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Teaching English Abroad
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Post: #101
RE: teaching english abroad
(03-10-2012 11:58 AM)memcpy Wrote:  I just got here tonight it was like an 20hour plane ride, so i'm still jet-lagged, can't sleep still. It was a breeze going through customs. At Narita I saw lots of cute girls. My first impressions, I saw lots of people wearing business suits and dressed kinda a stylish, didn't see any flip-flops but it's cold here now. Everyone's really polite, i'm not used to it. Oh yea, and they will stare at you, but it didn't bother me. I'm not white looking at all. I'll be testing the suit game out here for sure, can't wait.

Wait to you hit shibuya... even when its freezing those girls are showing leg and chest.

I can't wait to go back to Japan.
03-11-2012 01:27 PM
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Post: #102
RE: teaching english abroad
(03-11-2012 09:36 AM)redneckpunk Wrote:  I think Jdreise's breakdown of expat teachers applies to most countries. Depending how much of a party country it is perceived to be will skew the scumbag ratio, much more in Thailand or South America vs Korea or China.

Jdreise- where are the western friendly Korean girls to be found in Seoul? I might have a project there in the future.

Haha scumbag ratio. I like that. Thailand is up there in the ratio. I've heard it's gotten better here over the years as they've taken to cracking down on people who come here with exploitation in mind. Supposedly all the heavyweight scumbags have moved on to Cambodia.

I lived in a suburb on the edge of Busan so I spent most of my time in that area and only went up to Seoul six times. Itaewon is the area of Seoul that's famous for being very Western, with Kebab stands, Mexican food, burger joints and tons of bars. It's also full of US Marines acting like idiots if you're there before their curfew. After curfew, you see military police out looking for stragglers. If you meet Korean girls in that district, they are for sure open to foreigners if not just downright looking for action. I got picked-up there. That was only time in Korea where a chick did all the work.

If you want to avoid being associated with Marines (good idea) then you can go to a district called "Hongdae," which is off-limits to US military personnel. It gets its name because it's next to Hongik University (HONGik DAEhaggyo in Korean). It's full of bars and clubs and lots of hot girls. Most of them can speak some English but if you learn just a few words in Korean that'll help.

Like I said, I didn't live in Seoul but if you're planning on visiting Busan, I could give you a lot better info on good venues and districts.

How long are you going to be there and what will you be doing?

If not teaching, you might want to let that be known within the first few minutes of talking to a girl. It will set you apart from 95% of all the other foreigners that are likely to talk to her (excluding military but they get bottom quality anyway).
03-11-2012 10:54 PM
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Post: #103
RE: teaching english abroad
(03-11-2012 07:36 AM)Aliblahba Wrote:  I noticed a lot of the teachers get a degree, and then one of the certs. How about one of us that have a solid technical background, and some college? As for teaching adults, wouldn't it make sense for someone that understands heavier subjects like schematics, or hydraulics?

Do you have an associate degree? If I'm not mistaken, I believe I was reading it's possible to teach in China with an associates and TEFL. I'm sure there's a huge demand there for someone with knowledge of technical English. Maybe you could find work giving classes to engineers.

Otherwise, it seems like most countries won't give you a visa unless you have at least a Bachelor's. Maybe since you've been working in oil you could find some way to parlay that into getting some kind of expert consultant visa.
03-11-2012 11:02 PM
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Post: #104
RE: teaching english abroad
Once again, huge kudos jdreise for your very detailed reply on comparing teaching in Korea vs Thailand. Did you notice any of the infmaous racism if not hostility, that you hear/read a lot online about Korean people in general, specially when being seen with their girls?
Thanks again for all your awesome golden nuggets you've been dropping here!
03-12-2012 04:34 PM
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Post: #105
RE: teaching english abroad
(03-12-2012 04:34 PM)Vacancier Permanent Wrote:  Once again, huge kudos jdreise for your very detailed reply on comparing teaching in Korea vs Thailand. Did you notice any of the infmaous racism if not hostility, that you hear/read a lot online about Korean people in general, specially when being seen with their girls?
Thanks again for all your awesome golden nuggets you've been dropping here!

