America Is A Dumping Ground For Junk

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
I buy most of my clothes second-hand. I'm wearing a silk/cashmere sweater today that I bought for $1 from my favorite thrift store.

I recommend thrifting, dumpster diving/curb shopping, even just sort of letting it be known among the older generation you accept hand-me-downs and all kinds of stuff will come your way. My husband just picked up a good quality bookcase and table/chairs from his office because they are turning one of the floors into an apartment.

I love watching dumpster diving vids on youtube but I don't do much of that anymore. I would donate stuff that I couldn't use. The "Things I Find in the Garbage" blog is awesome, the guy literally finds gold all the time bc people throw away jewelry boxes and don't go through it.


You can definitely notice the decline in the quality of goods here. My mom said when she was a kid, there was cheap (which was bad but sometimes necessary) or quality (which was expensive but lasted forever), but now everything is made poorly and is midpriced.
 
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TexasJenn

Woodpecker
Woman
^ Good point. My mom has given me some of her clothes from decades ago that are still in near perfect condition after she and I have worn them many, many times. They really don't make 'em like they used to.

In college, my broke friends and I would go dumpster diving on the west side of campus, after the rich kids moved out. It was insane the stuff they'd throw out, practically new furniture, dishes, home furnishings, all kinds of stuff.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
^ Good point. My mom has given me some of her clothes from decades ago that are still in near perfect condition after she and I have worn them many, many times. They really don't make 'em like they used to.

In college, my broke friends and I would go dumpster diving on the west side of campus, after the rich kids moved out. It was insane the stuff they'd throw out, practically new furniture, dishes, home furnishings, all kinds of stuff.

Yeah it's fun. We don't have much room right now so it takes a lot of willpower to ignore things (we were taking a walk before and my husband was just like DON'T EVEN LOOK AT IT because there were giant piles of move-out/spring cleaning on the curb).

There's always been a market for cheap goods in the US though. My sister-in-law's grandma worked in a coat factory where they did a faster job to sell to "bargain" stores (this was in the 40s/50s). They pull the same kind of crap with shipping stuff from China to Italy now.
 

Pendleton

Pelican
I found that after I started boycotting "American" companies for political reasons the quality of almost everything I bought improved significantly. I generally have to pay more and it requires more searching to find the items I want but on balance I am definitely getting for more value for my money.
 

PiousJ

Pigeon
Orthodox
It is important to note that "made in China" is not necessarily a sign of bad quality, and "made in (random European country)" is not an automatic seal of quality.

I have Apple products, electronics, clothing, and so on that has lasted me for years. You just have to look.
 

Grow Bag

Kingfisher
I, too, have noticed how the quality of many of today’s products has really gone down. I use to wear Levi’s and Lee jeans years ago when they were sized correctly.
I used to buy Wrangler jeans, which decades ago used to be cheaper than Levis and anyway as a Nazi I couldn't be seen in Levis;) (just kidding). In the UK trends are pushed and readily adopted and didn't like the new styles. The worst of them being the waist band dropping midway around the arse, which made you want to keep tugging at the waistband to pull them up (thanks a lot Tyronne). The problem with all jeans is that they are the material is not hard wearing and they tend to go at the knees. So now I buy cargo style trousers for everyday casual wear, because they last years.
 

Grow Bag

Kingfisher
I buy most of my clothes second-hand. I'm wearing a silk/cashmere sweater today that I bought for $1 from my favorite thrift store.

I recommend thrifting, dumpster diving/curb shopping, even just sort of letting it be known among the older generation you accept hand-me-downs and all kinds of stuff will come your way. My husband just picked up a good quality bookcase and table/chairs from his office because they are turning one of the floors into an apartment.

I love watching dumpster diving vids on youtube but I don't do much of that anymore. I would donate stuff that I couldn't use. The "Things I Find in the Garbage" blog is awesome, the guy literally finds gold all the time bc people throw away jewelry boxes and don't go through it.

