A Dead Bat in Paraguay

PineTreeFarmer

Pigeon
Woman
What makes memoirs successful with readers is the opportunity to present the experiencing of similar inconveniences of this world, and being able to understand others.
I can't relate with any of the story, honestly. It's very much a reminder of the outside world, and that it does exist, that I don't wanna participate in masks or vaccinations or the trappings of life with others, and how I love feeling safe and at home and being able to walk to the church my great Gramma went to it does remind me, in a very real way of my own sustained absence from the world not being what Christ calls the church to do.

But I am really, really enjoying the read!
I stopped at page 128 because I had my first good belly laugh and decided I didn't want to get too far ahead.

Let us know when you get your book, @Ah_Tibor!
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
I can't relate with any of the story, honestly. It's very much a reminder of the outside world, and that it does exist, that I don't wanna participate in masks or vaccinations or the trappings of life with others, and how I love feeling safe and at home and being able to walk to the church my great Gramma went to it does remind me, in a very real way of my own sustained absence from the world not being what Christ calls the church to do.

I can relate based on past experiences prior to living a life you mention. I too do not want to participate in anything this world has to offer - just God's beauty and the plan He has created for me and my family. Living a biblical life does provide a feeling of safety, purpose, joy, and closeness to our Creator.

You are very lucky to still have a great grandma, and live the life you do as a family. If I could go back I would informally interview them and record their shared stories when visiting.

I miss my grandparents at times, but remind myself it was not meant for them to be here at this time; being subjected (no pun intended) to this plandemic experiment.

Have blessed evening.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
One thing that stood out to me is that the most happiness comes from being with his dad and family, not from travelling in a place where he has no connections.
A lot of the other people he meets are affluent young adults killing time and slumming.

Travel has definitely been touted as an end unto itself. It's interesting how much things have changed over the years. I feel like people have gotten more introverted and socially retarded in a short period of time, so even the "party" type is more interested in social media than actually hanging out with people (no matter how fleeting or superficial those connections are).
 

PineTreeFarmer

Pigeon
Woman
I feel foolish asking if other climates and cultures don't have the culture of girls and women napping in the late morning and afternoon to prepare for being around men or engage in acceptable experiences outside the home? and how that translates across the globe? @rooshv
 

Brother Abdul Majeed

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I feel foolish asking if other climates and cultures don't have the culture of girls and women napping in the late morning and afternoon to prepare for being around men or engage in acceptable experiences outside the home? and how that translates across the globe? @rooshv
My wife and I sometimes go out for an evening walk "caminata nocturna" on the main promenade of our town. We live on a small island in the Panamanian Caribbean, so we do this after the sun goes down and the blazing heat of the day has subsided. She's Panamanian and I'm Canadian. We like to do this a couple of times a week. Sometimes we will dine at her sister's restaurant, sometimes elsewhere. She's a black Latina, so she likes to dress up a little, nothing slutty though, just elegant. We are not spring chickens, I'm 55 and she's 41, so it's age-appropriate. We will meet and greet our friends and peers along the way. It's a very social lifestyle.

She will often have a siesta during the day. I don't, as it's never been in my nature to do so and I have always got things to do during the day. However, whenever I come home and she feels like having a walk that evening, I will see the clothes that my wife has picked out for me to wear that evening laying on the bed. My shoes have been polished too. It's a fine thing, holding your wife's hand as you stroll down the street in your small town and treating her to a nice dinner.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
cautionary tale for mothers raising boys

Slowly making my way through - reflecting on lessons and experiences within each chapter.
Here are some personal observations/ keys findings (so far), and the significance to today's social culture.

  • We live in a fallen world, and there will be temptations and vulgar all around the world we live in today. It is important to be aware of the surroundings, and to be prepared to assess other's behaviours.
  • It is okay to have a cynical attitude towards strangers, especially single women who are not Christians.
  • Satan's influence are harder to avoid when those certain (chosen )opportunities are seeked out - embracing the influences

responding as a critical reader of American Literature

Years from now it would be interesting to read memoirs of today's American youth during this chaotic time- COVID Era.
Today's youth are truly *[a living being sacrificed to a deity or in the performance of a religious rite] of this world.

*victims defined by Webster.

Would this be a woman's reading group only or a mixed group?

@Maddox ?
 

PineTreeFarmer

Pigeon
Woman
Slowly making my way through - reflecting on lessons and experiences within each chapter.
Here are some personal observations/ keys findings (so far), and the significance to today's social culture.

