12 kids trapped in Thai Cave Complex

Mage

 
Banned
I am willing to bet 100 dollars that in the Hollywood movie made based on this this incident will have a team of diverse divers including at least one woman. That's despite the actual team having no female divers.

The boys will probably be asian looking alright, but most of the divers, definitely the main characters, will be white/black to make the movie understandable for western audiences.
 

Transsimian

Ostrich
Gold Member
Sorry for the scroll

1oquifn6z6a11.png



 

thoughtgypsy

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Repo said:
Just a reminder Elon Musk wasnt even the original founder of Tesla even though he portrays himself that way.

This is a bit off topic, but to expand on that: It was founded by 2 guys who had the knowledge and motivation to start a grassroots car company. They started out (if I'm remembering this right) with a plan of making lower-end EVs based on existing platforms, swapping out the powertrains with an electric one, to preclude a lot of the compliance testing that would be necessary.

They approached Musk during a Mars Society meeting (a group of scientists and investors that routinely meet to discuss ways of colonizing Mars), and he agreed to raise funding for the project. Eventually the original founders got bought out, and later both were asked to finally resign.

The company approach shifted from entry level to premium, and they've had issues trying to break into the lower end at the right price point. Too much over-promising and under-delivering. I think Musk overestimated the demand for and maturity of this technology and has been in damage control mode for a while. Compare this to SpaceX, which builds off of a mature technology, and utilizes the expertise of skilled professionals in the aerospace field.

Years ago, I was friends with a guy who had a group dinner with Musk, and he described him as an egotistical, thin-skinned dweeb. It sounds accurate based on his tweets from the past few months. Not trying to throw salt on the wounds here, but it's also important to realize our limitations and to be careful not to follow false prophets. He would've been fine if he stuck to being the public figure for SpaceX and used his hyping talents to raise funds for a beneficial and profitable enterprise. He should take it as an opportunity to learn from and gain some humility.

It's really a shame that he took it on himself to criticize the divers who saved the lives of others. These guys are real life heroes, who risked their lives at the mere chance of saving those who were powerless to change their situation. Full stop. While it's unfortunate that people can still find something negative in what's one of the most positive stories to come out of the news in years, let's not let it tarnish what happened here.

It's a reminder for us to honor those who walk the walk instead of talk the talk. Usually the heroes are the ones who shy from the spotlight and get on with their duty without praise. Cheers to those brave souls out there.
 

Beyond Borders

Peacock
Gold Member
^ Also, regardless of whether or not Musk's "submarine" would have worked or not, the practical method the divers came up with, putting the kids in those bags and giving them oxygen and multiple divers to pull them out sedated, just seemed to make a lot more sense to me.

Why design and test some entirely new contraption for the job when you can do something like that?

Of course, I don't fault the guy for trying to help, and good on him. But dismissing the refusal to use his sub as the government and divers being ignorant also seems pretty arrogant.

Their method may have been simpler and less flashy, but it also seemed to make more common sense overall.
 

questor70

 
Banned
thoughtgypsy said:
Years ago, I was friends with a guy who had a group dinner with Musk, and he described him as an egotistical, thin-skinned dweeb. It sounds accurate based on his tweets from the past few months. Not trying to throw salt on the wounds here, but it's also important to realize our limitations and to be careful not to follow false prophets.

I'm coming to that conclusion as well. I got really sucked into his vortex but his arrogance has a cost besides his public image, as it's the reason Model 3 production hell happened and continues to happen. He's wasted more money making mistakes at Tesla than entire countries have in GDP. How many people are privileged enough to throw that kind of cash into an incinerator? And we're supposed to look at him in the same light as a Steve Jobs? A shining beacon of american ingenuity? He really should have been replaced as CEO by now at Tesla if there were proper checks and balances. He belongs at SpaceX only.

Beyond Borders said:
dismissing the refusal to use his sub as the government and divers being ignorant also seems pretty arrogant.

The fact everyone got out of the cave alive (except for the one diver) means the only reason for Musk being bitter is butthurt.