You can definitely notice the decline in the quality of goods here. My mom said when she was a kid, there was cheap (which was bad but sometimes necessary) or quality (which was expensive but lasted forever), but now everything is made poorly and is midpriced.
A woman after my own heart. It's strange, but growing up wearing my older brother's hand-me-downs, you'd think I'd be sensitive to wearing second-hand clothes. Actually it's my older brother who's the clothes snob and has spent many thousands on clothes over the years.

Me, I love finding bargains and things for free. Most of food shopping is done with a trained eye for the price reduced items. I also pick up road kill pheasant when I see them, even got a dead duck one time. I save around 30-40% on my food bills this way. But my greatest joy is browsing thrift stores for books and quality items or looking for thrown out stuff that I can put to good use. If I can make something rather than buy it, I will. Presently I'm collecting timber to make a bedstead. Outside I've got a stack of pallets that will end up as greenhouse shelving and a compost bin. In a throwaway culture the pickings are rich, but I reckon that time is coming to an end.
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
There's an enormous gap in wealth when it comes to the consumption of quality goods. The wealthiest Americans live in houses made from Mahogany wood, imported Italian marble, with German Miele appliances, and French porcelain tableware. Their closets are filled with imported clothing that lasts a lifetime, and their fridges are stocked with high-quality food. As for the carnivores, they'll have a good ol' American barby hanging out in the backyard.

Now... your average, run-of-the-mill, "first of the month paycheck" American tends not to appreciate these things to the same degree. There are exceptions, but they are rare. The average consoomer will simply search a product on ((google)), which returns ((amazon)) listings as the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd results, and will buy whichever product has the highest "rating" from their fellow consoomers. Very seldom is there any regard to the country of manufacture or the expected lifetime of the product. I find boomers and women (and especially boomer women) to follow this pattern to a T. I've personally witnessed my parents vow to shop exclusively from Amazon, simply to save a few pennies on a Chinese toaster and to have it dropped on their doorstep two days later. Absent is any regard to the quality of the product or the fact that they're inadvertently putting the local appliance store out of business. The path of least resistance, I suppose.

From a macro lens, Americans in general don't seem to care that much about quality. Just look at the women guys tend to choose. In selecting a product, it's typically more important that they can have it now, that it's cheap, and that it functions in the near-term. Anything beyond that seems to be a "I'll cross that bridge when I get there", which translates to: "I'll just buy another cheap shitty Chinese toaster off Amazon when the first one breaks." The phenomenon of eschewing quality for price extends to newly constructed houses, public infrastructure projects, telecommunications networks, and any other industry where cutting corners is profitable and viewed as socially acceptable. These values have seeped their way into the general American culture, with little sign of reversal.

Bottom line: Be a wealthy American or move to Europe if you seek higher quality goods.
 
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There's an enormous gap in wealth when it comes to the consumption of quality goods. The wealthiest Americans live in houses made from Mahogany wood, imported Italian marble, with German Miele appliances, and French porcelain tableware. Their closets are filled with imported clothing that lasts a lifetime, and their fridges are stocked with high-quality food. As for the carnivores, they'll have a good ol' American barby hanging out in the backyard.

Now... your average, run-of-the-mill, "first of the month paycheck" American tends not to appreciate these things to the same degree. There are exceptions, but they are rare. The average consoomer will simply search a product on ((google)), which returns ((amazon)) listings as the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd results, and will buy whichever product has the highest "rating" from their fellow consoomers. Very seldom is there any regard to the country of manufacture or the expected lifetime of the product. I find boomers and women (and especially boomer women) to follow this pattern to a T. I've personally witnessed my parents vow to shop exclusively from Amazon, simply to save a few pennies on a Chinese toaster and to have it dropped on their doorstep two days later. Absent is any regard to the quality of the product or the fact that they're inadvertently putting the local appliance store out of business. The path of least resistance, I suppose.