You're welcome!

Racism... man, I've got some stories for you. I speak some Korean, which most foreigners there never attempt to learn. Koreans look at foreigners and think that there's no way in hell you could possibly understand what they're saying, so they'll make racist and derogatory comments right in front of you with a smile on their face. I was called "dog," "big-nose," "monkey," "dirty," "stupid," "horse face," "chicken head"... the list goes on. I'd always let them know that I understood their insults. I didn't care if it made the situation awkward. Fuck them for being ignorant assholes.

Sticks and stones may break my bones... Yeah, words are just words and while they may sting, it's the actions that take place that should be more cause for alarm.

I'm about 6'1 205 and in excellent shape. Unless you're a MMA fighter guy with anger issues or some guy with serious little man syndrome you probably wouldn't try to start a fight with me. It doesn't matter about your size, I wouldn't fight with you either because I don't see any reason to start problems. You'd think with Koreans being a much smaller and weaker group, they'd be less inclined to start shit. Not so. I'll get there in a minute...

Yeah, they're a racist and closed-minded society. Up until Japanese colonization Korea was known as the "Hermit Kingdom." It was closed to outsiders. Part of its isolation was due to plain geography. It's a very mountainous peninsula, surrounded by sea on three sides (durrrr... peninsula) and mountains and boreal forest to the north. The other cause/reason for their isolation may be that it was a way to maintain their culture and state against the comparatively massive imperial forces in China and Japan. Even though they've opened their borders and become a global industrial power, you can't erase thousands of years of a tribal culture that was always strongly opposed to outside influence, with 30 years of making cell phones and crappy cars. They have a tribal mentality coupled with a victim complex after 80 years of imperial Japanese rule and now American military presence.

So yeah, it's a place that's a breeding ground for xenophobia, racism, and ignorance of the outside world. Most Koreans never leave their little peninsula.

Also, you have to understand that most Korean boys practice taekwondo growing up. They can fight. Military service is also obligatory for all Korean men. Also, after having been to both countries, I'd say Koreans drink about as much as Ukrainians, which is to say, "in excess." Haven't been to Russia so I can't compare it but if you walk around a bar or restaurant area on any night of the week at about 11 or 12 you'll see people passed out on the sidewalk, in the gutter, on benches. They're a bunch of alcoholics.

So you have an ethnically homogeneous population of xenophobic (I'd wouldn't say racist), militaristic drunks that can all throw down if they want to. It sometimes causes problems.

One time I had just finished eating dinner with my then-girlfriend and was saying goodbye to her in the hallway of a shopping mall-like building so that I could go meet some buddies and play pool. All of the sudden someone came up alongside me and sucker punched me in the side of the head. I stumbled and crashed into the wall next to an elevator then realize that blood was pouring down the side of my face. If this had happened in the States my first inclination would have been to charge and beat whoever did it senseless but the first thought that popped into my head was, "You're in Korea. Don't fight"

A couple weeks prior one of my buddies was eating dinner at an outdoor restaurant on a popular walking street. Out of nowhere some guy came up behind him and pulled his chair out from under him causing my buddy to fall on the ground. He stood up and there was a small confrontation that resulted in my friend slapping this Korean guy. One slap. Not a punch that drew blood or caused a bruise. Just a slap. The police were called in and it was determined that since my friend "won" the "fight" he had to pay the other guy for "insulting his honor." If he refused to pay, he'd be arrested, have his bank account drained and confiscated by the state, and be deported from the country the next day. He ended up having to pay the equivalent of about $2000 US to this guy for a slap.

I've heard other stories where foreigners have done serious physical damage to Koreans, had to pay out big, ended up in jail, and then been deported. The law is against you there and there are Koreans that know it and will provoke you in order to get some easy cash. Getting your face rearranged by a foreigner means 3 months salary and an all-expense-paid two week-long vacation at the local hospital.

