman, an alternative medicine practitioner in the 1990s, first coined the term in an essay in the nonscientific Yoga Journal in 1997. Many of his patients eschewed traditional medicine and believed that the key to good health was simply eating the "right" foods. Some of them would ask him what foods they should cut out.

Whether it's gluten or dairy, many people avoid certain types of foods. Sometimes food avoidance can turn into fear, obsession and even veer into an eating disorder that scientists are just beginning to study."

I'd say globalists are freaking out that there are people who dislike mcdonalds and other crap processed food, so they make a healthy concern about nutrition a mental illness. The more people wanting to eat healthy, the less people to be coerced into eating bugs.
(This post was last modified: 10-17-2019 07:11 AM by d'Aversa.)
10-17-2019 07:10 AM
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RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
Quote: Sometimes these problems overlap, and some people who only eat "clean" foods miss critical nutrients from the foods they cut out or don't consume enough calories. "It could become a health hazard and ultimately, it can be fatal," Kronberg says.

Remember, kids.

Orthorexia kills.

Get on the vegan doughnuts...

Orthorexia Kills.
10-17-2019 07:20 AM
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Simeon_Strangelight Offline
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RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
Yeah - vegans who take in 4000 calories and whose cronomater account looks super-clean still don't consume essential nutrients because plants either don't have them or they are not conducive for our digestion.

Cows have 4 stomachs and gorillas eat 36-40 pounds per day and spend the majority of their days chewing - also being able to digest that shit.

Good luck on changing a diet that humans and humanoids had for hundreds of thousands of years.
10-17-2019 07:25 AM
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Al O'Peesha Offline
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RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
Exactly - but this doesn't seem to resonate with an alarming number of people.

Still, it gives fatties and militant vegans the opportunity to feel good about themselves. "Hey bud, you eat healthy? You may not be diabetic or morbidly obese but you're just as much a victim as me!"

Orthorexia Kills.
10-17-2019 07:33 AM
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Tail Gunner Offline
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RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
How did this thread turn into the anti-vegan thread? From the original article, where I saw nothing at all related to veganism:

Quote:Where dieters once gobbled down no-sugar gelatin or fat-free shakes, now they might seek out organic kale and wild salmon.

Someone eating kale and wild salmon and related foods (e.g., spinach and grass fed beef) will eat quite healthy. I suspect that all this blather is just some PR by the fast food industry trying to keep the herd from straying.

I read somewhere that if a mere 15% of shoppers insist on buying organic produce, the slim profit margins for sellers of non-organic produce would force the entire produce industry to switch to organic. Germany's largest supermarket chain recently switched to selling only organic produce. So, the writing is on the wall. I expect more toxic industries to become desperate, manipulative, and deceitful as they struggle to retain economic viability.
(This post was last modified: 10-17-2019 10:49 AM by Tail Gunner.)
10-17-2019 10:44 AM
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Simeon_Strangelight Offline
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RE: Orthorexia: When clean eating becomes an obsession
(10-17-2019 10:44 AM)Tail Gunner Wrote:  How did this thread turn into the anti-vegan thread? From the original article, where I saw nothing at all related to veganism:

Quote:Where dieters once gobbled down no-sugar gelatin or fat-free shakes, now they might seek out organic kale and wild salmon.

Someone eating kale and wild salmon and related foods (e.g., spinach and grass fed beef) will eat quite healthy. I suspect that all this blather is just some PR by the fast food industry trying to keep the herd from straying.

Simple - if you look into the first video I posted of a John Stossel report on Orthorexia you find out that almost all of the severe dangerous malnourished cases of orthorexia targets were vegans or raw vegans. Heck - that one guy there is famous in countless memes decades later - that's the stick-armed guy selecting fruit and vegetables in the supermarket.

Thus the main gist is that orthorexia is essentially only dangerous when paired with vegan or sometimes vegetarian diet. Anyone else will at worst be overspending on organic eggs and meat or game, but that person will be fine - more comparable to primal keto diet and human tribes have been surviving like that for millennia.

The media however is deliberately plant-based pushing as well as vegan pushing, since most of those foods can be done with a few machines and tons of pesticides. But the opposite is true about mass animal husbandry - it's difficult to do in an easy way - small and medium farmers have the advantage here.

Thus when they talk about orthorexia they instantly tell you to avoid seeing the guy with a vegan shirt or not notice that almost all of the malnourished orthorexic people were vegans.

And mistrusting the food industry labels is common sense - they probably came up with that label to discourage people from reading the labels too closely as well. I agree with that, however - the vegan part only makes that crap dangerous. The woman who catalogued everything in excel sheets was fine - for her it was at best a stupid habit as she wrote down how much turkey and chicken she ate. But you note that she was actually fine health wise - just that it became an obsessive habit.

The other guys and women ... not so much.
(This post was last modified: 10-17-2019 10:58 AM by Simeon_Strangelight.)
10-17-2019 10:56 AM
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