  • We live in a fallen world, and there will be temptations and vulgar all around the world we live in today. It is important to be aware of the surroundings, and to be prepared to assess other's behaviours.
I'm taking notes in the text so that I can just leave it on the shelf for my boys. Some of it is just as simple as textual brackets with ewwww yuck never or noooo in the margins.

The younger boy knows of Roosh because I have listened to him when he streams for the last couple of years, and he appreciates his collection of stuffed lovies. The older boy called me a Stan when he opened the Amazon box with the book.
  • It is okay to have a cynical attitude towards strangers, especially single women who are not Christians.
I am the (single mom of) middle schoolers in a heavily Baptist and Mennonite rural environment. But Christianity is so engrained in the culture that the kids pray together even in public school. I think they would know what kind of girl they were with the first time they sat down to dinner and didn't pray and they expect to be fed!
  • Satan's influence are harder to avoid when those certain (chosen )opportunities are seeked out - embracing the influences
This is absolutely true. I grew up in a metro area and it always felt like my thoughts were not my own and that the constant barrage of information and material culture kept me from properly adhering to the values that should have governed my time. Like there was always some little thing happening that was knitting a future that could've been a much more straight shot.

In the text when Roosh gets to Argentina, I believe, the waitress sends them to the wrong sort of bar for their approach to her behavior. The US has as many distinct cultural approaches and barriers around our use of language, I think, sometimes. And an era of kids who sit in front of YouTube and emulate meme speak? Lord help us the number of times a week I hear someone fall my fluffy cat Chungus.

*He's laughingly telling me just now YouTube deleted a video of a man screaming as he reads the bible, so as to be offensive.
Years from now it would be interesting to read memoirs of today's American youth during this chaotic time- COVID Era.
Today's youth are truly *[a living being sacrificed to a deity or in the performance of a religious rite] of this world.

*victims defined by Webster.


I don't want them to be so removed from the world that they're oblivious to what happens within it, though I don't think they would emulate any of this behavior after reading it. And they're sort of myopic in the sense that they entertain themselves at home without being in a state of constant craving for the company of others.

I have a friend who did studies on social subjugation, where she subjected rats to various spatial experiments and crated the subjects in between. Her answer is always crate 'em. But it feels like there should be more to life than intermittent outings to test your ability to be pleasant and appreciate the world, with only experiences that are part of a separate community or world. There is an essential freedom of movement issue that can't be rectified if you don't want your sons to be dogs, though.

As for American Lit -- it reminds me of The Night of the Iguana, as far as anything in a semi-familiar literary space that I could draw from. I want to read it again to see the characters unfold, and I haven't ever seen the movie.

And there's a passage where Roosh talks about the amount of travel he covers in such a short time and how in the future people would look at printed travel guides as the pinnacle of human culture It tickled me because I would never think to use a book to plan a trip anymore.

Also, I have Fr. Seraphim Rose's Christianity and the Religion of the Future on the shelf that I've read very little of. That might be a better group reading project!
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
Also, I have Fr. Seraphim Rose's Christianity and the Religion of the Future on the shelf that I've read very little of. That might be a better group reading project!

Yass girl lol. I always had a bad concept of Fr. Seraphim growing up because I associated him with weird people.

Recently though I just realized how spot-on he was with everything and I really like his work. I think because of his background he understood American culture in a way a lot of us don't, and he saw what was coming very clearly.
 

PineTreeFarmer

Pigeon
Woman
Yass girl lol. I always had a bad concept of Fr. Seraphim growing up because I associated him with weird people.

Recently though I just realized how spot-on he was with everything and I really like his work. I think because of his background he understood American culture in a way a lot of us don't, and he saw what was coming very clearly.
I read the first two sections and they were lol painfully close to home. Let's!
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
You are all making me intrigued about this book. I’d really first like to read Lady, though, if anyone is interested I’m doing a ‘book club’ with that one in the future.

I’m going to get a lot of flak for this, but I find an interesting parallel on the surface with Anton LaVey’s book for women. I think I’ve stated this before elsewhere, and yes, I have read The Satanic Witch. I like to see how the ‘other side’ thinks because there is nothing like being informed and more knowledgeable in order to counteract any point with some leverage. And honestly, from what I recall, much of the book is about personal grooming and making oneself pleasant to men, rather than being about how most people think of Satan or dark magic.