So back to my story... Before even looking up to see who was attacking me I realized that I couldn't hit him. As I came to I looked up and saw a short Korean guy of about 50, dressed in a Hyundai factory uniform, obviously drunk, and yelling obscenities at me. A split second later he was yelling at my gf, calling here a slut and traitor, and shaking his fist her.

At that point, I stopped thinking about not killing him and focused more on protecting my girlfriend. I rushed him, tackled him hard, and then held him down until some other witnesses came over and were able to help subdue him. We had to wait about 10 minutes until the police showed up and during that time the cut over my eye continued to bleed. Some the blood got onto dude's Hyundai uniform.

As we sat there I was pissed off about my eye but started thinking "Fuck yeah! Payback! I'm going to get some money from this fucker and teach these bastards that you can't just abuse foreigners and get away with it." When the cops showed up, I tried to launch into negotiations about what I was owed but they acted like they couldn't understand anything I was saying. Bullshit. My girlfriend started the negotiation while I frantically tried to get the info of other bystanders and witnesses in case I need to prove my story. They told her they had to arrest the guy and that I should try and get a lawyer if I wanted to get something out of him. I was enraged. How can they extort the foreigner when the Korean gets hurt but when the tables are turned the same rules don't apply?

They handcuffed the guy, put him in the car, took a quick report and my info, and then left. I went to the ER with my gf and got some stitches to fix up my eye. There's still a bit of a scar there.

The next day I got a call at work saying that I should come down to the station to answer some questions. The same police officer who didn't speak English and couldn't understand my Korean the night before miraculously had learned conversational English in less than 14 hours! He told me that the Korean was injured from me tackling him and was worried that he might have contracted HIV from being in contact with my blood. LOL!!!! I guess the guy had spent the night in the hospital and had taken the day off from work. I might have to pay for his hospital stay and lost wages. WTF?!?

They said I should go have an HIV test and come back with the results ASAP. I immediately started calling every Korean friend or colleague I had telling them what was happening. They started flooding the police station with calls asking what was happening and demanding that the other guy be held responsible. I figured at that point I should probably follow their advice and go get the HIV test so that I wouldn't give this shithead any more reason to stay in the hospital

While I was in the hospital waiting room. I got a phone call from the cop. He said, "Don't come back station. Now case finished. Sorry." The next day I found out that one of my colleagues got a hold of the director of schools in my city. The director called the police and threatened to call their higher-ups and the newspaper if they didn't drop the case. So they did. That was that. I got a nice scar above my eye and shithead got to assault a foreigner and get away with it.

I have other stories too, like the time one of my friends was riding a motorcycle through an intersection and got hit by a van that ran a red light. It was the middle of the night and there were no other witnesses. As my buddy (who can speak Korean) was laying there bleeding with a dislocated shoulder he heard the Korean guy get out of the car and say to his wife, "Don't worry, it's just a white guy." They called their friends and had them come down to tell the police that it was my friend that ran the red light. He spent two weeks in the hospital, had to have his shoulder reconstructed, had to pay for all the damages to the van, and his motorcycle was totaled. Since he was "in the wrong" the judge decided that his Korean wife and her mother had to go to the drivers house beg for forgiveness and offer a monetary gift.

So yeah, there's palpable racism in Korea both in the legal system and the way that people treat you. However, most people are very kind and genuinely want you to think well of their country. You didn't ask about that aspect of life there though, so I didn't go into. Those are two incidents that marred my time there but I still believe they are far overshadowed by the everyday kindness that I experienced from most people there.

