2020 South American Expat Thread

bucky

Ostrich
After browsing this thread, looks like there's not one person on the forum who moved from North America with a wife and at least one child to Latin America?

I would be very much interested in hearing their story. Being single and cruising the planet is one thing, but making a leap with the family is totally different.
My wife is from south of the border. She's a good, devout Catholic girl, as close to perfect as I can imagine a wife being. We lived in her country for a few years, moved down there shortly after my daughter was born. While the other guys make great points about not wanting to live in the US due to the strong possibility of globohomo culture corrupting their hypothetical future kids, on the other hand while my daughter who actually exists is still little I'm very glad we're back in the US now. This is because there's a much higher possibility of her being sexually molested in my wife's country and a much lower chance of my being able to do anything about it if it were to happen, and I think that would be true pretty much anywhere in Latin America.

One of my wife's cousins specifically warned me about one of her uncles, and on a few occasions I saw very young boys in the family do disturbing things to and around my daughter when she wasn't yet two. I wouldn't say that people in my wife's country accept sexually abusing young girls as OK, but there's almost an attitude that it's inevitable. "If a guy has a niece and she's kind of hot, things happen" seemed to be the attitude. It's something you don't pick up on until you actually have a small daughter there and are trying to keep her safe. There's a reason that Latina women who were molested by an uncle when they were little is a trope. I don't miss worrying about it at all.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Robin
Orthodox
My wife is from south of the border. She's a good, devout Catholic girl, as close to perfect as I can imagine a wife being. We lived in her country for a few years, moved down there shortly after my daughter was born. While the other guys make great points about not wanting to live in the US due to the strong possibility of globohomo culture corrupting their hypothetical future kids, on the other hand while my daughter who actually exists is still little I'm very glad we're back in the US now. This is because there's a much higher possibility of her being sexually molested in my wife's country and a much lower chance of my being able to do anything about it if it were to happen, and I think that would be true pretty much anywhere in Latin America.

One of my wife's cousins specifically warned me about one of her uncles, and on a few occasions I saw very young boys in the family do disturbing things to and around my daughter when she wasn't yet two. I wouldn't say that people in my wife's country accept sexually abusing young girls as OK, but there's almost an attitude that it's inevitable. "If a guy has a niece and she's kind of hot, things happen" seemed to be the attitude. It's something you don't pick up on until you actually have a small daughter there and are trying to keep her safe. There's a reason that Latina women who were molested by an uncle when they were little is a trope. I don't miss worrying about it at all.
Hi Bucky,

Thank you for the reply. What you wrote makes sense. If there's no or little safety, especially for your kids, most of other criteria might fade in comparison.

There's a lot of single guys and men posting here. Some of them might appear a bit cocky about resisting or fighting the globohomo. But they dont have a tiny human being to be responsible for....

My wife's region where she's from in South America is not as unsafe or filled with sexual predators like what you describe. But after my wife had some serious complications during her first pregnancy, quality of medical care is very important to us now.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Hi Bucky,

Thank you for the reply. What you wrote makes sense. If there's no or little safety, especially for your kids, most of other criteria might fade in comparison.

There's a lot of single guys and men posting here. Some of them might appear a bit cocky about resisting or fighting the globohomo. But they dont have a tiny human being to be responsible for....

My wife's region where she's from in South America is not as unsafe or filled with sexual predators like what you describe. But after my wife had some serious complications during her first pregnancy, quality of medical care is very important to us now.
Globohomo is a legitimate concern to be sure, but yeah, your attitude toward it and how you balance it vs. the downsides of a place like Latin America or the FSU is different when you actually have kids of your own and skin in the game.

