26 year old doctor ...two years post graduation... lost drive and confidence

El Chinito loco

Crow
Gold Member
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
The U.S. medical field is inundated with people from the subcontinent and Jews. Which means healthcare is really for the rich and everyone else gets shit care from these "doctors" who are just there to game medicare.

Provide some evidence or GTFO.

Did this trigger you? oh my apologies. I retract everything, m'lord.

No - you are just full of shit - there are people from all backgrounds who game Medicare, and there is nothing to suggest that subcontinental/Jewish doctors do it more or less than anyone else.

From my experiences which includes a dead grandmother with alzheimers it's absolutely true.
 
El Chinito loco said:
thedarkknight said:
El Chinito loco said:
First of all are you really from the U.K. and are you really black?

Have you considered trying to come to the U.S.

The U.S. medical field is inundated with people from the subcontinent and Jews. Which means healthcare is really for the rich and everyone else gets shit care from these "doctors" who are just there to game medicare.

You're a young doctor who can make bank off America's broken healthcare system as well as score some pretty nice pussy with your accent. Plus you will get incredible bonus points for being from an ultra protected minority class on top of that.

You're in the upper tier social status and as long as you're not too neurotic (like many medical professionals) you can make it work.

....like space lol

If I had these credentials and in the position you were in I would fucking sprint and not walk to find out how to immigrate to the U.S.

I'm not being sarcastic at all but it's just true. A black U.K. doctor you should theoretically recieve an incredible status bump compared to where you are now.

Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get into a residency program, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US compared to the UK, but a lot of US doctors still dislike the field for a variety of reasons.
 

El Chinito loco

Crow
Gold Member
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
thedarkknight said:
El Chinito loco said:
First of all are you really from the U.K. and are you really black?

Have you considered trying to come to the U.S.

The U.S. medical field is inundated with people from the subcontinent and Jews. Which means healthcare is really for the rich and everyone else gets shit care from these "doctors" who are just there to game medicare.

You're a young doctor who can make bank off America's broken healthcare system as well as score some pretty nice pussy with your accent. Plus you will get incredible bonus points for being from an ultra protected minority class on top of that.

You're in the upper tier social status and as long as you're not too neurotic (like many medical professionals) you can make it work.

....like space lol

If I had these credentials and in the position you were in I would fucking sprint and not walk to find out how to immigrate to the U.S.

I'm not being sarcastic at all but it's just true. A black U.K. doctor you should theoretically recieve an incredible status bump compared to where you are now.

Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get a residency spot, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US, but a lot of US doctors dislike the field for a variety of reasons.


2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?
 
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
thedarkknight said:
El Chinito loco said:
First of all are you really from the U.K. and are you really black?

Have you considered trying to come to the U.S.

The U.S. medical field is inundated with people from the subcontinent and Jews. Which means healthcare is really for the rich and everyone else gets shit care from these "doctors" who are just there to game medicare.

You're a young doctor who can make bank off America's broken healthcare system as well as score some pretty nice pussy with your accent. Plus you will get incredible bonus points for being from an ultra protected minority class on top of that.

You're in the upper tier social status and as long as you're not too neurotic (like many medical professionals) you can make it work.

....like space lol

If I had these credentials and in the position you were in I would fucking sprint and not walk to find out how to immigrate to the U.S.

I'm not being sarcastic at all but it's just true. A black U.K. doctor you should theoretically recieve an incredible status bump compared to where you are now.

Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get a residency spot, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US, but a lot of US doctors dislike the field for a variety of reasons.


2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?

Look at the match rate - the residency program foundation advertises a ~50% match rate for international medical (IMG) graduates who apply to US residency programs. The foundation is saying that 1 in every 2 IMGs who apply will get a residency spot and eventually become a doctor in the US.

But this stat is super misleading to IMGs. Why? Because the foundation excludes all the IMGs who applied to US residency programs but did not get any interviews from the statistic. If you include all the IMGs who apply (including those who got interviews and who didn't get any interviews), the match rate drops to 35%.

If you are in the UK, you can make money as a doctor right now. In the US, you will be spending money on tests and any exam that you don't do well on will make it more likely that you will not be in 65% that will not get a residency spot.

Is it possible to immigrate? Yes.

But it is much harder than you think.
 

El Chinito loco

Crow
Gold Member
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
thedarkknight said:
....like space lol

If I had these credentials and in the position you were in I would fucking sprint and not walk to find out how to immigrate to the U.S.