Korean girls are hot too. Just sayin'
(This post was last modified: 03-13-2012 02:46 AM by jdreise.)
03-13-2012 02:11 AM
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Post: #106
RE: teaching english abroad
I never had much interest in Korea and now I have even less reasons to want to visit let alone work there.
03-13-2012 03:21 AM
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americanInEurope Offline
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Post: #107
RE: teaching english abroad
(03-13-2012 02:11 AM)jdreise Wrote:  
(03-12-2012 04:34 PM)Vacancier Permanent Wrote:  Once again, huge kudos jdreise for your very detailed reply on comparing teaching in Korea vs Thailand. Did you notice any of the infmaous racism if not hostility, that you hear/read a lot online about Korean people in general, specially when being seen with their girls?
Thanks again for all your awesome golden nuggets you've been dropping here!

You're welcome!

Racism... man, I've got some stories for you. I speak some Korean, which most foreigners there never attempt to learn. Koreans look at foreigners and think that there's no way in hell you could possibly understand what they're saying, so they'll make racist and derogatory comments right in front of you with a smile on their face. I was called "dog," "big-nose," "monkey," "dirty," "stupid," "horse face," "chicken head"... the list goes on. I'd always let them know that I understood their insults. I didn't care if it made the situation awkward. Fuck them for being ignorant assholes.

Sticks and stones may break my bones... Yeah, words are just words and while they may sting, it's the actions that take place that should be more cause for alarm.

I'm about 6'1 205 and in excellent shape. Unless you're a MMA fighter guy with anger issues or some guy with serious little man syndrome you probably wouldn't try to start a fight with me. It doesn't matter about your size, I wouldn't fight with you either because I don't see any reason to start problems. You'd think with Koreans being a much smaller and weaker group, they'd be less inclined to start shit. Not so. I'll get there in a minute...

Yeah, they're a racist and closed-minded society. Up until Japanese colonization Korea was known as the "Hermit Kingdom." It was closed to outsiders. Part of its isolation was due to plain geography. It's a very mountainous peninsula, surrounded by sea on three sides (durrrr... peninsula) and mountains and boreal forest to the north. The other cause/reason for their isolation may be that it was a way to maintain their culture and state against the comparatively massive imperial forces in China and Japan. Even though they've opened their borders and become a global industrial power, you can't erase thousands of years of a tribal culture that was always strongly opposed to outside influence, with 30 years of making cell phones and crappy cars. They have a tribal mentality coupled with a victim complex after 80 years of imperial Japanese rule and now American military presence.

So yeah, it's a place that's a breeding ground for xenophobia, racism, and ignorance of the outside world. Most Koreans never leave their little peninsula.

Also, you have to understand that most Korean boys practice taekwondo growing up. They can fight. Military service is also obligatory for all Korean men. Also, after having been to both countries, I'd say Koreans drink about as much as Ukrainians, which is to say, "in excess." Haven't been to Russia so I can't compare it but if you walk around a bar or restaurant area on any night of the week at about 11 or 12 you'll see people passed out on the sidewalk, in the gutter, on benches. They're a bunch of alcoholics.

So you have an ethnically homogeneous population of xenophobic (I'd wouldn't say racist), militaristic drunks that can all throw down if they want to. It sometimes causes problems.

One time I had just finished eating dinner with my then-girlfriend and was saying goodbye to her in the hallway of a shopping mall-like building so that I could go meet some buddies and play pool. All of the sudden someone came up alongside me and sucker punched me in the side of the head. I stumbled and crashed into the wall next to an elevator then realize that blood was pouring down the side of my face. If this had happened in the States my first inclination would have been to charge and beat whoever did it senseless but the first thought that popped into my head was, "You're in Korea. Don't fight"

A couple weeks prior one of my buddies was eating dinner at an outdoor restaurant on a popular walking street. Out of nowhere some guy came up behind him and pulled his chair out from under him causing my buddy to fall on the ground. He stood up and there was a small confrontation that resulted in my friend slapping this Korean guy. One slap. Not a punch that drew blood or caused a bruise. Just a slap. The police were called in and it was determined that since my friend "won" the "fight" he had to pay the other guy for "insulting his honor." If he refused to pay, he'd be arrested, have his bank account drained and confiscated by the state, and be deported from the country the next day. He ended up having to pay the equivalent of about $2000 US to this guy for a slap.