I don't know what part of SA your wife is from, which is fine, I also avoid saying the specific country my wife is from to avoid getting doxxed, but I really wonder if it's much better in regard to sexual abuse of little girls and teenage girls. A long time ago when I was single I was hanging out with a female friend of mine from Argentina downtown in my city and we had to make our way through a big, tight crowd of guys watching a football game on a monitor outside a bar. I thought nothing particularly of it, but after we got through the crowd she remarked how great it was that she could do that in the US because in her country she'd have been guaranteed at least getting groped. In all the countries I've been to south of the border, with the possible exception of Costa Rica, I've constantly seen all the street harassment that US feminists complain about but I never really see here, and my wife and other Latinas I know in the US mention pretty frequently how nice it is to be here and feel safe from that kind of thing and worse.

As far as globohomo, its hand is certainly less powerful in most Latin American countries, although there are some where it's getting pretty close to the US. This is just my opinion, but I still think you have a fighting chance of resisting it when raising your kids in the US if you homeschool your kids, have Christ in your life and, especially in the case of little girls, be a gentle-yet-strong-and-masculine father who leaves no doubt in their mind that there's nothing more important in your life than them. I like to model my parenting style after Ward Cleaver, myself (not sure if those younger than Gen X are still familiar with that reference, but if you're not, he's worth looking up).
 
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thetruewhitenorth

Robin
Orthodox
Globohomo is a legitimate concern to be sure, but yeah, your attitude toward it and how you balance it vs. the downsides of a place like Latin America or the FSU is different when you actually have kids of your own and skin in the game.

I don't know what part of SA your wife is from, which is fine, I also avoid saying the specific country my wife is from to avoid getting doxxed, but I really wonder if it's much better in regard to sexual abuse of little girls and teenage girls. A long time ago when I was single I was hanging out with a female friend of mine from Argentina downtown in my city and we had to make our way through a big, tight crowd of guys watching a football game on a monitor outside a bar. I thought nothing particularly of it, but after we got through the crowd she remarked how great it was that she could do that in the US because in her country she'd have been guaranteed at least getting groped. In all the countries I've been to south of the border, with the possible exception of Costa Rica, I've constantly seen all the street harassment that US feminists complain about but I never really see here, and my wife and other Latinas I know in the US mention pretty frequently how nice it is to be here and feel safe from that kind of thing and worse.

As far as globohomo, its hand is certainly less powerful in most Latin American countries, although there are some where it's getting pretty close to the US. This is just my opinion, but I still think you have a fighting chance of resisting it when raising your kids in the US if you homeschool your kids, have Christ in your life and, especially in the case of little girls, be a gentle-yet-strong-and-masculine father who leaves no doubt in their mind that there's nothing more important in your life than them. I like to model my parenting style after Ward Cleaver, myself (not sure if those younger than Gen X are still familiar with that reference, but if you're not, he's worth looking up).
My wife told me about similar experiences, especially in bigger cities when being groped or mugged is oftentimes is a legitimate concern, and it is something you always have on your mind. I guess in US or Canada we take safety for granted.

I think a lot about the kind of future I want for my kids and I honestly wish they had same innocent childhood I had growing up - almost no politics, no internet, no cellphones, no fast food, lots of outdoor play, summers spent in the country.

But then I realize thats all just a fallacy. Each time period has its cons and pros. If, for instance, more and more kids grow up in secular households doing secular stuff like playing video games, consuming junk food and getting brainwashed.

Then, by not doing all of the above, having Christ with us, staying together with my wife, our children would be already ahead of maybe 80-90% of other kids in terms of health, moral compass, and overall development?

Just like an adult by not smoking nor drinking, regularly exercising, and eating healthy home made meals. Wouldnt these simple rules put you perhaps among top 5-10% of the population health-wise?

Btw, I looked up Ward Cleaver. I shall find these TV series and give it a try. Looks like a good, Christian stuff.
 
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LoveBug

Kingfisher
My wife is from south of the border. She's a good, devout Catholic girl, as close to perfect as I can imagine a wife being. We lived in her country for a few years, moved down there shortly after my daughter was born. While the other guys make great points about not wanting to live in the US due to the strong possibility of globohomo culture corrupting their hypothetical future kids, on the other hand while my daughter who actually exists is still little I'm very glad we're back in the US now. This is because there's a much higher possibility of her being sexually molested in my wife's country and a much lower chance of my being able to do anything about it if it were to happen, and I think that would be true pretty much anywhere in Latin America.

