American Chicken is an Unhealthy Food

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
I received several private messages asking for details on a comment I made about chickens and it was suggested I share publicly so I am re-posting here.

I inspected a chicken farm for a job. The farmer drove me around it and at the very end we got to the chicken coop where they keep all the birds. He said you can go inside and look but I'm not going in there--I won't be able to breathe right for 2 days if I go inside. Something about dander and debris.

domestic-fowl-such-as-chickens-turkeys-ducks-and-geese-5.jpg

This factory produces chickens.

I opened the door and it was pitch black--actually after a few seconds I noticed some dim 10 watt light bulbs up in the ceiling every 10 feet or so. I took a flash photo with my camera and returned to the farmer. I asked him about the darkness and he said they keep the room dark so the chicks always think it is night so they never walk around and develop a skeleton--when it comes to processing they have rubbery bones and the meat can just be squeezed right off like a tube of toothpaste. He also said taking my flash photo probably gave a few of them a heart attack since they never see light.



Then there was this box that looked like a library book return. That was for the dead carcasses. I can't remember the number but I believe they found 3 or 4 dead chickens every morning. They are scooped up and placed in that box, and then someone buys them for fertilizer. The number of deaths was pretty shocking, but it didn't matter to the farmer because of the next point:


The chickens you are eating are 6 WEEKS old.

2388140_original.jpg

80% breast meat, 20% chicken

The normal lifespan of a chicken is several years. But these farmers are raising these chickens to have enormous breasts -- so big in fact that they cannot walk well -- and grow to full size in 6 weeks. How do they do this? Well in the old days our grandfather would go to the feed store and buy chicken feed. These days, if you are a chicken farmer, you either work for McCormack or Tyson, and their contract specifies that they deliver a mystery food to you, and you use that to feed the baby chicks.

The farmer is really just the caretaker, babysitter, if you will, in raising the chickens. He gets baby chicks delivered by Tyson, food delivered by Tyson, and his only job is to return them to Tyson 6 weeks later, and he is paid a flat rate per pound (as I recall, around a dollar a bird).


Who knows what is in that mystery mix. Anyway if you are eating beef, at least it is a few years old, and has been walking around in a field and eating grass or GMO corn, and getting sunshine. Chickens are basically frankenfoods.

244beb1fce659cccdf4ad5df84f6382e.jpg

A daily occurance at the chicken house.

The final point was learning how many of these frail chickens die in transport. They are so weak and sickly and simply unaccustomed to things like sunlight and wind that a good portion of them, from 1% to 6%, just die in transport from the shock.


Around that time I visited Ecuador and ate an absolutely delicious omelet made from "huevos del amor" which are basically the natural free range eggs versus the factory farmed ones. The quality was night and day to our eggs. Then I tried their chicken, and realized what I had been eating back home was not chicken, but some poor frankenfood immitation of the bird.


Bottom line is I find it extremely unhealthy and the nutrient level must be abysmal under those circumstances. If you could buy directly from a farmer it might be ok, but as the Ag Commissioner told me "We raise over a billion chickens a year here. Maybe 10,000 are free range."
I heard some horror stories from rancher friends about beef, but they still eat beef (at the one Montana restaurant that serves their own ranch's beef)). The chicken farmer didn't eat chicken at all.

I gave up chicken for a long time. About a year later, I was on a group camping trip, and we stopped in a fast food restaurant where the only item on the menu without chicken was a mushroom appetizer, so I ordered a chicken quesadilla. An hour later, when walking to the campsite, I was overtaken by diarrhea so strongly and suddenly that I had to drop my pants and defecate just off the path. Your body grows accustomed to many toxins if you consume them regularly, but if you eliminate them, and then eat them again, you will have a strong reaction. I do eat chicken occasionally (a friend had a BBQ last weekend and there was only chicken, so I ate it and it was fine) but in general our chicken is not nutritious, not tasty or flavorsome, not healthy, and should be avoided.

image-placeholder-title.jpg
 

Brebelle3

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Wow, good information.

I buy free range chicken, rotating between breasts and thighs. But I buy from the grocery store. Would you say these come from the same mega farms and that the free range just means they let them see daylight for a bit or walk a couple of laps? I've been buying more chicken lately simply because of the price of red meat.

I alternate sardines and tuna during the week, but again, I choose what I thought was wild caught and more sustainable.

I've been opting for bison recently as opposed to beef or even grass fed beef and will hopefully opt for a quarter or half cow from a farm in the future.

What in the world is healthy anymore? I guess it's time to be a true mountain man and hunt my own.
 