I've heard other stories where foreigners have done serious physical damage to Koreans, had to pay out big, ended up in jail, and then been deported. The law is against you there and there are Koreans that know it and will provoke you in order to get some easy cash. Getting your face rearranged by a foreigner means 3 months salary and an all-expense-paid two week-long vacation at the local hospital.

So back to my story... Before even looking up to see who was attacking me I realized that I couldn't hit him. As I came to I looked up and saw a short Korean guy of about 50, dressed in a Hyundai factory uniform, obviously drunk, and yelling obscenities at me. A split second later he was yelling at my gf, calling here a slut and traitor, and shaking his fist her.

At that point, I stopped thinking about not killing him and focused more on protecting my girlfriend. I rushed him, tackled him hard, and then held him down until some other witnesses came over and were able to help subdue him. We had to wait about 10 minutes until the police showed up and during that time the cut over my eye continued to bleed. Some the blood got onto dude's Hyundai uniform.

As we sat there I was pissed off about my eye but started thinking "Fuck yeah! Payback! I'm going to get some money from this fucker and teach these bastards that you can't just abuse foreigners and get away with it." When the cops showed up, I tried to launch into negotiations about what I was owed but they acted like they couldn't understand anything I was saying. Bullshit. My girlfriend started the negotiation while I frantically tried to get the info of other bystanders and witnesses in case I need to prove my story. They told her they had to arrest the guy and that I should try and get a lawyer if I wanted to get something out of him. I was enraged. How can they extort the foreigner when the Korean gets hurt but when the tables are turned the same rules don't apply?

They handcuffed the guy, put him in the car, took a quick report and my info, and then left. I went to the ER with my gf and got some stitches to fix up my eye. There's still a bit of a scar there.

The next day I got a call at work saying that I should come down to the station to answer some questions. The same police officer who didn't speak English and couldn't understand my Korean the night before miraculously had learned conversational English in less than 14 hours! He told me that the Korean was injured from me tackling him and was worried that he might have contracted HIV from being in contact with my blood. LOL!!!! I guess the guy had spent the night in the hospital and had taken the day off from work. I might have to pay for his hospital stay and lost wages. WTF?!?

They said I should go have an HIV test and come back with the results ASAP. I immediately started calling every Korean friend or colleague I had telling them what was happening. They started flooding the police station with calls asking what was happening and demanding that the other guy be held responsible. I figured at that point I should probably follow their advice and go get the HIV test so that I wouldn't give this shithead any more reason to stay in the hospital

While I was in the hospital waiting room. I got a phone call from the cop. He said, "Don't come back station. Now case finished. Sorry." The next day I found out that one of my colleagues got a hold of the director of schools in my city. The director called the police and threatened to call their higher-ups and the newspaper if they didn't drop the case. So they did. That was that. I got a nice scar above my eye and shithead got to assault a foreigner and get away with it.

I have other stories too, like the time one of my friends was riding a motorcycle through an intersection and got hit by a van that ran a red light. It was the middle of the night and there were no other witnesses. As my buddy (who can speak Korean) was laying there bleeding with a dislocated shoulder he heard the Korean guy get out of the car and say to his wife, "Don't worry, it's just a white guy." They called their friends and had them come down to tell the police that it was my friend that ran the red light. He spent two weeks in the hospital, had to have his shoulder reconstructed, had to pay for all the damages to the van, and his motorcycle was totaled. Since he was "in the wrong" the judge decided that his Korean wife and her mother had to go to the drivers house beg for forgiveness and offer a monetary gift.

So yeah, there's palpable racism in Korea both in the legal system and the way that people treat you. However, most people are very kind and genuinely want you to think well of their country. You didn't ask about that aspect of life there though, so I didn't go into. Those are two incidents that marred my time there but I still believe they are far overshadowed by the everyday kindness that I experienced from most people there.