One of my wife's cousins specifically warned me about one of her uncles, and on a few occasions I saw very young boys in the family do disturbing things to and around my daughter when she wasn't yet two. I wouldn't say that people in my wife's country accept sexually abusing young girls as OK, but there's almost an attitude that it's inevitable. "If a guy has a niece and she's kind of hot, things happen" seemed to be the attitude. It's something you don't pick up on until you actually have a small daughter there and are trying to keep her safe. There's a reason that Latina women who were molested by an uncle when they were little is a trope. I don't miss worrying about it at all.

Thats the thing in those countries; if a girl is semi attractive she is getting pushed up on by all sorts of men when they are very young.

Not only that, but what I've noticed in Latin America where I've stayed is that the girls, along with potentially getting married earlier, start to couple earlier. Go to the malls and you will see rows of 14/15 year old girls already with serious boyfriends. When there is less to do, in poorer countries without first world frills, it leads to more romantic activity IMO

Some of that can change if girls are raised in a more closed environment around money, which a lot of the upper class more European blooded girls are I suppose

If I got married and had a daughter with a lot of European blood, which is coveted, I dont know if Id feel more comfortable with her going to the markets or Centro etc., depending on the country
 

scotian

Peacock
Gold Member
I recently got my residency approved for MX. Job is going to let me go / fire me on December 8th so I plan to fly down right after that to get my actual residency card, then explore for a while. I know some freedom-minded people in central MX that I plan to meet up and perhaps build some network there.

Anyone have any trip reports or have any local insight into how things are going there? I hear Oaxaca is planning a vaxx pass so I'll be avoiding that area...Queretaro seems like a great place to spend some time in.
I spent a few days in Queretero city a couple of years ago and it’s now my second favourite city in the country, after Merida. The two are both very safe, clean and pleasant cities although for some people they could get boring as nightlife options are limited but if you’re at a stage in your life where you value safety and cleanliness over access to big night clubs and beach parties, Queretero may be a good option. The weather is much cooler than in Merida (still hot though for me), it has the highest per capita income in the country due to the amount of foreign industry in the area (auto, aerospace, biotech, etc) and is close enough to the capital that weekend or day trips are easy (<3 hours by bus). Given the presence of foreign factories, the locals seem well educated and professional by Mexican standards, there is a noticeable absence of riff raff on the streets which is nice, I had to worry working back to my hotel late at night.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
Globohomo is a legitimate concern to be sure, but yeah, your attitude toward it and how you balance it vs. the downsides of a place like Latin America or the FSU is different when you actually have kids of your own and skin in the game.. A long time ago when I was single I was hanging out with a female friend of mine from Argentina downtown in my city and we had to make our way through a big, tight crowd of guys watching a football game on a monitor outside a bar. I thought nothing particularly of it, but after we got through the crowd she remarked how great it was that she could do that in the US because in her country she'd have been guaranteed at least getting groped. In all the countries I've been to south of the border, with the possible exception of Costa Rica, I've constantly seen all the street harassment that US feminists complain about

Well, your lady friend from Argentina was greatly exaggerating, or more probably wanting to impress. I've been countless times with male or female friends in Argentine bars to watch football, as you described, and never was a lady friend of ours, "groped". It might happen in a nightclub, but in a regular bar of Buenos Aires it would be extremely surprising.

Also, people on this thread seem to think that South Americans are tolerant regarding "dirty uncles/neighbours". I'm not sure about that. Here in Argentina, if it is known that some dirty neighbour has "molested" a young girl, the people burn the house of the offender, on the spot.

