26 year old doctor ...two years post graduation... lost drive and confidence

speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
speeddemon said:
El Chinito loco said:
The U.S. medical field is inundated with people from the subcontinent and Jews. Which means healthcare is really for the rich and everyone else gets shit care from these "doctors" who are just there to game medicare.

Provide some evidence or GTFO.

Did this trigger you? oh my apologies. I retract everything, m'lord.

No - you are just full of shit - there are people from all backgrounds who game Medicare, and there is nothing to suggest that subcontinental/Jewish doctors do it more or less than anyone else.

El Chinito Loco is absolutely right, at least as far as foreign physicians are concerned. There is plentiful, ironclad data backing this up.

https://www.researchgate.net/public...dicare_fraud_Characteristics_and_consequences

Findings ‐ Physicians convicted of criminal Medicare and/or Medicaid fraud tend to be male (87 percent), older (average age of 58), and international medical graduates (59 percent).

Foreign trained physicians are responsible for 60% of medicare and medicaid fraud despite constituting only 26% of practicing physicians. That is a pretty stunning discrepancy, and since the largest chunk of foreign doctors in the USA hail from the subcontinent the conclusions we can draw about their propensity for bad medicine and outright fraud are pretty inescapable.
 

Sumanguru

Kingfisher
thedarknight,

A) Exercise as much as possible, with a preference towards lifting (but don't ignore cardio and isometric exercise/yoga/Pilates either). The endorphins and sense of accomplishment will put you in a better mental state.

B) Come up with a long term plan. Whatever field you want to do, go all in. I echo El Chinito and suggest you consider coming to America. We have a dearth of doctors, and my anecdotal experience is that they are disproportionately Jewish and from the subcontinent. An experienced, qualified black doctor would be highly in demand, and a black doctor with a British accent would have pussy thrown at him.

C) Get on Meetup.com and meet people with similar interests and strengthen your socialization skills. Meetup is also an OK place to meet chicks, depending on the group.

D) Remember that you're a young, healthy, doctor. Meaning you're already ahead of 90% of the men of your generation. You're in a good place in life. Be grateful, and while you strive to further improve yourself, appreciate all you have.

Good luck.
 
Higgs Bosun said:
El Chinito Loco is absolutely right, at least as far as foreign physicians are concerned. There is plentiful, ironclad data backing this up.

https://www.researchgate.net/public...dicare_fraud_Characteristics_and_consequences

Findings ‐ Physicians convicted of criminal Medicare and/or Medicaid fraud tend to be male (87 percent), older (average age of 58), and international medical graduates (59 percent).

Foreign trained physicians are responsible for 60% of medicare and medicaid fraud despite constituting only 26% of practicing physicians. That is a pretty stunning discrepancy, and since the largest chunk of foreign doctors in the USA hail from the subcontinent the conclusions we can draw about their propensity for bad medicine and outright fraud are pretty inescapable.

1. Your research study has barely been cited over the past ten years (most good research ends up getting cited).

2. International medical graduates (IMGs) in your research study refers to anyone who graduated from a school that isn't located in the US. This includes any US citizen who went to an international medical school & any foreign citizen who went to international medical school (your study makes no distinction between these two groups).

3. According to the link you provided stating 26% of US doctors are international medical graduates (http://jaoa.org/article.aspx?articleid=2213422) :

"The top 5 countries of citizenship of these international medical graduates were the United States (30.8%), India (14.2%), Canada (8.6%), Pakistan (5.5%), and Nigeria (2.2%)."

Subcontinental doctors (India + Pakistan) = 14.2 + 5.5 = 19.7% of all international medical graduates in 2013 (the % fluctuates a bit every year). Not sure why you are blaming them for most of the Medicare fraud, since you have provided nothing to back up that claim.
 
Sumanguru said:
I echo El Chinito and suggest you consider coming to America. We have a dearth of doctors

This is unfortunately by design. The number of seats in US medical schools is capped, and every foreign doctor has to redo their training if they want to practice in the US. There are only a certain number of training positions (aka residencies) available each year.
 