Korean girls are hot too. Just sayin'

Korean girls are hot, but fuck that. No amount of hotness is worth that shit. Korea is just one of those places that I always felt I don't belong. Never been there, just through the airports and military bases. Just feel lucky to have dodged that place cause it sounds like a nightmare unless you're an old white GI. Japanese girls may not be as thick but they are a lot more open minded.
(This post was last modified: 03-14-2012 10:49 PM by americanInEurope.)
03-14-2012 10:07 PM
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Vice Offline
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Post: #108
RE: teaching english abroad
Are there any resources out there for getting into international schools? There are multiple American and IB schools in nearly every country now - what does it take to get into those?
03-18-2012 10:27 AM
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Post: #109
RE: teaching english abroad
(03-18-2012 10:27 AM)Vice Wrote:  Are there any resources out there for getting into international schools? There are multiple American and IB schools in nearly every country now - what does it take to get into those?

be a certified teacher not CELTA or TEFL a "real teacher".

Slight chance if you live in that country a long time and have the right contacts you can weasel your way in.
03-18-2012 01:03 PM
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Post: #110
RE: teaching english abroad
Does anyone know how good the opportunities are in the Czech Republic right now? I know a few years ago it was a hotspot for English teachers. Is it still? How is the pay?

The idea is starting to bubble up in my head again as I'm feeling really tired of being in L.A. and would welcome a life change. CR seems like it would be a cool place. Good-looking women plus the benefit of being smack dab in the middle of Europe and within a couple hours flight from a ton of other interesting places.
(This post was last modified: 04-08-2012 12:50 AM by speakeasy.)
04-08-2012 12:49 AM
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RE: teaching english abroad
I live in Korea now.

It's amazing how few unbangable girls there are here. It's the difference between caring about beauty and not caring. Korean girls care. After being around unkempt American girls, seeing girls put effort into her appearance is so appreciated it makes my balls ache.
(This post was last modified: 04-08-2012 03:14 AM by cool.)
04-08-2012 03:13 AM
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Post: #112
RE: teaching english abroad
That's terrible- i wonder how common this is And in wbat countries. i have heard the legal system is also biased in japan, thailand, and the philippines. I can't imagine a white gringo would fare too well in a court dispute with a native in latin america either.

I llove traveling and i've always been impressed with how warm people in other cultures can be- but the idea of somehow getting mixed up with a foreign legal system is the one thing that scares me.
04-08-2012 11:41 PM
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redneckpunk Offline
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Post: #113
RE: teaching english abroad
(04-08-2012 12:49 AM)speakeasy Wrote:  Does anyone know how good the opportunities are in the Czech Republic right now? I know a few years ago it was a hotspot for English teachers. Is it still? How is the pay?

The idea is starting to bubble up in my head again as I'm feeling really tired of being in L.A. and would welcome a life change. CR seems like it would be a cool place. Good-looking women plus the benefit of being smack dab in the middle of Europe and within a couple hours flight from a ton of other interesting places.

for a newbie $700-1,200 a month working 20-25 classroom hours.

rent $400+ a month

need $900 a month to survive in Prague

second tier cities are better options, don't know specifics

never lived or taught there but this should be accurate info, i check most places every year to see what the deal is in case the zombie apocalypse comes.
04-10-2012 08:59 AM
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Post: #114
RE: teaching english abroad
(04-08-2012 12:49 AM)speakeasy Wrote:  Does anyone know how good the opportunities are in the Czech Republic right now? I know a few years ago it was a hotspot for English teachers. Is it still? How is the pay?

The idea is starting to bubble up in my head again as I'm feeling really tired of being in L.A. and would welcome a life change. CR seems like it would be a cool place. Good-looking women plus the benefit of being smack dab in the middle of Europe and within a couple hours flight from a ton of other interesting places.

for a newbie $700-1,200 a month working 20-25 classroom hours.

rent $400+ a month

need $900 a month to survive in Prague

second tier cities are better options, don't know specifics

never lived or taught there but this should be accurate info, i check most places every year to see what the deal is in case the zombie apocalypse comes.
04-10-2012 09:03 AM
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Post: #115
RE: teaching english abroad
I wonder if the Tsunami in japan,, and the Nuclear disaster, has affected these possibilities?