From a macro lens, Americans in general don't seem to care that much about quality. Just look at the women guys tend to choose. In selecting a product, it's typically more important that they can have it now, that it's cheap, and that it functions in the near-term. Anything beyond that seems to be a "I'll cross that bridge when I get there", which translates to: "I'll just buy another cheap shitty Chinese toaster off Amazon when the first one breaks." The phenomenon of eschewing quality for price extends to newly constructed houses, public infrastructure projects, telecommunications networks, and any other industry where cutting corners is profitable and viewed as socially acceptable. These values have seeped their way into the general American culture, with little sign of reversal.

Bottom line: Be a wealthy American or move to Europe if you seek higher quality goods.
Miele appliances are amazing quality, especially things like their vacuums. Quiet and Durable.

German Business practices are also great, these large companies prioritize being family-run and not concerning themselves with "endless growth" and do not go into debt to grow rapidly. They rather take the long-term approach and built their businesses slowly over time, doing things the right way.
 
Originally posted on RooshV.com

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In the past two decades, the quality of products I purchase online or in retail stores has greatly declined. Most of what I buy today are not even finished products—they require a bit of tinkering or modification to perform as advertised, regardless of how many “five star” reviews they’ve garnered. I’m coming to the realization that corporations see us as fools who will buy anything, and will keep unloading junk onto us because we’ll keep buying it.

A friend told me a curious fact. Weber barbecue grills that are sold in America are made in China, while the Weber grills sold in Germany are made in the United States. Why wouldn’t American-made grills be sold to Americans instead of being shipped halfway across the world? “Because Americans prefer cheaper prices over quality, so they buy the inferior grills made in China. Germans do not tolerate inferior quality, so they get the better-made grills that are produced here.”

Could it be that Americans prefer junk over quality? It’s not like we’re an impoverished country (not yet, anyway) whose citizens can’t afford to spend $10 more on a grill that lasts twice as long, if not forever. I can’t help but recall my most recent purchases and how they’re faring.

—I bought a bed frame and mattress from Ikea. Within a day, I noticed a loud creak whenever I moved. I looked on YouTube and—judging by the view counts—thousands of other people had the same problem. After trying a few remedies, the only one that worked was coating the inside of the frame with duct tape to minimize friction with key contact points.

—When I lived in Europe, I don’t remember ever having to replace a pillow, but in America, pillows quickly turn into flat rocks. It’s like they have a self-destruct mechanism built right in. Pillow manufacturers are obliterating the lifespan of a pillow by saving a few cents using inferior polyester filling.

—I bought a screwdriver set from Amazon that came with a dozen bits. On the very first time I used it to tighten a screw, one of the bits started stripping.

—My mom told me she needed a knife set, so I bought her one at a department store. I made sure not to buy the cheapest set because I wanted them to last my mother for the remainder of her life. It didn’t even last a year. The handles all became loose, and one of them detached completely from the blade.

—I bought a three-pack of Type C USB cables from Amazon with “heavy duty” coating. In three years, all of the cables have failed. I fondly remember how USB cables would last forever, and grew up not knowing that it was even possible for them to fail.



—During my long USA road trip, the weather was getting cool so I bought a pair of gloves from Walmart. There was a stiff tag on the inside that was stabbing my skin and turning it red. I had to use my Swiss Army Knife to surgically remove the tag, which was aggressively sewed into the fabric.

—One Asus laptop I bought was not completely level when placed flat on a desk. I fixed it through the use of velcro pads. Another laptop I bought had protruding keys that left marks on the screen. If a laptop unit is defective in any way, I’m guessing that they dump it to the Americans.

—I use a soft lighting box for my live streams. The light bulbs are meant to last for hundreds of hours, but one burned out after I used it for less than fifty.

—A fan I bought from Target made a clicking sound so loud that it disturbed my sleep. I had to stuff folded paper into the mechanism to silence it.