It's not a good look to appear butthurt. It comes across as childish. Behind every arrogant man is a mountain of insecurity.

He's got enough high profile projects that a gesture like this should not be seen on his part as a litmus test of his worth.

I really think the guy is always operating on the verge of a complete nervous breakdown and will probably wind up dead or in heavy therapy to work out his issues. Maybe he can get a room next to Johnny Depp and share Amber Heard stories.
 

Richard Turpin

Kingfisher
As the story comes to a close, there's room for one more twist as the soccer team and coach become Buddhist monks (as you do) in order to show their gratitude for their rescue, and the diver who died for them.


MAE SAI, Thailand (AP) - The young soccer teammates and their coach who were rescued after being trapped in a cave in northern Thailand were ordained Wednesday at a Buddhist temple, a merit-making activity to show thanks for their rescue.

The 11 boys, ages 11 to 16, became Buddhist novices in a religious ceremony, while their 25-year-old coach was ordained as a monk. One boy did not participate because he isn't Buddhist.


The full story;

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap...scued-Thai-cave-ordained-Buddhist-temple.html


wire-3752360-1532517494-519_634x364.jpg



I've never been to Thailand and may be being naive, but I gotta say I envy them their pride in their history and culture. Coming from the corpse of the decadent West these kids are way richer than they know.

As an aside, the kids only got out of hospital last week! Tough, resilient people.
 

Beyond Borders

Peacock
Gold Member
^ I think this means only the coach actually became a monk for the long-term, if even that - I think that's why they specifically stated he'll be ordained as a monk. The article seems to deliberately fail to fully explain that the boys will kind of "play" the role of monk as "novices" for a couple weeks or so, if I remember correctly, and go back to living a regular life. In this case the kids may even just be ordained for the ceremony.

It is actually common for most Thai males to do this at least once in their life to win "merit" for their parents.

It is an expectation across the country that EVERY Thai male will become a monk for at least a short period in their life.

This practice, much like compulsory military service in countries like South Korea, usually occurs between the completion of school and the beginning of a career or marriage. It is not unusual however for males under the age of 20 to ‘take robe and bowl’ as novices, because a family earns great merit when a son becomes a monk.

See this content in the original post
The time spent in a wat is traditionally supposed to last for three months and take place during the Buddhist version of lent that begins in July and coincides with the monsoon season.

Nowadays. however. most men spend as little as a week in the temple in order to accrue merit as a monk.

It's heart warming to see the traditions still alive; unfortunately, as the article might suggest, many young Thai men don't take it all too seriously and kind of go through the motions for their parents (not that I'm suggesting the kids don't mean it this time). In fact I run with a lot of Thai guys and other than putting on a good show they don't take much of what Buddhism has to say at all seriously.

In any case, there's, sadly, a lot of hypocrisy and lack of depth in modern Thai Buddhism that is a bit sad to behold if you scratch below the glittering gold foil surface. Lack of depth is in fact a common criticism of the Thai psyche overall, especially in modern times.

I got to give respect to the coach if he did convert fully to monkhood over this out of respect for a life he no doubt felt somewhat responsible for ending, though. Big move; although, mixed public opinion certainly could have played enough of a role to make it a wise decision on multiple fronts.

Anyhow, commendable show of respect and gratitude from all involved. I'm sure in this case the gesture is extremely genuine and heartfelt.
 

Going strong

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
The valiant Thai kids from the cave, have received a very warm welcome a few hours ago in Buenos Aires: they were special guests of Honor at the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games of the Youth, plus they got to play a game of football against River Plate's youth team. :banana:

https://www.infobae.com/america/dep...rtura-de-los-juegos-olimpicos-de-la-juventud/

"Durante el discurso del alemán Thomas Bach, presidente del Comité Olímpico Internacional (COI), en la ceremonia de apertura de los Juegos Olímpicos de la Juventud, hubo un momento muy emotivo. Los 12 niños que junto con su entrenador de fútbol tuvieron en vilo al mundo entero al quedar atrapados en una cueva al norte de Tailandia recibieron un conmovedor homenaje.