Maybe Japan will sweeten the deal and offer more, if ppl are afraid to go there right now.

Sloots gon' sloot.
04-10-2012 07:18 PM
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RE: teaching english abroad
(04-10-2012 07:18 PM)King Solomon Wrote:  I wonder if the Tsunami in japan,, and the Nuclear disaster, has affected these possibilities?

Maybe Japan will sweeten the deal and offer more, if ppl are afraid to go there right now.
.

nope. It's getting harder to find jobs there actually
04-11-2012 02:43 PM
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Post: #117
RE: teaching english abroad
(04-08-2012 03:13 AM)cool Wrote:  I live in Korea now.

It's amazing how few unbangable girls there are here. It's the difference between caring about beauty and not caring. Korean girls care. After being around unkempt American girls, seeing girls put effort into her appearance is so appreciated it makes my balls ache.

I live in Korea as well. Just walking down the street, you can see women decked out in high heals, ultra-short skirts, and incredibly stylish clothing. The girls here are rarely fat and they keep their appearance on deck like pros.

Occasionally I see a frumpy-ass American white girl with a big backpack or flip flops sticking out like a sore thumb, talking in a super-loud voice to her other overweight friends. The difference between the average Korean girl and the average American girl is phenomenal.
04-29-2012 03:16 AM
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jdreise Offline
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Post: #118
RE: teaching english abroad
(04-11-2012 02:43 PM)redneckpunk Wrote:  
(04-10-2012 07:18 PM)King Solomon Wrote:  I wonder if the Tsunami in japan,, and the Nuclear disaster, has affected these possibilities?

Maybe Japan will sweeten the deal and offer more, if ppl are afraid to go there right now.
.

nope. It's getting harder to find jobs there actually

Agreed. It's not so easy to get a job there. Many employers seem to want you to already have a valid work visa and conversational Japanese ability.

I tried getting a job in Japan from abroad and had no luck. I just took the easier route and went to Thailand. I think if you want to work in Japan your best bet is to be there in person or go with some program like JET.

@memcpy-- How did you go about finding your job in Tokyo?
04-29-2012 10:18 AM
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cybermutiny Offline
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Post: #119
RE: teaching english abroad
jdreise, how is the pay situation in Thailand (i.e. are you able to save some cash)? I've always considered teaching there, but was afraid about the money situation.
04-29-2012 10:50 PM
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jdreise Offline
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Post: #120
RE: teaching english abroad
(04-29-2012 10:50 PM)cybermutiny Wrote:  jdreise, how is the pay situation in Thailand (i.e. are you able to save some cash)? I've always considered teaching there, but was afraid about the money situation.

If you have a year or more of experience then you should be able to find a regular job in BKK that pays for your visa and work permit at around 45,000 baht per month.

Living in BKK, I don't think you'll be able to save very much on that if you like to go out more than just on Friday and Saturday night. I could see saving maybe 10k per month on that salary if you go out 3 or 4 times a week and figure out how to properly use public transportation. You could also just buy a scooter and skip the whole cost of transportation issue but you'd be putting your life on the line.

I've heard it thrown around on ajarn.com that one way to make more cash in BKK is to take a less time-demanding, lower paying regular gig and then get some other side gigs that will supplement that income. Some guys on there claim to be making 70k a month doing just that. I think it would be possible but I don't know.

Now if you want to live in the provinces your experience is going to be different. Most gov't jobs in the provinces pay between 30-40k per month but they're usually not that demanding and things are cheaper than in BKK (with the exception of places like Phuket, Hua Hin, or Pattaya of course). I make 40k/month and I'm able to save about 25-27k of that when I'm not traveling.

I also have a part-time gig four evenings a week that gets me another 5k a month.

I just spent the last month traveling and partying in the south and on the islands and easily blew through 35k-40k. I'm going to do a data sheet on that sometime in the next couple weeks so watch out.

