2020 South American Expat Thread

I lived in Chile for almost two years and would love to go back. Was thinking about it in Dec - Jan. but it seemed to be STILL way messed up with the Covid hoax. They bought it lock, stock and two smoking barrels. So I'm here in Mexico, for now. The main / best info source for Chile (allchile.net) was recently shit-canned by the forum owner Charles Spencer. Completely unannounced by the way. Douchebag.

I'm tempted to just pack-up and go since I know five different Chilean officials will tell me five different things. That's kinda what I loved about the place. There was always a way around any bureaucratic problems.

Does anyone have any current info?
 

Caractacus Potts

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Ella / la / le ? :)

It's absolutely ridiculous a few of the conversations about taking gender out of the spanish language. I've heard people laugh about it, but that's the first step...getting them to talk about it.

Ella / la / le ? :)

It's absolutely ridiculous a few of the conversations about taking gender out of the spanish language. I've heard people laugh about it, but that's the first step...getting them to talk about it.
Nope. She/her/hers
This disturbs me greatly as I was eyeing her as a potential long term candidate. She may be infected with the American poz. :(
 

aeroektar

Pelican
Nicaragua intrigues me.

It has beaches, mountains, different climates, but generally a tropical lush environment.

Rates of violent crime are lower then anywhere else in Latan America, which I know doesn't tell the whole story but is a good overall indicator.

Obesity rates are low, or at least some of the lowest in Latin America.

It's one of the least visited countries in Latin America. I'm personally not a fan of places overrun with tourists.

I don't get the impression that locals try to hustle foreigners the way Colombians or Mexicans have a reputation of doing.

There's a couple nice small cities that could be nice to base yourself out of that are within an hour or two drive of the big city Managua and beaches.

The women seem to be overall good Christian women who are family oriented and conservative (obviously not all of them).
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Other Christian
Gold Member
Nicaragua intrigues me.
#MeToo

Hello world I am Uncle Cr33pin a jacked white male with the beard of Zeus, my pronouns are He/Him

Nicaragua is still intriguing me and on my radar as well. I think I will go ahead and follow through my process of getting residency here in Panama.(its a steal at 3k USD) Then I will always have Panama as a option or fall back plan. However I think later next year I will drive up to Nicaragua and check things out for sure. Really it seems like the biggest thing it has going for it over Panama would be the cost of living. Cause Panama seems to be able to provide all the same benefits of Nicaragua only at a higher price. Panama has better health care than Nicaragua also... for some people that's a big deciding factor, but with my zinc and apple cider vinegar regimen I don't see myself ever needing healthcare or perishing before I turn 200-250 years old.



Also Mexico is on the radar a bit.... I keep hearing from many expats down here that Mexico is just as good or better for retiring then Panama. Perhaps its destiny as the last line in my favorite song of all time maybe actually come to fruition for me.


^^Saw them in concert in Ukraine and it was amazing^^
 

COtrailrider

Sparrow
Gnostic or New Age
#MeToo

Hello world I am Uncle Cr33pin a jacked white male with the beard of Zeus, my pronouns are He/Him

Nicaragua is still intriguing me and on my radar as well. I think I will go ahead and follow through my process of getting residency here in Panama.(its a steal at 3k USD) Then I will always have Panama as a option or fall back plan. However I think later next year I will drive up to Nicaragua and check things out for sure. Really it seems like the biggest thing it has going for it over Panama would be the cost of living. Cause Panama seems to be able to provide all the same benefits of Nicaragua only at a higher price. Panama has better health care than Nicaragua also... for some people that's a big deciding factor, but with my zinc and apple cider vinegar regimen I don't see myself ever needing healthcare or perishing before I turn 200-250 years old.



Also Mexico is on the radar a bit.... I keep hearing from many expats down here that Mexico is just as good or better for retiring then Panama. Perhaps its destiny as the last line in my favorite song of all time maybe actually come to fruition for me.