Thersites

Kingfisher
At the heart of the OP, stop focusing medicine as you sole focus in life. Branch out and enjoy yourself. YOu will burning out as time goes if your focus on medicine as sole existence in life.

I would advise not heading to the US to practice medicine. There is lot of trade offs and costs for examinations and certifications to be in medicine. Let me states some of the hurdles you have to go through. First you have to take all 3 steps of the USMLE to be legible in the US. Second, you have to redo your training do to differences in US practice of medicine. Third, you have to go through 3-5 year residency depending on the program of your choice. Fourth, as foreign citizen, you are limited to programs that take J1 visa to be allow to stray in the country. This going to take good 2 years just to get prepare to apply for programs.

As UK train doctor, you have ability to go to Commonwealth countries that are in need of well train doctors. You avoid having to go through all the bullshit being a US doctor as stated above. You can head down the Caribbean med schools and become a tutor or teacher down there as British doctors are one of the few to do physical exam well compare to US. You have options available.
 

Thomas the Rhymer

Ostrich
Gold Member
thedarkknight said:
I'm Poosy deficient.

A very serious problem. One problem among doctors is that we get so engrossed in our work, that we struggle to talk about anything but work.

So we struggle to game and relate to women who are not in medical fields.

So many doctors end up marrying other doctors or nurses or other healthcare workers, which is a nightmare because then you never get away from talking shop; it's like extra homework you have to when you should not be thinking about work. The divorce rate in these match ups is apparently high, because outside of work, the couple never really makes a deeper connection.

Also, Maslow's hierarchy is real. Basic human psychology means that you will not feel job satisfaction unless your 'lower' urges are met first.

I was in that same boat once, a 27 year old virgin who just didn't care about work much anymore. I quit full-time work and worked very hard to try and get laid. It was difficult for me, because I had very poor social intelligence (I still struggle to understand people) and approaching girls was hard work, especially in the beginning. But once I started having regular sex, medicine became a lot more fun, and I could return to my medical career with enthusiasm. Once your base needs are fulfilled, your mind and body will give you permission to enjoy other things.

I think part of the reason that you are resistant to further training in medicine right now is because you know that you will end up studying in most of your free time, and you will work ridiculously long hours, and there will be no time/energy left left to chase chicks. Deep down inside, you know you need to satisfy your basic urges before continuing with career development.

Anyway, I might be projecting my own personality onto you, so I might be wrong with what I said above, but that is what I suspect is really bugging you.
 

McCarthy

Sparrow
Leonard D Neubache said:
Pussy isn't everything, but it sure ain't nothing.

The RVF is a good surrogate brotherhood if you're feeling alone. There are some top notch players here that will have you banging sloots in no time. I assume you're earning decent money so you're already ahead of the beta pack.

In the meanwhile you might want to look sideways for some sort of brotherhood you can start beyond the digital realm. Sometimes it's better to look beyond your own profession for guys to hang out with, but aim for dudes within your own earning bracket. Just go to the sorts of places guys with your income go to. Not that I can give you much advice on that in specific terms (golfing? yacht club?). I find the best brotherhoods are ones where you have a range of different fields represented because your time away from work doesn't inevitably end up being a talkfest about work. Besides, your whacky stories about idiot patients will be far more interesting to guys outside of the medical field. If you can make friends with some of the women (same age as you) that are roughly in your line of work then they probably have brothers educated to a similar level. That could be an 'in'.

In time you can either make investments and retire early or tailor your work to something you take more enjoyment from but honestly, a job is a job and sometimes it's simpler just to find gratitude that you've got $ rolling in.

I love this forum, seriously. I owe this forum so much.
 

xmlenigma

Pelican
Zelcorpion said:
3 of my friends are MDs.

One did an MBA later and became a pharma manager - successful and happy in this despite him being top of his class and having stellar records in hospitals.