Stoyan

 
Banned
Orthodox
Some relevant and interesting articles:




Made in America or Made in China?



A very based leader!

 
Last edited:

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Bison is incredibly healthy, and unlike cows, which are domesticated and will eat corn in feed lots, all bison is "free range" and eats by grazing. This is the North American animal that the Indians ate; cows are imported from overseas and are unnatural for our region. Ted Turner is a big advocate of bison and is pushing to replace cattle with bison. It tastes better, has less fat, and is more natural.

As for healthy chicken? Buying from a local farmer, co-op, or CSA is your best bet. Your county agricultural agent funded by the state is a good resource if you can't find one on your own. But they are fairly ubiquitous. I wouldn't trust a "free range Tyson" bird, because they will just be doing the bare minimum required to call something "free range" ie let them walk outside an hour a day but otherwise feed them the same mystery chemicals which grow them to full size in 6 weeks, vs a local farmer who will be raising chickens however HE wants to.

What's more, even if the chicken was of decent quality, it is still being processed by Tyson or a similar megaglobohomo corporation. They pay their workers peanuts and rush through production at the expense of food quality and safety:


  • Employee benefits cut: Some breaks and bonuses have been curbed, including combining the previously separate annual Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners.
  • A points-based disciplinary system is used to pressure employees to comply with obligatory overtime which keeps many fearful employees working even when injured or sick.
  • Misleading job advertisements offering new recruits $15 per hour are deceptive as most roles are excluded, according to employees. The Guardian interviewed workers with more than 20 years at Tyson earning below $14 an hour.
  • Speed and output targets are prioritized over employee welfare, hygiene and food safety, according to workers from three plants interviewed by the Guardian.
  • Cockroaches, flies and crickets are rife in some plants and can end up in chicken nuggets and burgers supplied to schools, fast food joints and supermarkets, workers said.
  • Sanchez said he’s shown supervisors the cockroaches – as well as pointing out flies and crickets in the frozen blocks of ground chicken – but says he saw no action taken. The meat mixer just keeps on mixing.

    Last month, Sanchez said he alerted a supervisor to the cross contamination of chicken labelled antibiotic-free with other meat, but was told to carry on.

I asked the county agent about free range and he said truly free range chicken is essentially non existent through traditional retail channels.

If you web search around about "Tyson monopoly" you will find all sorts of articles about price fixing and abusive practices.


Pilgrim’s Pride Corp, owned mainly by Brazil’s JBS SA, agreed on Jan. 11 to pay $75 million to settle claims by direct purchasers of chickens.

The lawsuit says that broilers make up for about 98% of the chicken sold in the country, and the defendants in the case are said to dominate 90% of the market for broilers.

Tyson and Pilgrim’s Pride have reached settlements in a class action lawsuit over alleged broiler chicken price-fixing, adding $155 million to the total settlement proceeds.

Tyson has no long term economic obligation to its farmers, sending them chickens every 6 weeks -- or not -- at its descretion, meanwhile imposing rules and sanctions on them that are costly to the farmers. Farmers earning between $15,000 and $40,000 work 12 to 16 hours a day and have no ability to fight back against Tyson.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
I found this link for a network of pasture raised chicken farms across the US. There should be one fairly close to most of us, although some might be an hour or two away from the nearest member farm. Each of these farms are independent, but they are all listed with this website.

 

The Penitent Man

Kingfisher
Protestant
I received several private messages asking for details on a comment I made about chickens and it was suggested I share publicly so I am re-posting here.

I inspected a chicken farm for a job. The farmer drove me around it and at the very end we got to the chicken coop where they keep all the birds. He said you can go inside and look but I'm not going in there--I won't be able to breathe right for 2 days if I go inside. Something about dander and debris.

domestic-fowl-such-as-chickens-turkeys-ducks-and-geese-5.jpg

This factory produces chickens.

I opened the door and it was pitch black--actually after a few seconds I noticed some dim 10 watt light bulbs up in the ceiling every 10 feet or so. I took a flash photo with my camera and returned to the farmer. I asked him about the darkness and he said they keep the room dark so the chicks always think it is night so they never walk around and develop a skeleton--when it comes to processing they have rubbery bones and the meat can just be squeezed right off like a tube of toothpaste. He also said taking my flash photo probably gave a few of them a heart attack since they never see light.



Then there was this box that looked like a library book return. That was for the dead carcasses. I can't remember the number but I believe they found 3 or 4 dead chickens every morning. They are scooped up and placed in that box, and then someone buys them for fertilizer. The number of deaths was pretty shocking, but it didn't matter to the farmer because of the next point:


The chickens you are eating are 6 WEEKS old.