So I guess you're partially right. There's no lenghty trial, but the perp has his house burnt, quickly.
 

oldfaith

Robin
Orthodox
I don't know Spanish, unfortunately...
Is there any information on QR codes deployed in South America so far?
QR codes to enter supermarkets, gyms, government offices etc are spreading like wildfire in Eurasia.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
I'm in Buenos Aires, there's no health pass implemented, no bothersome QR, and everything is open, all shops/gyms are open with no hassle.

A few days ago the capital city even cancelled the mask mandate in open spaces. Well, 80% of the Argentine people still wear it nonetheless, in the streets, but, each day the percentage of mask-wearers gets lower. A breeze of freedom for all, plus, Summer is coming fast. I might also add that the US Dollar has reached all-time highs against the peso on the informal market. So, Argentina indeed has a lot of positive things going.
 

oldfaith

Robin
Orthodox
I'm in Buenos Aires, there's no health pass implemented, no bothersome QR, and everything is open, all shops/gyms are open with no hassle.

A few days ago the capital city even cancelled the mask mandate in open spaces. Well, 80% of the Argentine people still wear it nonetheless, in the streets, but, each day the percentage of mask-wearers gets lower. A breeze of freedom for all, plus, Summer is coming fast. I might also add that the US Dollar has reached all-time highs against the peso on the informal market. So, Argentina indeed has a lot of positive things going.

That's good to know (except that 80% still wear masks). Of course it's summer, elsewhere it mostly gets relaxed for the summer too.
In summer less respiratory diseases so hard to find things for fear-mongering.

Curious does anyone have any info on Paraguay? I can't figure out what's going on there.
Earlier this year they supposedly published the lists of the vaccinated, so that everyone could identify "safe" people, pretty weird stuff.
 
I spent a few days in Queretero city a couple of years ago and it’s now my second favourite city in the country, after Merida. The two are both very safe, clean and pleasant cities although for some people they could get boring as nightlife options are limited but if you’re at a stage in your life where you value safety and cleanliness over access to big night clubs and beach parties, Queretero may be a good option. The weather is much cooler than in Merida (still hot though for me), it has the highest per capita income in the country due to the amount of foreign industry in the area (auto, aerospace, biotech, etc) and is close enough to the capital that weekend or day trips are easy (<3 hours by bus). Given the presence of foreign factories, the locals seem well educated and professional by Mexican standards, there is a noticeable absence of riff raff on the streets which is nice, I had to worry working back to my hotel late at night.
Thanks for the insight. I'm not much into nightlife and partying but would like to meet people and hang out at bars/lounges from time to time. I may fly into the area and stay there for a few weeks first then.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
Today, and smartly, Argentina has removed a big hurdle for medium- or long-term tourists. These tourists will now be allowed to open Argentine bank accounts, even remotely, and then access funds at a rate very close to the informal "blue rate".

So it enables a regular first-world tourist, afraid to carry large sums in cash, to go to Argentina and once here, use a credit card (linked to his home bank through an Argentine bank) with a quite good exchange rate. Good news for the tourists who dislike carrying hundreds or thousands of dollars.

In other news, we've had over 30 degrees Celcius here in Buenos Aires these last two days, it's hot Summer time already, and Covid has like, disappeared from the news and minds.
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Today, and smartly, Argentina has removed a big hurdle for medium- or long-term tourists. These tourists will now be allowed to open Argentine bank accounts, even remotely, and then access funds at a rate very close to the informal "blue rate".

So it enables a regular first-world tourist, afraid to carry large sums in cash, to go to Argentina and once here, use a credit card (linked to his home bank through an Argentine bank) with a quite good exchange rate. Good news for the tourists who dislike carrying hundreds or thousands of dollars.

In other news, we've had over 30 degrees Celcius here in Buenos Aires these last two days, it's hot Summer time already, and Covid has like, disappeared from the news and minds.
For Americans, looking a U.S. embassy website, we are not permitted to enter unless we meet an exception.
 

LoveBug

Kingfisher
Excited tomorrow to pay homage to the greatest Central American historical figure as far as I'm concerned, William Walker. Going to see where he's buried in Trujillo, Honduras. Also hope to see where the first mass was celebrated in Continental America, in Trujillo.