"Todos recordamos a aquel grupo de valientes jóvenes tailandeses que estuvo atrapado durante 17 días en una cueva. Los miembros del equipo de fútbol 'Jabalíes Salvajes' demostraron la importancia de estos valores deportivos, por ello los hemos invitados a venir aquí para compartir su experiencia con otros jóvenes atletas. ¡Bienvenidos!", dijo Bach.

Todos los presentes aplaudieron eufóricamente a los pequeños que presenciaron el acto de apertura en una grada, y agradecieron el cariño agachándose con las manos juntas en ritual religioso.

"

Video below:
https://twitter.com/OlympicCh_es/status/1048735349395136512
 

Repo

Hummingbird
Horus said:
https://www.news.com.au/world/asia/handcuffed-drugged-with-ketamine-truth-behind-thai-cave-rescue/news-story/172803c159e20de5cef5dee324266d30

It turns out that the kids were sedated with ketamine before the rescue, and were completely unconscious throughout. They also had their hands handcuffed behind their backs in case they regained consciousness and tried to take off their face mask.

Wow. I think that speaks to the incredible dangerousness of the rescue. No room at all for error with a freakout from one of the kids.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
Ive been a PADI certified diver for over 25 years now. I actually did my PADI Open Water check out dive in Blue Hole Spring in Bradenton FL (pictured below) and my Advanced Open Water cert off Cozumel a couple of years later. I was obsessed with diving for a few years logging hundreds of dives in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico and South Pacific. Its one of the main reasons Ive traveled to as many places as I have. I originally planned to get my Cave Diver cert but did not...for a reason

[img=600x600]https://i.pinimg.com/736x/cf/14/62/...d229e56b--florida-springs-blue-hole.jpg[/img]

That whole area around Bradenton in FL is laced with similar holes and underground springs that create a network of underwater caves. In spite of it being in FL it really is an area with a lot of natural beauty

[img=600x600]https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/4b/21/2c/4b212c9abd5f5a9c91e6e7c8b151ae97.jpg[/img]



There are literally hundreds of fresh water springs that are connected to to that network and you can usually tell there's a cave because of the dark spot in the water. Some spill into rivers, some eventually into the ocean

[img=600x600]https://floridahikes.com/wp-content...3-Merritts-Mill-Pond-JK-89-1280x720.jpg[/img]

Anyway the point is that at each of these springs that have access to a cave network they post signs:

[img=600x600]



Why? Because its incredibly fucking difficult and incredibly fucking dangerous...even with extensive training (as the death of the Thai Seal diver demonstrates)

Open water scuba diving is generally very very safe with relatively little training. Cave diving however is incredibly dangerous even with a lot of training. I learned this the hard way and had two close calls

One of my dive buddies (Dave) back in the day, a guy I did dozens of dives with was close friends with another guy (Todd) that was a certified Cave Diver (CD) and he in turn knew several other CD's.

Long story short Dave and I once tagged along for a low key cave dive in spring near Manatee Springs (I lived in Miami at the time) . These 4 guys had dozens of cave dives between them and fully geared. There were 6 of us with Dave and I being the only ones not certified CD's but Todd vouched for our competence as divers....(classic recipe for disaster ).

We were in a cave that had an entrance in spring with only about 20 ft of depth. The cave was pretty open and the stretch we were in never got deeper than around 50 -60 ft. The dive plan called for us to only go in to the first "chamber" which was less than 100 yards from the cave entrance at the bottom of the spring. I was 3rd in line with two CD's in front of me, Dave behind me and the other two CD's bring up the rear. When we went in we were swimming against the mild current and pulling on an established guide line as this was a frequently dived cave.

We made it to the first chamber uneventfully, took a few photos, the designated dive master indicated it was time to go back with the same 10 foot spacing as on the way in. About a minute into the return swim I hear the 3 metallic raps that was our agreed upon signal to stop (divers commonly tap their air tank with their dive knife to signal other divers). The two guys in front of me stop and turn around to look. Before I could turn to look behind me there was a cloud of silt that enveloped me and almost instantly blinded me.