The other one is a woman and psychiatrist - got babies and took breaks, but will come back on the job - likes her specialization.

The other guy is fine being a doctor on a conventional hospital career path - he fucks every nurse, female doctor in sight - married or unmarried. Off the job - he is busy fucking other women.

You have to find a direction which suits you - also getting laid helps. You are just 26, so no worry.

This makes perfect sense.. Enjoy current status, Focus on yourself.. Improve other aspects of your life (fitness, hobbies, lifestyle, social life, self worth, game, women etc) given that you have a stable job & income.. Then once you've got a better handle over yourself and are clearer pick a path of where you want to take your career.. not because that path is going to FIX other aspects of your life.. but ENHANCE them.. as going anywhere now with hopes of it BEING BETTER wont work out.. Just burn a lot more time... before you come back to fixing yourself.
 

thedarkknight

Kingfisher
Update.

It's three weeks from the start of my " year off".

I've done the occasional weekend 13 hour shift to earn cash and keep my skills sharp. I start language courses in October and I have a 6 week Haematology job starting on Wednesday.

I've had a few dates but haven't had sex. I'm also lifting regularly. I've also moved back out of my mum's house, as my family have a crab in the bucket mentality and tried to shame me into staying.

Thanks for all advice. I will ensure that Medicine doesn't define who I am or become the only source of my self-esteem.

TDK
 

thedarkknight

Kingfisher
Off The Reservation said:
Going well?

I've entered arguably the most successful period of my life.

I passed the post-graduate internal medicine exam with a pass rate of 30%...comfortably. I just finished a two-month job in a busy central London teaching hospital in hematology and got asked to come back in December for a further three months. I've also been reading and studying Medicine for fun.

I'm playing guitar again and am learning Time Won't Wait by Jamiroquai. My teacher specializes in funk, which I enjoy very much. French is filled with women- 8 girls two guys (including me). Tinder is supplying dates a good number of dates.

The hematology job really opened my eyes. Seeing people in their early 20's having chemotherapy for life-threatening conditions due to the lottery of genetics really does evaporate most of the trivial concerns that occupy a lot of people.

If you're young and healthy better get living, fucking and working to improve to society.

TDK

P.S. Medicine is a very good profession mainly because if you see it as a sort tradesman type deal.... you can improve your skills and pretty much work anywhere. Just see it as a craft and I do not think you can go far wrong.
 

thedarkknight

Kingfisher
UPDATE
Things have gotten worse.

Applied for the internal medicine two year training program to start in August.
Didn't get any of my top 300 choices in the country. Ended up on national reserve despite strong CV and addition experience and references from the London jobs I've done during this year out.

I had already thought about changing career direction but it sure looks like I'll be doing something else with my life in the long time. I'm still earning good money working as a temp staff doctor and will take second stage of three part post graduate physician exam later this month.

It's funny that despite the CV boosting and addtional experience and passing the exam in time for applications, I still end up with nothing. Thats life. Looks like interview skills let me down.

Any thoughts would be appreciated but the plan is:

(1) Ive saved over 16000 pounds since August, so continue to practice as temp doctor to save money
(2) get careers advice and find out more about any further qualifications I can get to maybe switich to finance or pharmaceutical industry


I still feel sick at the thought of doing meaningless projects to "get further in my career."
When I go to hospital I look in the mirror and don't even recognise the person looking back at me.
I'm not upset at all about not being internal medicine, I'm just scared about the future.


Thanks

TDK
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
Doctor, are you saying you applied to 300 medical schools and didn't get onto any?

And this is 300 in one country only, and that's just the top 300 because there are many more?

If that is the case, maybe it is time for a change.

Aloha!
 

thedarkknight

Kingfisher
Kona said:
Doctor, are you saying you applied to 300 medical schools and didn't get onto any?

And this is 300 in one country only, and that's just the top 300 because there are many more?

If that is the case, maybe it is time for a change.

Aloha!