^^Saw them in concert in Ukraine and it was amazing^^
Which areas in MX did they recommend? Thinking about flying into CDMX soon then immediately making my way to SMA/Queretaro area to process my residency visa and explore the area. I hear Puerto Vallarta is good too - lots of expats.

I keep hearing MX has really high mask compliance though, so will they really push back when CBDCs and vaxx passes come around? Many states in MX continue hinting that they'll be enforcing some paperwork checks to access various places, and then I hear AMLO and the health secretary say nothing will be mandatory. It's tough to see through the noise.
 

LoveBug

Kingfisher
Catholic
#MeToo

Hello world I am Uncle Cr33pin a jacked white male with the beard of Zeus, my pronouns are He/Him

Nicaragua is still intriguing me and on my radar as well. I think I will go ahead and follow through my process of getting residency here in Panama.(its a steal at 3k USD) Then I will always have Panama as a option or fall back plan. However I think later next year I will drive up to Nicaragua and check things out for sure. Really it seems like the biggest thing it has going for it over Panama would be the cost of living. Cause Panama seems to be able to provide all the same benefits of Nicaragua only at a higher price. Panama has better health care than Nicaragua also... for some people that's a big deciding factor, but with my zinc and apple cider vinegar regimen I don't see myself ever needing healthcare or perishing before I turn 200-250 years old.



Also Mexico is on the radar a bit.... I keep hearing from many expats down here that Mexico is just as good or better for retiring then Panama. Perhaps its destiny as the last line in my favorite song of all time maybe actually come to fruition for me.


^^Saw them in concert in Ukraine and it was amazing^^

I like the song, though not as much as you, and when that line comes I alter it in my mind to “I might end up somewhere [south] of Mexico”

It’s a soulful/introspective line (song).
 
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Brother Abdul Majeed

Kingfisher
Catholic
Gold Member
A quick update from Bocas del Toro, Panama:

Life slowly feels as if is getting back to a sense of normalcy. Masks are now not obligatory everywhere, however, a minority of the Chinese shopkeepers still insist (as is their right to do so) that you put one on before entering their shops. They are not necessary in restaurants and bars, except for the staff. Occasionally the ministry of health peons will do inspections to ensure that the staff are working within the guidelines, but this is fairly infrequent, and everybody on the island knows when they will be around because they have to bring their truck on the ferry, so all the business owners get tipped off before they come. Bars are still not allowed to have people seated by the bar on stools, but this is generally ignored. It's actually quite easy to get in good with the local officials, and they will turn a blind eye if they like you well enough.

I would guess that about 30% of people wear masks outside. I find it ridiculous to see people riding their bicycles down the road wearing a mask, but I can't blame them. The Panamanian media has done a great job frightening the people, and most of them aren't sophisticated enough to know about alternative media. Central Americans tend to be very compliant folk.

Tourism is slowly creeping back. December and January are always good months here because of the waves during these months. This attracts a lot of surfers. This year I would estimate that tourism is about at 40% of what a normal year should be. This is a vast improvement over last year when the hotels, bars and restaurants were completely shut down, and there was only a handful of hippie tourists who managed to get stranded here when international travel was shut down. Business is nowhere near what the business owners would like it to be, but at least most places are open now. A few didn't manage to make it through the shutdowns though, and there are a few empty storefronts, but it isn't drastic. There have always been places that open and close. Many people think that running a business on a tourist island will be a slam-dunk, but they are sadly mistaken. It can be very challenging here, even in the best of times.

Prices in the shops have risen slightly, but nothing drastic. Everything here has always been more expensive than on the mainland due to "island pricing". It just costs more to get things here. There has been a noticeable increase in power outages and internet disruptions, but I'm not sure why that is.

For the most part, most of the military have left, and the regular police are policing the island again. The only Aeronaval personnel left are the usual troop that monitor the coast for the drug boats that pass by on their way north. There was actually a pretty big bust a couple of months ago.