It went from something like this :

[img=600x600]http://www.danintranet.org/storymedia/6139.jpg[/img]

to this

[img=600x600]https://i.ytimg.com/vi/1DwrMMQhoOM/maxresdefault.jpg[/img]

and it happened in 2-3 seconds

I learned later that Dave who was behind me had kicked the bottom with his fin(a big no no) and the current sent the silt cloud down the tunnel towards the guys in front. What was up to that point a very cool and exciting experience turn instantly terrifying as the lights that were all had were useless in the silt cloud and I could literally not see my hand in front of my face. It was extremely disorienting and scary. I remember telling myself "dont panic or you'll die" and "dont let go of the guide cable or you'll die"...over and over again. It was an intense 1 to maybe 2 minutes before the current cleared enough of the silt that we could see and continue.

I had another incident in a cave later on where I simply turned my head and a rock snagged my regulator hose and yanked the regulator out of my mouth un-unexpectedly. It was only out of my mouth for about 10 seconds before my training kicked in and I recovered the regulator but a second encounter with me forcing myself not to panic in order not die was enough to convince me that, as cool as cave diving is, it wasn't for me.

Its not some major thing that can go wrong but rather the millions of little things that you could never even think of but with deadly consequences that make cave diving so dangerous

The thought of how to navigate this complex network, narrow with a kid that has no training whatsoever and cant even swim is unimaginable.

Is this impossible? No. But its incredibly difficult proposition.

The good news is there are hundreds of years of experience coming together in order create a detailed plan and then execute it. I'm hopeful and optimistic that human ability and spirit will get these kids out safely

Just watched this movie ambout the Thai boys trapped in the cave and then rescued back in 2018. We followed this on RVF as it happened



The movie produced and directed by Ron Howard was actually pretty good and compelling inits own right and IMO was the second miracle associated with this event.
The first obviously was that all the boys made it out alive. It was a harrowing rescue.

The second was that this dramatization of the event did not succumb to woke revision andthe heroes in the movie survived intact as...white men.
 

Chiosboy90

Woodpecker
Just watched this movie ambout the Thai boys trapped in the cave and then rescued back in 2018. We followed this on RVF as it happened



The movie produced and directed by Ron Howard was actually pretty good and compelling inits own right and IMO was the second miracle associated with this event.
The first obviously was that all the boys made it out alive. It was a harrowing rescue.

The second was that this dramatization of the event did not succumb to woke revision andthe heroes in the movie survived intact as...white men.

Me and my wife watched it last night and we both as well enjoyed it very much. I like Vigo Mortenson in almost every movie. White men working together with the locals and in the end even being the heroes of the movie, is a very unusual thing you see. But if this wasnt based on real events, they would change Vigo Mortenson with some gay black no name lesbian actor Im sure of it.
But enough of the black pills. Both for men and women a very enjoyable movie to watch.
 

Caduceus

Ostrich
Was it ever actually revealed how on earth those kids got there in the first place ?
I heard all kinds of wild theories like drug use, drug smuggling, human trafficking, even paedophilia.
Still seems impossible to actually get into such a situation by accident.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant


Little gif for anyone who was thinking about taking up cave diving ^^^

Bumped! The linked GIF is pretty edgy. I went back to Papaya's post about cave diving (linked a few posts above this) around page 6. It was like reliving those events. I visited commercial cave locations in the US, and did guided tours through the back parts of the caves. We squeezed through a lot of really narrow sections like in the GIF, but of course it was dry. We had groups of pre-teen boys both times, and I thought it was a reasonable activity. However, as Papaya's story shows, the added element of water makes the situation very extreme.

Apparently is was fairly common to take groups into this cave. They knew the rainy season was coming, but it wasn't due yet, and under the cultural conditions as the time, the risk was considered reasonable. In fact, from posts earlier in this thread, the people involved probably weren't even thinking in terms of risk assessment like Westerners do in the current year. They didn't see any problem in exploring the cave.

Edit: A later post says this GIF is from Wisconsin. Still representative of the narrowest gap they had to go through in the Thai cave.
 
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