Walker was a Northern European American who tried to take over some parts of the region as a "filibuster". Hanging in Central America I've often heard references to and about him over the years (I enjoyed visiting some places about his rule in Nicaragua)
 

LoveBug

Kingfisher
I really wish I liked some aspects of Honduras more, because I feel my SMV is quite high to finding Mrs. Right

In the last year and a half Ive spent good time in Guatemala/Mexico/Ecuador/Honduras (I'll be in El Salvador next for my quest to find the perfect Latin American set for me)

Without question I've received in my opinion the most female attention here from my vantage. Its also the place I've seen the fewest gringos - count them 2 in mainland Honduras (they mostly stay on the islands). Ive mostly stayed in San Pedro Sula/La Ceiba and have just visited Trujillo. There might be a connection here, between fewest gringos and SMV. Ive had a steady stream of interested eye contact (and if your abroad long enough you know the difference between looking at the strange gringo and attraction). Been screamed at. Tonight, I had the craving for a late night dinner, and a bunch of young 20 something girls picked me up randomly, made phone calls to find the food I wanted, and the main girl asked for my WhatsApp after dropping me off

At this point I'm a scruffy mochilero winging it on about 2k a month. My father is a multimillionaire, and at some point I will see more of that inheritance, but not now. So prices are important at this stage. I feel as if the prices are a tick higher than Ecuador and Mexico for example, and maybe needlessly as I dont think wages match that. AirBnB's are all seemingly over 17 a night, and you can get a good 10 room quite easily elsewhere. Cokes on the street are a full dollar instead of maybe 50 cents elsewhere. A 3-4 dollar sopa de Cameron on the beach in Ecuador might cost 6 here from my experience. And the beaches have sucked, as a beach bum, from what I've seen. The beaches near La Ceiba were brown, with garbage strewn. In Trujillo, calm waters without the waves and a weird algae (? what to call it, plant stuff) by a lot of the bay. I've heard from locals that like Tela/Cortes though I haven't been. I was warned against public transportation in Sa Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa due crime (and that sucks as a mochilero you cant ride public transport in the major cities). I don't particularly like gluten so I'm partial to the corn societies, here the main dish is a huge non corn tortilla filled food called a baleada.

But this is just my experience. I'm not expert on these countries, and I might be wrong
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I really wish I liked some aspects of Honduras more, because I feel my SMV is quite high to finding Mrs. Right

In the last year and a half Ive spent good time in Guatemala/Mexico/Ecuador/Honduras (I'll be in El Salvador next for my quest to find the perfect Latin American set for me)

Without question I've received in my opinion the most female attention here from my vantage. Its also the place I've seen the fewest gringos - count them 2 in mainland Honduras (they mostly stay on the islands). Ive mostly stayed in San Pedro Sula/La Ceiba and have just visited Trujillo. There might be a connection here, between fewest gringos and SMV. Ive had a steady stream of interested eye contact (and if your abroad long enough you know the difference between looking at the strange gringo and attraction). Been screamed at. Tonight, I had the craving for a late night dinner, and a bunch of young 20 something girls picked me up randomly, made phone calls to find the food I wanted, and the main girl asked for my WhatsApp after dropping me off

At this point I'm a scruffy mochilero winging it on about 2k a month. My father is a multimillionaire, and at some point I will see more of that inheritance, but not now. So prices are important at this stage. I feel as if the prices are a tick higher than Ecuador and Mexico for example, and maybe needlessly as I dont think wages match that. AirBnB's are all seemingly over 17 a night, and you can get a good 10 room quite easily elsewhere. Cokes on the street are a full dollar instead of maybe 50 cents elsewhere. A 3-4 dollar sopa de Cameron on the beach in Ecuador might cost 6 here from my experience. And the beaches have sucked, as a beach bum, from what I've seen. The beaches near La Ceiba were brown, with garbage strewn. In Trujillo, calm waters without the waves and a weird algae (? what to call it, plant stuff) by a lot of the bay. I've heard from locals that like Tela/Cortes though I haven't been. I was warned against public transportation in Sa Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa due crime (and that sucks as a mochilero you cant ride public transport in the major cities). I don't particularly like gluten so I'm partial to the corn societies, here the main dish is a huge non corn tortilla filled food called a baleada.