I'm not being sarcastic at all but it's just true. A black U.K. doctor you should theoretically recieve an incredible status bump compared to where you are now.

Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get a residency spot, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US, but a lot of US doctors dislike the field for a variety of reasons.


2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?

Look at the match rate - the residency program foundation advertises a ~50% match rate for international medical (IMG) graduates who apply to US residency programs. They are saying that 1 in every 2 IMGs who apply will get a residency spot and eventually become a doctor in the US.

But this stat is super misleading to IMGs. Why? Because the foundation excludes all the IMGs who applied to US residency programs but did not get any interviews from the statistic. If you include all the IMGs who apply (including those who got interviews and who didn't get any interviews), the match rate drops to 35%.

If you are in the UK, you can make money as a doctor right now. In the US, you will be spending money on tests and any exam that you don't do well on will make it more likely that you will not be in 65% that will not get a residency spot.

Is it possible to immigrate? Yes.

But it is much harder than you think.

Why are you trying to dissuade him from going to the U.S.?

That's what I want to know.

You're really adamant on that fact and went hostile when I pointed out certain ethnic groups who are prominent in the U.S. medical field.

It's interesting to say the least.
 
thedarkknight said:
Sonoma said:
When was the last time you got laid? Who are your best friends? What do you enjoy doing when you're not at work? When do you expect your work situation to be better?

It sounds like you hate your life, not just your work.

I got laid four weeks ago with an ex gf. I will never see her again as I've moved city. I lost my best friends after I left medical school as they became jealous following my graduation. These guys were from the "hood" and I grew up along them but became bitter. I don't see the situation changing at work TBH. You rise up the ranks but you have different types of stress. My new friends are medics but they don't get laid and are fanatics about medicine and status seeking. They are either asexual or betas with extremely entitled and bossy medic girlfriends.

Can you elaborate on this? Was it the crab mentality? Did they try to sabotage you or shame you for what you do?
 
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
If I had these credentials and in the position you were in I would fucking sprint and not walk to find out how to immigrate to the U.S.

I'm not being sarcastic at all but it's just true. A black U.K. doctor you should theoretically recieve an incredible status bump compared to where you are now.

Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get a residency spot, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US, but a lot of US doctors dislike the field for a variety of reasons.


2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?

Look at the match rate - the residency program foundation advertises a ~50% match rate for international medical (IMG) graduates who apply to US residency programs. They are saying that 1 in every 2 IMGs who apply will get a residency spot and eventually become a doctor in the US.

But this stat is super misleading to IMGs. Why? Because the foundation excludes all the IMGs who applied to US residency programs but did not get any interviews from the statistic. If you include all the IMGs who apply (including those who got interviews and who didn't get any interviews), the match rate drops to 35%.

If you are in the UK, you can make money as a doctor right now. In the US, you will be spending money on tests and any exam that you don't do well on will make it more likely that you will not be in 65% that will not get a residency spot.

Is it possible to immigrate? Yes.

But it is much harder than you think.

Why are you trying to dissuade him from going to the U.S.?

That's what I want to know.

You're really adamant on that fact and went hostile when I pointed out certain ethnic groups who are prominent in the U.S. medical field.

It's interesting to say the least.

You are making it seem like he can pack his bags and work as a doctor in the US. I am telling him that he can come to the US, but that it will require a ton of work to beat out his competition and get a residency spot.

I know that certain ethnic groups are prominent in the medical field. But, I also know that doctors from these groups aren't uniformly scamming Medicare like you initially claimed.
 

El Chinito loco

Crow
Gold Member
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get a residency spot, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US, but a lot of US doctors dislike the field for a variety of reasons.


2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?

Look at the match rate - the residency program foundation advertises a ~50% match rate for international medical (IMG) graduates who apply to US residency programs. They are saying that 1 in every 2 IMGs who apply will get a residency spot and eventually become a doctor in the US.

But this stat is super misleading to IMGs. Why? Because the foundation excludes all the IMGs who applied to US residency programs but did not get any interviews from the statistic. If you include all the IMGs who apply (including those who got interviews and who didn't get any interviews), the match rate drops to 35%.

If you are in the UK, you can make money as a doctor right now. In the US, you will be spending money on tests and any exam that you don't do well on will make it more likely that you will not be in 65% that will not get a residency spot.

Is it possible to immigrate? Yes.

But it is much harder than you think.

Why are you trying to dissuade him from going to the U.S.?

That's what I want to know.

You're really adamant on that fact and went hostile when I pointed out certain ethnic groups who are prominent in the U.S. medical field.