I do not know how many people have been jabbed. they were jabbing people at the local high school a few weeks ago for a couple of weeks. I suspect compliance is fairly high, but most of the people I have spoken to about the subject are still unjabbed. I suppose this is just a bias on my part, as I would never broach the subject with people who I know to be "normies". There are a surprising number of normies in the expat community, but generally people here stay off the subject of politics. Occasionally American tourists will start talking about political issues, it seems as if they can't escape that, even when they are on their holidays. Must be a miserable way to live.

I personally have been pretty lethargic the last few months and have put off many things that I should have been doing, so now there's a pile of things I have to get done in the next few weeks. I haven't tended to my farm in ages, and it will be quite the task to get everything back to where I hope it would be. Instead I have been staying in town trying to tend to a business I have there. Because of the lack of business lately I have had to make do with a skeleton staff which requires me to be there almost daily. hopefully with a further bump in tourism I can hire a couple more staff and free my time up to go live at the farm again. I also need to get the transmission of my truck repaired, so that means I will have to go to David to get it done. I'm not looking forward to a four and a half hour drive across the mountains with a dodgy transmission, but there's no other way to get it done. David is the closest town with competent mechanics. There is a closer town called Changuinola, but people there will see my Gringo butt pull into their work bay and the dollar signs will light up in their eyes.

@Cr33pin, I'll send to a PM when I decide on the date of my journey. If you are still in Chiriqi, perhaps we can meet up for a wobblypop and a meal.
 

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
A friend from there was really complaining about the new president. I can't really comment too much more but they call the protests "Estallido Social"

TLDR: The people went on a BLM style protest and destroyed their own subway. Real Smart.

The 2019–2021 Chilean protests, known in Chile as the Estallido Social (lit. social outburst),[13][14] are a series of massive demonstrations and severe riots originated in Santiago and spread to all regions of Chile, with a greater impact in the main cities, such as Greater Valparaíso, Greater Concepción, Greater La Serena, Arica, Iquique, Antofagasta, Rancagua, Chillán, Temuco, Valdivia, Osorno, Puerto Montt and Punta Arenas, developed mainly between October 2019 and March 2020. Civil protests took place throughout Chile in response to a raise in the Santiago Metro's subway fare, the increased corruption,[15][16][17][dubiousdiscuss] cost of living, privatisation and inequality prevalent in the country.[18][19][20][21][22]

The protests began in Chile's capital, Santiago, as a coordinated fare evasion campaign by secondary school students which led to spontaneous takeovers of the city's main train stations and open confrontations with the Carabineros de Chile (the national police force). On 18 October, the situation escalated as a group of people began vandalizing city's infrastructure; seizing, vandalizing, and burning down many stations of the Santiago Metro network and disabling them with extensive infrastructure damage, and for a time causing the cessation of the network in its entirety. Eighty-one stations have sustained major damage, including seventeen burned down.[23][24] On the same day, President of Chile Sebastián Piñera announced a state of emergency, authorizing the deployment of Chilean Army forces across the main regions to enforce order and prevent the destruction of public property, and invoked before the courts the Ley de Seguridad del Estado ("State Security Law") against dozens of detainees. A curfew was declared on 19 October in the Greater Santiago area.[25][26]

Wikipedia
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Pelican
Catholic
Gold Member
Yeah, I remember the mostly peaceful protests down there a few years ago but assumed it was a loud but relatively small group of agitators (there were also similar mostly peaceful protests in Argentina a few weeks either before or after, which had me wondering if the globalists were actually shipping people around from one part of South America to another). They also vandalized and desecrated several churches from what I remember. Guess the best case scenario for Chile now is to turn into Argentina, with Venezuela or Nicaragua a distinct possibility.
 

Mountaineer

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
It's very probable these groups are shipped around. Last time I was in Spain I met a group of 15 young women from Colombia. I was surprised to learn that despite them being feminine and charitable to me their reason for travel was next day's feminist/LGBT rally/protest. And I met them in one of the most expensive restaurants in town. It's clear to me that no girl from that group paid for her trip and meal out of her own pocket. Somebody financed that group to come there and protest.
 
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