But this is just my experience. I'm not expert on these countries, and I might be wrong
Have you felt in danger at all throughout Honduras?
 

LoveBug

Kingfisher
Have you felt in danger at all throughout Honduras?

It takes a lot to throw me off. I'm 6'3, bodybuild, have seen a lot, and probably take chances I shouldn't

Its still one of the most violent countries in the Americas, no doubt, particularly in big cities, but I haven't felt in danger personally. I'd watch where I'd wander at night in some of the big cities, or even rural parts where the are drugs flow, but other than that, no I personally haven't
 

Parmesan

Woodpecker
It takes a lot to throw me off. I'm 6'3, bodybuild, have seen a lot, and probably take chances I shouldn't

Its still one of the most violent countries in the Americas, no doubt, particularly in big cities, but I haven't felt in danger personally. I'd watch where I'd wander at night in some of the big cities, or even rural parts where the are drugs flow, but other than that, no I personally haven't
As a 6'3 gringo I imagine you'd get a fair amount of attention all over LatAm. Is Honduras especially increased to justify the quality of life hassles? I'm nearly the same height, from the tallest, whitest region of the US. In statistically shorter areas of the US, and even vain Miami I notice I get more attention from Latinas and Asian/White height groupies than I do in my home region (vacation buzz is always a factor though).
 

Dilated

Woodpecker
I really wish I liked some aspects of Honduras more, because I feel my SMV is quite high to finding Mrs. Right

In the last year and a half Ive spent good time in Guatemala/Mexico/Ecuador/Honduras (I'll be in El Salvador next for my quest to find the perfect Latin American set for me)

Without question I've received in my opinion the most female attention here from my vantage. Its also the place I've seen the fewest gringos - count them 2 in mainland Honduras (they mostly stay on the islands). Ive mostly stayed in San Pedro Sula/La Ceiba and have just visited Trujillo. There might be a connection here, between fewest gringos and SMV. Ive had a steady stream of interested eye contact (and if your abroad long enough you know the difference between looking at the strange gringo and attraction). Been screamed at. Tonight, I had the craving for a late night dinner, and a bunch of young 20 something girls picked me up randomly, made phone calls to find the food I wanted, and the main girl asked for my WhatsApp after dropping me off

At this point I'm a scruffy mochilero winging it on about 2k a month. My father is a multimillionaire, and at some point I will see more of that inheritance, but not now. So prices are important at this stage. I feel as if the prices are a tick higher than Ecuador and Mexico for example, and maybe needlessly as I dont think wages match that. AirBnB's are all seemingly over 17 a night, and you can get a good 10 room quite easily elsewhere. Cokes on the street are a full dollar instead of maybe 50 cents elsewhere. A 3-4 dollar sopa de Cameron on the beach in Ecuador might cost 6 here from my experience. And the beaches have sucked, as a beach bum, from what I've seen. The beaches near La Ceiba were brown, with garbage strewn. In Trujillo, calm waters without the waves and a weird algae (? what to call it, plant stuff) by a lot of the bay. I've heard from locals that like Tela/Cortes though I haven't been. I was warned against public transportation in Sa Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa due crime (and that sucks as a mochilero you cant ride public transport in the major cities). I don't particularly like gluten so I'm partial to the corn societies, here the main dish is a huge non corn tortilla filled food called a baleada.

But this is just my experience. I'm not expert on these countries, and I might be wrong

How would you compare to Honduras to Ecuador? I’ve been in Ecuador since Summer 2020 but have never been to Honduras.
 
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