It's interesting to say the least.

You are making it seem like he can pack his bags and work as a doctor in the US. I am telling him that he can come to the US, but that it will require a ton of work to beat out his competition and get a residency spot.

I know that certain ethnic groups are prominent in the medical field. But, I also know that doctors from these groups aren't uniformly scamming Medicare like you initially claimed.

Yes going to a different country requires effort but why are you so adamantly and actively blocking it and from such an emotional point of view?
 

El Chinito loco

Crow
Gold Member
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
Immigrating to the US will be a 1-2 year process - you will have to take 3 exams (should cost around 2-3k in exam fees alone), score decently well on them and then apply to residency programs. If you get a residency spot, you are technically in training to become a doctor and you will make around 50k per year while you are in the residency program.

Medicine is better for doctors in the US, but a lot of US doctors dislike the field for a variety of reasons.


2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?

Look at the match rate - the residency program foundation advertises a ~50% match rate for international medical (IMG) graduates who apply to US residency programs. They are saying that 1 in every 2 IMGs who apply will get a residency spot and eventually become a doctor in the US.

But this stat is super misleading to IMGs. Why? Because the foundation excludes all the IMGs who applied to US residency programs but did not get any interviews from the statistic. If you include all the IMGs who apply (including those who got interviews and who didn't get any interviews), the match rate drops to 35%.

If you are in the UK, you can make money as a doctor right now. In the US, you will be spending money on tests and any exam that you don't do well on will make it more likely that you will not be in 65% that will not get a residency spot.

Is it possible to immigrate? Yes.

But it is much harder than you think.

Why are you trying to dissuade him from going to the U.S.?

That's what I want to know.

You're really adamant on that fact and went hostile when I pointed out certain ethnic groups who are prominent in the U.S. medical field.

It's interesting to say the least.

You are making it seem like he can pack his bags and work as a doctor in the US. I am telling him that he can come to the US, but that it will require a ton of work to beat out his competition and get a residency spot.

I know that certain ethnic groups are prominent in the medical field. But, I also know that doctors from these groups aren't uniformly scamming Medicare like you initially claimed.

Yes going to a different country requires effort but why are you so adamantly and actively blocking it and from such an emotional point of view?


Why so defensive overall about the groups with regards to medicare?
 

Svoboda

Kingfisher
This might be a bit of a stretch but you mentioned you're working a lot (in healthcare) and the topic of your skin color passed. How much do you get outside and catch some sun? The symptoms you describe aren't far from seasonal/winter depression (which can happen any season and last more than a season).

When's the last time you've been on a vacation?
 
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
2-3k is also not much when considering the overall career advancement. You're throwing up a lot of mental roadblocks.

Why are you so protective of this?

Look at the match rate - the residency program foundation advertises a ~50% match rate for international medical (IMG) graduates who apply to US residency programs. They are saying that 1 in every 2 IMGs who apply will get a residency spot and eventually become a doctor in the US.

But this stat is super misleading to IMGs. Why? Because the foundation excludes all the IMGs who applied to US residency programs but did not get any interviews from the statistic. If you include all the IMGs who apply (including those who got interviews and who didn't get any interviews), the match rate drops to 35%.

If you are in the UK, you can make money as a doctor right now. In the US, you will be spending money on tests and any exam that you don't do well on will make it more likely that you will not be in 65% that will not get a residency spot.

Is it possible to immigrate? Yes.

But it is much harder than you think.

Why are you trying to dissuade him from going to the U.S.?

That's what I want to know.

You're really adamant on that fact and went hostile when I pointed out certain ethnic groups who are prominent in the U.S. medical field.

It's interesting to say the least.

You are making it seem like he can pack his bags and work as a doctor in the US. I am telling him that he can come to the US, but that it will require a ton of work to beat out his competition and get a residency spot.

I know that certain ethnic groups are prominent in the medical field. But, I also know that doctors from these groups aren't uniformly scamming Medicare like you initially claimed.

Yes going to a different country requires effort but why are you so adamantly and actively blocking it and from such an emotional point of view?


Why so defensive overall about the groups with regards to medicare?

Giving him a realistic picture of what he will face is not blocking him. If he wants to go to the US badly enough, he can make it there as a doctor.

Why are you so upset that someone decided to call out your garbage racial/religious theories?

Edit: I work in consulting now, but I previously went to a legit med school in the US & have also talked to International Medical Graduates from various countries.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
thedarkknight said:
. These guys were from the "hood" and I grew up along them but became bitter. I don't see the situation changing at work TBH.