2388140_original.jpg

80% breast meat, 20% chicken

The normal lifespan of a chicken is several years. But these farmers are raising these chickens to have enormous breasts -- so big in fact that they cannot walk well -- and grow to full size in 6 weeks. How do they do this? Well in the old days our grandfather would go to the feed store and buy chicken feed. These days, if you are a chicken farmer, you either work for McCormack or Tyson, and their contract specifies that they deliver a mystery food to you, and you use that to feed the baby chicks.

The farmer is really just the caretaker, babysitter, if you will, in raising the chickens. He gets baby chicks delivered by Tyson, food delivered by Tyson, and his only job is to return them to Tyson 6 weeks later, and he is paid a flat rate per pound (as I recall, around a dollar a bird).


Who knows what is in that mystery mix. Anyway if you are eating beef, at least it is a few years old, and has been walking around in a field and eating grass or GMO corn, and getting sunshine. Chickens are basically frankenfoods.

244beb1fce659cccdf4ad5df84f6382e.jpg

A daily occurance at the chicken house.

The final point was learning how many of these frail chickens die in transport. They are so weak and sickly and simply unaccustomed to things like sunlight and wind that a good portion of them, from 1% to 6%, just die in transport from the shock.


Around that time I visited Ecuador and ate an absolutely delicious omelet made from "huevos del amor" which are basically the natural free range eggs versus the factory farmed ones. The quality was night and day to our eggs. Then I tried their chicken, and realized what I had been eating back home was not chicken, but some poor frankenfood immitation of the bird.


Bottom line is I find it extremely unhealthy and the nutrient level must be abysmal under those circumstances. If you could buy directly from a farmer it might be ok, but as the Ag Commissioner told me "We raise over a billion chickens a year here. Maybe 10,000 are free range."
I heard some horror stories from rancher friends about beef, but they still eat beef (at the one Montana restaurant that serves their own ranch's beef)). The chicken farmer didn't eat chicken at all.

I gave up chicken for a long time. About a year later, I was on a group camping trip, and we stopped in a fast food restaurant where the only item on the menu without chicken was a mushroom appetizer, so I ordered a chicken quesadilla. An hour later, when walking to the campsite, I was overtaken by diarrhea so strongly and suddenly that I had to drop my pants and defecate just off the path. Your body grows accustomed to many toxins if you consume them regularly, but if you eliminate them, and then eat them again, you will have a strong reaction. I do eat chicken occasionally (a friend had a BBQ last weekend and there was only chicken, so I ate it and it was fine) but in general our chicken is not nutritious, not tasty or flavorsome, not healthy, and should be avoided.

image-placeholder-title.jpg
I think this is happening to us too. Beings raised on an unholy farm.
 

TooFineAPoint

Ostrich
Protestant
@Max Roscoe can you shed some light on this:

I've stopped buying chicken from a conventional supermarket (and basically from butchers as well), because I started to get grossed out eating it.

What I found instead is that having cornish hens, ducks, and turkeys was better. My thinking was even though they are still farmed for supermarket consumption, something about the non-mass nature of them (people just don't buy them in quantities of chickens) means they are fed and raised in a reasonable manner.

I'm wondering if I'm just kidding myself, and that any meat available in a conventional supermarket is gross...

[I buy pastured pork, grass-fed beef and lamb from a local rancher family that I know, so I'm good there, but even their chickens are kind of gross to me, such that I think I just don't like Canadian chicken anymore]
 

username

Ostrich
Gold Member
The film "Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken" goes into some of the topics mentioned in this thread and worth a watch.

In the US and probably elsewhere too, it's free on YouTube... youtube .com/watch?v=dSyicDf9UvI
 

They Live

Sparrow
Catholic
I've been doing cod, salmon wild, grass fed protein powder, and Force of nature bison. And an heirloom chicken from trader joes or whole foods. (they're smaller and pasture raised)

It's getting out of hand, trying to eat less protein, but still get the amount i need,(120-165grms) because of price and chemicals in the food.
 

Cavalier

Kingfisher
Orthodox
@Max Roscoe can you shed some light on this:

I've stopped buying chicken from a conventional supermarket (and basically from butchers as well), because I started to get grossed out eating it.

What I found instead is that having cornish hens, ducks, and turkeys was better. My thinking was even though they are still farmed for supermarket consumption, something about the non-mass nature of them (people just don't buy them in quantities of chickens) means they are fed and raised in a reasonable manner.