I've done medical school. This is the two year core medical internship that lasts two years. There are over 1000 around the country but I only ranked the 250 I actually want to do. They put me on a reserve list to see if something comes up but i alreayd had the attitude of grind out two years and then take another career break.

I do think it is time for a change. I'm miserable but driven. Despite that drive I get slapped across the face.
 
OP can you go to Canada, do doctor stuff there,, and then maybe use that as a springboard to getting into the US? I know there are a ton of phara/biotech companies in Canada, and it may be really profitable. Just a thought.
 

Cyr

Kingfisher
OP, what do you think it is about your current situation that is making you 'miserable'? What inspired you to choose medicine in the first place? I understand that working very hard is stressful, but you shouldn't feel that working to get ahead in a career is a 'meaningless project'. You are already taking medicine, which is arguably the most meaningful work you can do. There's no need to be so opposed to necessary groundwork for progress, even if it seems mundane or tedious.

Regarding making friends:
If you have any experience playing team sports, particularly rugby, I would join a local team. Its a great way to instantly fall into a social group and make a lot of friends fast.

In your position I would:
1. Consider working for some sort of 'health clinic' rather than in a hospital. I am saying this as a laymen, so take this with a grain of salt, but I have always thought that if I were to study medicine, I'd rather work at an anti-aging clinic or something along those lines. The work is less taxing and arguably more rewarding.
2. Move into biomed. One of my friends did not get into medical school, but studied biomedical sciences instead and is having a great time. You would be well placed to pivot into that industry. I think it is also slightly more relaxed than medicine proper and there are good progression opportunties.

EDIT: Missed the part about 'meaningless projects' on my first read through.
 

thedarkknight

Kingfisher
I'll make this brief

(1) I may just take a reserve internal medicine post. They are doing round 2 later this month and I'll see what I get. It's still internal medicine it may not be where id want to be but I'll ground out the two years.

(2) I have the 2nd of the 3 part post grad physician exam later this month. I'll pass it.

(3) I'm going spend a few months abroad with family to help get away from it a spend time with loved ones.

(4) I'll continue my guitar and language lessons and weight lifting

(5) ill keep working temporary medicine posts to get money up. I'm on cardiology right now so that's a good job

I shouldn't be so negative. Its not great but things are good. I'm entitled to nothing.


Cyr said:
OP, what do you think it is about your current situation that is making you 'miserable'? What inspired you to choose medicine in the first place? I understand that working very hard is stressful, but you shouldn't feel that working to get ahead in a career is a 'meaningless project'. You are already taking medicine, which is arguably the most meaningful work you can do. There's no need to be so opposed to necessary groundwork for progress, even if it seems mundane or tedious.

Regarding making friends:
If you have any experience playing team sports, particularly rugby, I would join a local team. Its a great way to instantly fall into a social group and make a lot of friends fast.

In your position I would:
1. Consider working for some sort of 'health clinic' rather than in a hospital. I am saying this as a laymen, so take this with a grain of salt, but I have always thought that if I were to study medicine, I'd rather work at an anti-aging clinic or something along those lines. The work is less taxing and arguably more rewarding.
2. Move into biomed. One of my friends did not get into medical school, but studied biomedical sciences instead and is having a great time. You would be well placed to pivot into that industry. I think it is also slightly more relaxed than medicine proper and there are good progression opportunties.

EDIT: Missed the part about 'meaningless projects' on my first read through.
 

thedarkknight

Kingfisher
UPDATE

Turns out I got my first choice location and stella jobs in cardiology, respiratory, gastroenterolgoy, haeamatology and oncology. I was on the reserve list and got bumped up due to people declining offers

So the plan is:

(1) Buy a flat. Live there for two years while I complete the training
(2) after the two years, I do an MD and do part time clinical medicine to earn cash at better rate due to completing internal medicine training

Like I said, if all goes to plan. I'll have 13 letters after my name by 31 years of age and I'll be well trained in a useful skill set. Its not ideal but I'm well positioned.They can take the job away but not the training or the money I will and have earned.

TDK
 
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