It was many years ago when I read the LaVey book, and at that time it was also many years after it was first published. I was mostly curious about a book for women written by a man. I still have this curiosity today about Lady. Where better to find out how men think of and value women. I have a friend in mind to pass it along to once I actually buy and finish Lady, and I think she will find great value in it.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Enjoying this memoir slowly, and looking forward to sharing more when time permits.
A lot of laughing, a lot of remimencing, and a lot of thinking.

Since leaving my 8:00 am to 5:00 pm desk job, to raise and to homeschool, I now have less time to contribute to this forum and to research endless information on the Internet. Being a homeschooling mom and housewife is more rewarding than I ever imagined!

This book was published in 2009, and Bang was in 2007. So I am assuming this story happened prior to 2007?
 

PineTreeFarmer

Pigeon
Woman
Enjoying this memoir slowly, and looking forward to sharing more when time permits.
A lot of laughing, a lot of remimencing, and a lot of thinking.

Since leaving my 8:00 am to 5:00 pm desk job, to raise and to homeschool, I now have less time to contribute to this forum and to research endless information on the Internet. Being a homeschooling mom and housewife is more rewarding than I ever imagined!

This book was published in 2009, and Bang was in 2007. So I am assuming this story happened prior to 2007?
That sounds really rewarding <3 how long have you been homeschooling? We live in a place where there is precisely one school for the whole county, my boys love going, and tbqh their knowledge of math is going to surpass mine soon. It gets a little tedious being at home without them. Engineering brains from all sides-- both grandfathers and all four great grandfathers.
I got to the last few sections of the book and needed a break. I got as far as praising American women for being easy. The beginning seems fresh, but toward the end he just seems myopic about sleeping with women. In the beginning he had to acclimate himself to another part of the world and watching over himself and interact with fellow travellers, and I found that part much more endearing. Can't wait to hear what you have to say!
 
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messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
I got to the last few sections of the book and needed a break. I got as far as praising American women for being easy. The beginning seems fresh, but toward the end he just seems myopic about sleeping with women. In the beginning he had to acclimate himself to another part of the world and watching over himself and interact with fellow travellers, and I found that part much more endearing. Can't wait to hear what you have to say!

Heading out of Uruguay & Paraguay soon into Rio Janeiro.

I have to say there are a lot of uncanny similaires in life, and chosen behaviours.
Do our behaviours contribute to [injuries arising from particular circumstances]. Yes.

The descriptive writing of surroundings and personalities presents a type of realm the story will take place.
The first two individuals met early in the story, Ecuador, seemed to be polar opposites - helpful Beligan man on transportation verses a Colombian man at the bar setting up temptation.

Ecuador seemed to have lust everywhere, but what I remembered most from the beginning of the story was the feeling of descending into the realm of sin:

Two prostitutes greeted me in thickly accented English. Then a junkie crossed the street and tugged at my arm, obviously high on something. I yanked back my arm from his grip and he put his hands together as if pleading for a donation, but I kept going. My heart raced while I waited to be buzzed into the hostel.

The disappointing experiences he finds himself in are due to the circumstances. The circumstances are a result of the decisions (and priorities) made during certain times in his trip - personal life. As a reader I was hoping he, as the main character, would wake up to see what he was really missing while traveling, and not the continued secular pursuits. However, throughout the story the missing of home and family references show good character.

Trigger warning: book is vulgar

There are parts of the story that are vulgar; however the vulgar is needed to provide a honest depiction of the experience - behaviour specifically. The vulgar language depicts behaviour that is [lacking sophistication or good taste], and that is shameful in moral standards.

Although the story is vulgar, it is not offensive.
As a woman I can still enjoy reading this story, and relating to the generational experiences; as well as, some travel experiences.

The younger boy knows of Roosh because I have listened to him when he streams for the last couple of years, and he appreciates his collection of stuffed lovies. The older boy called me a Stan when he opened the Amazon box with the book.

I must be old (or out of loop)- I had to look up what Stan meant. Then I laughed, perhaps not a Stan, but Stanly (adverb - ly) behaviour only.
Thank you.

And they're sort of myopic in the sense that they entertain themselves at home without being in a state of constant craving for the company of others.

A blessing for you and your family. Home is a small part of what heaven has to offer.

I don't want them to be so removed from the world that they're oblivious to what happens within it, though I don't think they would emulate any of this behavior after reading it.

The story helps to tell a lesson I would suppose. And for some it may serve as a reminder: where we were during those years.
But what makes this story significant for a Christian is it happens to be a part of a testimony that continues in his latest memoir.
 