—When buying t-shirts from a store like H&M, I learned that they are all different even if they’re the same size. I must now try on multiple shirts of the exact same cut and size to find one that is not defective. This is difficult in the post-coronavirus world where you may not be able to try on clothing.

I could go on. Almost everything I buy is junk. One of the few items I have bought that is not junk is a Japanese-made hand coffee grinder. I’ve been using it for years and besides the fault of a slightly bent steel notch (from all the grinding), it works perfectly. In fact, when I think of my possessions that have lasted, the only real winner is my 1999 Toyota 4Runner, which was also made in Japan. Even my fancy Samsung Galaxy S9, a premium phone (made in China), has started to have camera focusing problems, and I’ve only had it for two years. In essence, all my possessions are junk. I own a little junkyard. I’m like Redd Foxx in the old television show Sandford and Son. Maybe I can combine my possessions with yours so we can have an even bigger junkyard.

I don’t know how to even begin solving this problem. Do I simply buy the most expensively priced item of whatever I’m looking for, only to find out that I’m still buying junk albeit with a fancier brand name? Or do I seek out craftsmen who are making items by hand? Or maybe I can buy the wires and plastics to make a USB cable myself. Until I create my own workshop, whenever I need something I go to Amazon, Target, or Walmart, and willingly and knowingly buy a piece of junk that I know will not last. It’s not a good feeling.

I want to punish those who are selling me junk by not buying their products, but the economy is so centralized around only a handful of producers that that would be impossible. If I need a fan, there are only a couple of options, and they’re probably all made by Kung Pao Trading Company. When globalization was sold to us as “cheaper prices,” they concealed the downside of inferior products. It’s no surprise that a people who tolerate junk are also seeing their country’s politics and culture turn into junk. I wonder if it’s all related.

Read Next: The Goal Of Corporations Is Not To Make Money
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Get your mom some CUTCO knives!
I was a sales representative many years ago, I’ve had mine for 14 years!

Also, I feel the same way about buying stuff, so I go out of my way to make sure I buy American made products as much as possible; I have found many good companies and I am happy to support them!

Here is a link I found recently that anyone can use:

God Bless
 

PiousJ

Pigeon
Orthodox
Get your mom some CUTCO knives!
I was a sales representative many years ago, I’ve had mine for 14 years!
haha I remember that company. They heavily recruited college kids on campus to sell their stuff. Unfortunately it's a pyramid scheme and their knives are average, at best. They cannot compete with German and Japanese cutlery.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
haha I remember that company. They heavily recruited college kids on campus to sell their stuff. Unfortunately it's a pyramid scheme and their knives are average, at best. They cannot compete with German and Japanese cutlery.

I have a Wustof chef knife I really like. I also have a Farberware one that I've used for years (and bought for $1 at a yard sale). If you have a wet stone and steel it will help immensely.
 

Troller

Pelican
"In essence, all my possessions are junk. I own a little junkyard. I’m like Redd Foxx in the old television show Sandford and Son. Maybe I can combine my possessions with yours so we can have an even bigger junkyard."
This cracked me up. I have a ton of solar garden lights to trade for junk.

I think best knifes are japanese. I would search there.

Zegna is good. Carharrt jeans are really good. Sebago shoes are ok. Boss is shit. Façonnable used to be ok. But they offshored to China so F. them. only went to Façonnable in private sales. They would put a blue dot over shelves with discount. Normal people wouldn´t know it and buy it without discount. Incredible.
Family member gets us designer clothes for 10% of the retail price. Sometimes less. It´s related to aviation. Only workers of X company can buy there. More and less like Nestle workers have a indoor store with discounts. Problem is I can´t try the clothes before buying. So it´s a gamble. I could try it from normal store before and sent the info. But never do it. My birthdays I know I will get sweathshirts clothing two size bigger from entire family.

Kids we buy ralph Lauren and brands like that from outlets. Or sales. They trash everything. Even though some clothes from the first one still fits the second.