I'm wondering if I'm just kidding myself, and that any meat available in a conventional supermarket is gross...

[I buy pastured pork, grass-fed beef and lamb from a local rancher family that I know, so I'm good there, but even their chickens are kind of gross to me, such that I think I just don't like Canadian chicken anymore]
I an fairly sure that Cornish hens are just younger smaller versions of the same chickens that are raised on factory farms.
 

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
@Max Roscoe can you shed some light on this:

What I found instead is that having cornish hens, ducks, and turkeys was better. My thinking was even though they are still farmed for supermarket consumption, something about the non-mass nature of them (people just don't buy them in quantities of chickens) means they are fed and raised in a reasonable manner.

I'm wondering if I'm just kidding myself, and that any meat available in a conventional supermarket is gross...
Honestly I was never a huge fan of chicken.

Is there something to killing and eating smaller animals vs. larger ones, or is that just a cultural stereotype? (rabbit, squirrel, chicken)

One of the big advantages of eating meat, is that you are getting a wide variety of nutrients, vitamins and minerals, as you are not consuming one vegetable, but instead, you are consuming an animal who has consumed and converted many vegetables into energy over a long period of time, concentrating them.

Also, there's just much more meat in those larger animals. One cow can feed many people. A chicken can feed you for one meal. It would be interesting to know the Native American insight on this, as they valued all life, including that of the animals they killed for food, but made sure they honored the animal by using every single part of it, down to the bones and sinews and hides, to honor it in exchange for taking its life.

Does this make killing smaller animals less ethical, since you must kill tens of billions of chickens a year (who lead no sort of life to speak of) versus a cow who at least lives a normal cow life for a few years before going to the slaughterhouse and can feed dozens of families? Perhaps, and also remember the cow is accumulating many more nutrients during its development vs whatever the chicken can develop from eating the TysonFeed for 6 weeks.

I read Anthony Bourdain's take on chickens, and he says every chef loves them because they are cheap, and rather tasteless*, and it's easy to create dozens of different meals, because really what you are tasting in a chicken dish is not the chicken itself but whatever sauces, spices, crust, etc. that the chef ads. In other words, chefs kind of look down on chicken (though they love to serve it as it is cheap and easy).
(* The foreign chickens I have eaten did have more flavor)

So my "gut" says a larger animal is better nutritionally than a smaller animal.
And a pasture raised animal is healthier than anything raised on a CAFO (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation).
If you are looking for medical / nutritional support for this, I know Chris Kresser from Revolution Health Radio talks a lot about the dangers of CAFOs. I found out about him years ago on Return of Kings.


TLDR: My basic dietary advice is remove something from your diet completely for at least a month. Then add it back, and if your body reacts poorly to it, or you don't like it, then don't eat it. You may be "enjoying" supermarket meat that is labeled organic, and it may be "better" than the cheap chicken you used to buy, but that doesn't mean that it is "good" for you.

So cut out the chicken, then in a month try a farm raised local bird and the supermarket "healthy" pasture raised poultry and see how they compare and how you react to each.
 

Maddox

Kingfisher
Protestant
Made in America or Made in China?



Disgusting. I will make sure I never eat any more processed chicken from this joke of a country unless I totally trust the source.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
I grew up vegetarian as my father was very concerned with what we call here the bio industry. The health consequences due to the circumstances and food these animals eat as you describe is one, two is the moral aspect of the story. Animals are God's creation, what despicable civilization have we turned into when they aren't more than fabric goods that are to be "processed" mechanically.

Another good example of the depths we've fallen into over the last decades and the clear and direct attack on our health through what is supposed to be the "food industry".
 

hedonist

Kingfisher
Other Christian
I grew up vegetarian as my father was very concerned with what we call here the bio industry. The health consequences due to the circumstances and food these animals eat as you describe is one, two is the moral aspect of the story. Animals are God's creation, what despicable civilization have we turned into when they aren't more than fabric goods that are to be "processed" mechanically.

Another good example of the depths we've fallen into over the last decades and the clear and direct attack on our health through what is supposed to be the "food industry".
I was a vegetarian for 10 years and don't eat much meat (if I do its organic/free range/wild) except when I work remotely.....and that is another reason I'm starting to think of quitting that work. You make money but half your life you are putting absolute garbage food in your body.

There were some camps where I would near starve myself (I would bring up my own food but you can only go so far).
 

SpyofMoses

Robin
Protestant
I found this link for a network of pasture raised chicken farms across the US. There should be one fairly close to most of us, although some might be an hour or two away from the nearest member farm. Each of these farms are independent, but they are all listed with this website.