I got some advice for you doc.

Go back to the hood, and open up a ghetto doctors office. Help the less fortunate. Put your skills to work for the good of mankind.

Or buy peoples blood. Open up one of those places.

Either way, put your hood skills in sync with your medical skills.

And don't take this the wrong way, but don't complain so much. You are gonna be OK. If I'm bleeding out my ass I want a doctor with a happy face on. If you are so crabby the patients are gonna see it.

Aloha!
 

eradicator

Peacock
Gold Member
If you are bleeding out of your ass Kona, you want a doctor that is sure you don't have colon cancer after running all the tests.

But I get your point.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
eradicator said:
If you are bleeding out of your ass Kona, you want a doctor that is sure you don't have colon cancer after running all the tests.

But I get your point.

I meant it in a "bleeding very much" type of way. No literally ass bleeding.

But I also see your point.

Aloha!
 
3 of my friends are MDs.

One did an MBA later and became a pharma manager - successful and happy in this despite him being top of his class and having stellar records in hospitals.

The other one is a woman and psychiatrist - got babies and took breaks, but will come back on the job - likes her specialization.

The other guy is fine being a doctor on a conventional hospital career path - he fucks every nurse, female doctor in sight - married or unmarried. Off the job - he is busy fucking other women.

You have to find a direction which suits you - also getting laid helps. You are just 26, so no worry.
 
thedarkknight said:
SPOILER ALERT: This post may contain whining

I'm 26 and qualified from medical school two years ago. I then spent two years doing my compulsory junior doctor training in the NHS. I decided not to apply for speciality training this year, so I have one year " off the treadmill." I planned on doing a locum job in cardiology but that fell through two days ago. Now I am doing as and when 13 hr acute medicine shifts for two days/ nights a week.

By the end of the second year, I had become visibly miserable at work. I wasn't lazy and made no major mistakes but nurses would ask me why don't I smile. I did extra shifts because I adopted the mentality of earn money and don't fuck up, which at 26 and two years into a lifelong career is worrying. On the last day of the rotation, a senior spoke to me one on one asking me that many seniors thought I was depressed and that it was obvious I hated me job. I was very quiet but my body language screamed that I would rather do anything than my job. He advised me not to rush in deciding what I want to do. I want to do internal medicine but have had four months of psychiatry followed by four months of general surgery, I haven't dont any internal med since the start of December.

My plan as of right now is,

1)Do occasional acute medicine shifts to brush up skills and earn money
2) Sign up to language courses at my old university
3)Try to get more teaching / papers published from the hospital I worked at over the last two years
4) Taking the first stage of the medicine post grad exam in September
5) have fun and learn game

Have I fucked up and am I in a right mess?

It's just strange that two years ago I was such a go getter . I got four papers published in journals and was hitting it hard. Now....I would count down the hours left at work... daily.

I was thinking where I'd want to go win this medicine business. I don't need tons money and am a low key guy with no desire to climb up the ladder. I was raised from a very humble background and I kinda kept the same kind of mentality despite getting these qualifications. I just want to enjoy and be good at my job. That's it.

TDK

I'm not entirely sure what the big problem is TBH.

1)Are you feeling burnt out? Maybe a break would do you good?
Are you moving between hospitals all the same? Is this affecting your life balance.

2)Are you feeling flat re career? There's plenty of options for you as a doctor, even tho its competitive.
Lots of options outside of the "normal" too.

3)OK learn game, take up hobbies etc. But there's also a vibrant communtiy surrounding hospitals.
Maybe you don't overly like the one you are at. But won't you be at another hospital/rotation pretty soon.

If your colleagues are betas, thats great. It means you don't have much competition for all those slutty nurse bitches! : D

Finally, you shouldn't worry about breaking contact with old friends. I found some of my "old friends" to be a bit shitty/resentful as time post school and college went on. The bad ones, I eventually broke off contact with. My only regret was not doing so sooner.
 

Thomas the Rhymer

Ostrich
Gold Member
The last time I felt like that, it was because there was literally nothing to my life outside of medicine.

Do you do anything outside of medicine? The fact that you published papers while training/studying suggests that you live, breath, sleep medicine. That sort of imbalance will drive a deep drill of meaninglessness into the very depths of your heart.

What's worrying is that you've decided to sign up for a language course. As if more studying will fill up the hole in your life that has been caused by so much studying.
 
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