Furniture we buy from international auctions. Local auctions. Or second hand sites. Big warehouses of second hand furniture some time has furniture from wealthy families (I think owners of this warehouses have established clients who get the best. Something to work in the future). Ikea is a no go. Except for organizing. Wife likes small Ikea stuff for organizing things. She liked one sofa from there though. I hate Ikea. It feels communism. Whenever my wife wants to go there. I try to go when it´s about to close. She doesn´t realize we always get there 20 minutes before the store closes. I tell her to go with her mother. Everybody using the same. Communism. 2nd hand furniture is cheaper and better. Don´t buy IKEA.

An european auction house:


I would like to buy a barn find car from here and restore it for my kids. Like when the first gets license. And until then we fix it. In the farm we have space.

Check online or personal auctions in your region. Buy furniture from there. Don´t buy new furniture.

Wood has to be heavy. Light furniture is worthless. Real furniture weighs a ton.

Appliance we try to get from Miele outlet if they have available. If not we buy it from store. Bought that smeg washing machine new age shit one time because of my wife. It´s worthless. I think Bosch is also ok.

Cars quality ended after 2000. It´s all stupid gizmos nobody uses to impress newly rich. Japanese are ok. I think Mercedes and BMW still have some good cars. It´s not so much the brand but the model. You need to get the right model. If you buy entrance models it lasts 150k kms.
I bought a second hand Mercedes with low mileage. Would buy it first hand for retail price if it was available. Without any update. Already had supercars. I´m married with 2 kids. After a while. They get tiring. Cost of gas, maintenance, insurance. Noise while driving. Just getting inside. Maybe a classic. I send pictures of the Mercedes to my friends. And it´s like that movie the fat cow believes she´s thin. I tapped the car noise. A friend asked if it was a damaged boat motor. aahahaahah

Want to buy a french Mehari just for beach. I wanted to buy a 80´s Mercedes but my wife talk me out of it. Took her to the car stand which was a mistake. The 2000´s Mercedes is perfect. I honestly thought about buying another one the same model to have two available. She drove a BMW SUV now a Miniclubman. Mini is shit. But she likes it. It´s smaller. Don´t think I can convince her to buy a 80´s BMW/Mercedes. Loolll.

When I was ubering to the stand. The guy drove a recent Audi and was telling me how he changed the brakes of his own car. But to do that. He had to buy a mini computer. To open the brakes. He was all happy telling me about it. A computer to change the brakes???

It´s not only money when car break. It´s the time wasted. Going to the shop. Headache. Knowing you are being ripped off.

Had a Iphone 6. Perfect. Made by Jobs. It stopped updating Whatsapp had to buy an iphone X. Worthless sodomite shit made by faggot Cook.

Charging cables for PS4 remote is a pair every month for kids. Chinese junk.

Buy old stuff. New is worthless. And with all this quotas it will get even worse. The world will become a giant chinese bazaar. Worthless cheap crap. Also there´s too much sizes and types of everything. Imagine a restaurant selling italian chinese french, japanese food. Stupid chinese shit. Even now for electricity. The guy wanted to put a high end electricy switch light. But I don´t want. I want the traditional. The high end changes models each year. If something breaks. How will you get the same model?

If the west falls. It will be a clusterf. Jesuits, jews, chinese and masons. Cancers. I feel for my future grandsons.
 
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Even with good brands/products there’s no guarantee the quality will persist, despite the best intentions, if their subcontractors and suppliers cheap out it’s over. If you find something you like and will need again (clothing, shoes, tool, small appliance, etc.) buy more and store it, a year or two later the “same” item may be produced in a different country or even deeper in China, reviews are replete with “this isn’t like the one I bought before” stories.

I suggest eBay to track down some of these vintage or NOS (new old stock) products, you can set alerts for when new listings are posted. I like Next Door, it’s the best local app I’ve found with a good “for sale & free” section. No one has unlimited space so it’s a good way of selling or getting rid of things (especially bulkier items it’s not worth shipping or paying to dump) so you have some space for quality items. I’ve discovered some cool products this way too, bought a pair of US-made Pendleton shirts for $70. It’s a rarity but I managed to buy four pieces of high-end McIntosh audio equipment for $500 total. I’m not an audiophile so I will sell these for roughly $1000 each.