Thank you for posting this. I've always eaten chicken and simply cannot imagine going without eating birds. Duck has always been my favorite meat. I knew it was bad from learning about food processing in culinary school, but I didn't know it was this bad! Looks like some of the farmers near me offer more than just chicken, too.
 

antonius_03

Chicken
Orthodox
I received several private messages asking for details on a comment I made about chickens and it was suggested I share publicly so I am re-posting here.

I inspected a chicken farm for a job. The farmer drove me around it and at the very end we got to the chicken coop where they keep all the birds. He said you can go inside and look but I'm not going in there--I won't be able to breathe right for 2 days if I go inside. Something about dander and debris.

domestic-fowl-such-as-chickens-turkeys-ducks-and-geese-5.jpg

This factory produces chickens.

I opened the door and it was pitch black--actually after a few seconds I noticed some dim 10 watt light bulbs up in the ceiling every 10 feet or so. I took a flash photo with my camera and returned to the farmer. I asked him about the darkness and he said they keep the room dark so the chicks always think it is night so they never walk around and develop a skeleton--when it comes to processing they have rubbery bones and the meat can just be squeezed right off like a tube of toothpaste. He also said taking my flash photo probably gave a few of them a heart attack since they never see light.



Then there was this box that looked like a library book return. That was for the dead carcasses. I can't remember the number but I believe they found 3 or 4 dead chickens every morning. They are scooped up and placed in that box, and then someone buys them for fertilizer. The number of deaths was pretty shocking, but it didn't matter to the farmer because of the next point:


The chickens you are eating are 6 WEEKS old.

2388140_original.jpg

80% breast meat, 20% chicken

The normal lifespan of a chicken is several years. But these farmers are raising these chickens to have enormous breasts -- so big in fact that they cannot walk well -- and grow to full size in 6 weeks. How do they do this? Well in the old days our grandfather would go to the feed store and buy chicken feed. These days, if you are a chicken farmer, you either work for McCormack or Tyson, and their contract specifies that they deliver a mystery food to you, and you use that to feed the baby chicks.

The farmer is really just the caretaker, babysitter, if you will, in raising the chickens. He gets baby chicks delivered by Tyson, food delivered by Tyson, and his only job is to return them to Tyson 6 weeks later, and he is paid a flat rate per pound (as I recall, around a dollar a bird).


Who knows what is in that mystery mix. Anyway if you are eating beef, at least it is a few years old, and has been walking around in a field and eating grass or GMO corn, and getting sunshine. Chickens are basically frankenfoods.

244beb1fce659cccdf4ad5df84f6382e.jpg

A daily occurance at the chicken house.

The final point was learning how many of these frail chickens die in transport. They are so weak and sickly and simply unaccustomed to things like sunlight and wind that a good portion of them, from 1% to 6%, just die in transport from the shock.


Around that time I visited Ecuador and ate an absolutely delicious omelet made from "huevos del amor" which are basically the natural free range eggs versus the factory farmed ones. The quality was night and day to our eggs. Then I tried their chicken, and realized what I had been eating back home was not chicken, but some poor frankenfood immitation of the bird.


Bottom line is I find it extremely unhealthy and the nutrient level must be abysmal under those circumstances. If you could buy directly from a farmer it might be ok, but as the Ag Commissioner told me "We raise over a billion chickens a year here. Maybe 10,000 are free range."
I heard some horror stories from rancher friends about beef, but they still eat beef (at the one Montana restaurant that serves their own ranch's beef)). The chicken farmer didn't eat chicken at all.

I gave up chicken for a long time. About a year later, I was on a group camping trip, and we stopped in a fast food restaurant where the only item on the menu without chicken was a mushroom appetizer, so I ordered a chicken quesadilla. An hour later, when walking to the campsite, I was overtaken by diarrhea so strongly and suddenly that I had to drop my pants and defecate just off the path. Your body grows accustomed to many toxins if you consume them regularly, but if you eliminate them, and then eat them again, you will have a strong reaction. I do eat chicken occasionally (a friend had a BBQ last weekend and there was only chicken, so I ate it and it was fine) but in general our chicken is not nutritious, not tasty or flavorsome, not healthy, and should be avoided.

image-placeholder-title.jpg
Very good post. I too noticed a difference between the chicken I ate in the States vs the chicken I would eat fresh in Ecuador (which I would buy regularly in my family's provincial town market when I lived there). The difference is night and day, though I'd say it goes beyond just chicken. It's appalling what these agro-corps are feeding us in the US.
 
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