PVW

Sparrow
Woman
I feel foolish asking if other climates and cultures don't have the culture of girls and women napping in the late morning and afternoon to prepare for being around men or engage in acceptable experiences outside the home? and how that translates across the globe? @rooshv
Is it a cultural thing or just a personal thing? If a woman is at home all the time staying busy, it's likely she might need a nap at some point during the day, especially if she is taking care of children.
 

PVW

Sparrow
Woman
Found it. I remember when I was studying languages in school, we also learned about other cultures. The siesta was something we talked about, and where it is valued. But it's not just about women and girls napping in the afternoon. It's for everyone:


A siesta (from Spanish, pronounced [ˈsjesta] and meaning "nap") is a short nap taken in the early afternoon, often after the midday meal. Such a period of sleep is a common tradition in some countries, particularly those where the weather is warm.

Siestas are historically common throughout the Mediterranean and Southern Europe, The Middle East, Mainland China, and the Indian subcontinent. The siesta is a tradition in Spain and, through Spanish influence, most of Latin America. In Dalmatia (coastal Croatia), the traditional afternoon nap is known as pižolot (from Venetian pixolotto).[1] The Spanish word siesta derives originally from the Latin word hora sexta "sixth hour" (counting from dawn, hence "midday rest"). In Egypt the mid-afternoon nap is called "taaseela". In Egypt as with other Middle Eastern countries, government workers typically work 6 hours a day, 6 days a week. Due to this schedule, workers don't eat lunch at work, but instead leave work around 2pm and eat their main meal which is the heaviest at lunch time. Following the heavy lunch, they take a taaseela or nap and have tea upon waking up. For dinner, they usually have a smaller meal.

Factors explaining the geographical distribution of the modern siesta are warm temperatures and heavy intake of food at the midday meal. Combined, these two factors contribute to the feeling of post-lunch drowsiness. In many countries that practice the siesta, the summer heat can be unbearable in the early afternoon, making a midday break at home welcome.

But it might be less common now in the modern period.
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
I'm taking notes in the text so that I can just leave it on the shelf for my boys.

I wrote notes too, and will leave it on the shelf. Two of the greatest aspects of having a book in hand to read.

As a woman I can still enjoy reading this story, and relating to the generational experiences; as well as, some travel experiences.

Once I went to a third world country, in Central America, for a few weeks to assist with medical and educational projects. We stayed at villas next to our work area in a rural location. The food we ate was slaughtered that morning from the fields and everything was authentic and grown on site. Before leaving we were all prescribed medicine in case of intestinal parasites . Never once was ill during and returning home from the rural area.

About seven months later I traveled to Mexico and stayed in a [Five Star] all-inclusive resort as a vacation. Upon my return home I needed to take extra time off from work due to an intestinal parasite issue. The seven month old prescription came in handy.

Looking back the gift given from the Mexico trip was an opportunity to transition out of a toxic relationship/lifestyle and onto a new path to salvation. Praise God!
 

messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Finished the story, and found the memoir to be just as entertaining and humorous as other secular memoirs read in the past.
Content, tone, and language are used appropriately within the context of the character's lifestyle and travel purposes.

Found it interesting throughout the story the number of secular references about spiritual content (God, praying, demons) . Also within the story there are shared moments of consideration for how other individuals were living in a state of poverty - attention (although he admitted to suppressing those thoughts) it showed decency for others; where most individuals are blinded.

Few individuals are able to identify, but Roosh did:

It seems like as soon as I get what I want, I adjust to it quickly and then begin to ache for somethings else, convinced that that something else will solve the problem. The cycle keeps repeating and my life has become about chasing this ideal of happiness or contentment, when the ability to be happy or content is either inside me or not. If I can't find happiness in my own backyard, with my friends and family, my own culture and language , my comfortable routine, and most importantly my health, then I don't know how I'll find it somewhere else. There is no exception: nature. (Rio Janeiro pg. 249)

And reiterated again in his most recent memoir, American Pilgrim:

No matter what I had achieved, and how great in stature I saw myself, I never escaped being a young man out of college who
felt inadequate, inferior, and engorged with lust. All my accomplishments could provide only temporary happiness until I was mentally right back where I started. I wanted to feel complete and whole yet I felt empty and alone. I began to see my lifestyle as a dead end, but I didn’t know where else to turn. If extracting and gaining from the world wasn’t the answer, what was?

The question to be asked is: Was choosing God a way to break a repeating cycle of chasing the ideal of happiness/contentment?
Personally I felt the section on Argentina (pages 187 and page 192) brought the story to the purpose with a little foreshadow.
 
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