Networking with people that have similar hobbies and tastes in quality products is important too. If someone knows and likes you they’re far more likely to sell or even give you something of value than someone who’d be willing to pay much more. If you’re really after something that you can’t find you can post ISO (in search of) posts on Next Door, Craigslist or whatever app is best in your area. Yes quality has taken a nosedive but we’ve also never had the ability to search for and find things worldwide. I’m a bibliophile and regularly buy books from international sellers, New Zealand most recently. I always try to reach them directly through their own stores so they aren’t charged a commission and make reasonable offers below their list prices.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
Get your mom some CUTCO knives!
I was a sales representative many years ago, I’ve had mine for 14 years!

Ooh, a chance to nerd out about knives. :nerd

CUTCO knives are not BAD, per se. But they are gimmicky, and the business model is dependent upon the fact that the serrated blades (which most of them are) have a proprietary tooth structure that has to be sharpened on a proprietary machine - or else carefully hand-filed by someone who has the patience and skill to match the angles. But IIRC having them sharpened by anyone other than a CUTCO rep voids the warranty, which is lame and an automatic disqualification for me on principle (avoid anything you can't service/maintain yourself, I say; exceptions should be exceptional and rare). I don't like the handles on them, either. The quality/hardness of the steel is OK, meaning they don't dull too quickly, but most of the "longevity" in terms of sharpness comes from the fact that they're serrated blades. CUTCO's straight-edged blades dull quickly just like any other.

Serrated blades don't dull the same way straight blades do in the first place. I have one long serrated knife, used heavily/daily since 2006. Never sharpened. I actually recently found a BRAND NEW ONE, exact same knife, at a thrift store, bought it and took it home to compare. My old knife is visibly worn down by comparison, but the difference in function is surprisingly small, for anything I'd normally use it for: bread, tomatoes, roasts, etc.

Good knives can be found in virtually any price range, from nearly all manufacturers. My favorite knives are the serrated slicer I mentioned above, and a matching Santoku knife. They were less than $20 each, new (Farberware). They have everything I look for in a knife:

- full tang blade
- scales (handle) attached with metal pins driven through (instead of epoxy/glue, etc.)
- comfortable to grip and manipulate, gets good leverage
- quality STAINLESS steel appropriately treated and tempered (high-carbon-steel is trendy but high-maintenance, rusts easily)
- no aluminum anywhere on it

But I still can't say that Farberware is a decisively good brand, because I've used too many of their knives that were crap - not good construction, or improperly treated steel that doesn't form or hold an edge well.

Wusthof has a good reputation, but their newer knives are hit-or-miss for the same reasons. My husband is in the knife-sharpening business, and he corroborated that about half of them that come through the shop are too soft (poor quality control in tempering/heat-treating). The other half, on the other hand, are excellent knives.

I echo the advice of the folks suggesting Vintage- and Thrift-Store shopping. I recommend that for a LOT of things, but especially knives and other tools. Nearly anything made from metal, I'm more inclined to buy old than new. Usually thrift stores will have MAYBE one or two good knives mixed with a bunch of crap, but at least if you oops and get a crappy thrift store knife, you're usually only out a couple bucks at most.
 

SouthernTory

Woodpecker
Miele appliances are amazing quality, especially things like their vacuums. Quiet and Durable.

German Business practices are also great, these large companies prioritize being family-run and not concerning themselves with "endless growth" and do not go into debt to grow rapidly. They rather take the long-term approach and built their businesses slowly over time, doing things the right way.
They are indeed I have a Miele vac and it was handed down by my parents. From the late 80s but still works perfectly. Says made in Austria on a label where the dust bag goes
 
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