You can save a little money here but you aren't going to do as well as in some place like Korea, Shanghai, or Japan. However, comparitively speaking you'll be doing much better than the locals who are surviving on 4-15k a month.
(This post was last modified: 04-30-2012 01:46 AM by jdreise.)
04-30-2012 01:43 AM
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Screwston Offline
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Post: #121
RE: teaching english abroad
Korea sounds bad from that guy's post. Is it really like that? they go around starting shit with tourists?
04-30-2012 05:27 AM
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cybermutiny Offline
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Post: #122
RE: teaching english abroad
Thanks for the info jdreise.

houston: I've been in Korean for about 16 months and I never saw shit like that. However, old guys do give my Korean girlfriend the death stare all the time. I wait until I catch their eye and give them a wink and a big grin.
04-30-2012 11:12 AM
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Bacchus Offline
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Post: #123
RE: teaching english abroad
I worked as an English teacher in Brazil for a year. It can hone some of your game skills, especially wit, group dynamics, and frame control. Here's my method to survive in a classroom with 7-15 students. I mostly followed the book that my school used. I went page by page. I began class with whatever assignment they had. To stall, I went around the room and called on the students to read the book out loud. I said this was a way for them to practice their pronunciation.

I usually taught the grammar point by explaining it first, giving examples, and then calling on the smartest kids to do it. Then I would ask the class as a whole how to do it. Finally, I would call on the class 'tards, and I didn't move on until they got it.

I had them ask each other questions to practice the grammar point of the lesson. Everyone switched over to Portuguese almost after three sentences, but I just let it slide.

I also taught private conversation classes to students, mostly in small groups, but sometimes one on one. The best thing is to act out situations. Give them the role secretly and have them do it for as long as possible. If they suck at it or lack motivation, gently mock them until they improve their effort. Here are some examples.

A: Try to get B to divulge a secret about someone else.
B: Don't be persuaded to do it.

A: Ask B to give you a ride home.
B: A's house is out of the way, and your time is limited.

A: Call and tell B you can't come to the party on Friday.
B: Try to get A to come to the party. (It's a surprise party for him/her.)

A: Try to get B to smoke marijuana.
B: You don't want to use any illegal drug.

A: Call to order a pizza.
B: Wrong number. You sell pitas, not pizzas.

A: Present B with an unsolicited gift.
B: You do not feel comfortable accepting the gift.

A: Try to get B to go on a date with your niece/nephew.
B: You can't stand A's niece/nephew.

A: You ran over B's favorite pet with your truck. Apologize to him/her.
B: You are very upset with the news. The pet is irreplaceable.

And so on. When I exhausted my list of these situations, I would then get them to describe, narrate, give an opinion, or give instructions to practice how to do these things. Pick topics that will get your student talking. I liked to talk about relationships, friendships, societal customs, music, and cooking. Everyone usually has an opinion, even the most boring students. Another trick is to show youtube clips from movies and ask questions about it. I also brought a list of five phrasal verbs sometimes.
09-11-2012 08:54 PM
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TheGreatKTC Offline
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Post: #124
RE: teaching english abroad
If you do have a few years of experience(or can somehow slip under the radar with a subcontractor), you could end up in Saudi Arabia. It's one of the highest paying places for an ESL teacher.

I won't lie, though. This place is pretty awful.....if you don't establish a good social circle to get you into private parties. It does help your game in the aspect that you have to be super social in order to find the good life in Riyadh. Even then, you have to tread lightly and watch who you associate yourself with.

Only time I would recommend coming here is if you got a side project that you want to complete. Other than that, it's obvious to avoid this place like the plague.
09-11-2012 10:55 PM
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freshcream Offline
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Post: #125
RE: teaching english abroad
Craigslist and Elance has a lot of this. On the fence with applying... Not sure if it's enough to live by.
(This post was last modified: 01-04-2013 04:21 PM by freshcream.)
01-04-2013 04:17 PM
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