Anonymous donations?

Guriko

Woodpecker
Gold Member
There’re a lot of people on the internet that I’d like to support (Roosh, Mike Cernovich, Red Pilled America, Jay Dyer, E. Michael Jones etc.) but the amplification of censorship and outright banning out of services for alleged ‘wrong think’ has got me, ironically, thinking about how to that but anonymously.

I didn’t really spend much time pondering about this subject until now, because I started working and focused on establishing myself, but is using Bitcoin still the way to go if you’d like a layer of anonymity? I know that total anonymity on the internet doesn’t exist but if possible I’d like to remove myself from the most of obvious positions.

Any tips, like a nudge in the right direction or a short description on how you guys do it?

Thanks a lot and have a wonderful day! :)
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Any tips, like a nudge in the right direction or a short description on how you guys do it?
I donate to Roosh with BAT/Brave. This is a crypto that you can donate in a few seconds via the Brave browser.



Something from another post:

Get the Brave browser.

* Go to the URL: chrome://rewards/
* Enter ad settings and set it to show 5 per hour
* Turn auto-contribute off

If you are a regular internet user in the US you should get about $10 per month.

Then click on the triangle icon in the address bar and you can donate the tokens you earn from the Brave browser.

You can only successfully send tokens to those who are Brave publishers. That includes:

* Roosh
* Stefan Molyneux
* Infowars
* Bitchute
I doubt people do much with this BAT now. But I think it's one of the most likely cryptos to grow. It's one of the few with a real use, that is being used and growing. They also have a great team. So people you donate to with it could have a nice windfall once it takes off.
 

foolhardie

Pigeon
Using Bitcoin (BTC) with Samourai Wallet, or Monero (XMR) are your best chances of donating to someone on the internet, in a private and un-bannable fashion.

Bitcoin is the most well-known cryptocurrency. However, it's a public blockchain, meaning, the sender, the receiver addresses and the transaction amount are public and visible to everyone. The only thing that offers a modicum of privacy on Bitcoin is that the Bitcoin addresses do not necessarily contain real life identities.

If you want to use Bitcoin in a private way:
  • Obtain Bitcoin without giving your real name/phone number/address, etc. info (collectively known as know-your-customer information). Generally centralized exchanges (such as coinbase, binance, etc.) require its users to submit such info before selling cryptocurrency to them.
  • Use Samourai Wallet: an android wallet with many automated tools for transaction privacy
Or, you can use Monero. Monero is a cryptocurrency similar to Bitcoin, but with transaction privacy options by default. While you have to make Bitcoin transactions stay private, Monero transactions are private by themselves. Therefore, there are not much to look after in using Monero. Just acquire some, and then use it. I would recommend, Cake Wallet, for new users.

Now, here are some ways of getting BTC or XMR without necessarily giving your personal data:
 

bucky

Pelican
Using Bitcoin (BTC) with Samourai Wallet, or Monero (XMR) are your best chances of donating to someone on the internet, in a private and un-bannable fashion.

Bitcoin is the most well-known cryptocurrency. However, it's a public blockchain, meaning, the sender, the receiver addresses and the transaction amount are public and visible to everyone. The only thing that offers a modicum of privacy on Bitcoin is that the Bitcoin addresses do not necessarily contain real life identities.

If you want to use Bitcoin in a private way:
  • Obtain Bitcoin without giving your real name/phone number/address, etc. info (collectively known as know-your-customer information). Generally centralized exchanges (such as coinbase, binance, etc.) require its users to submit such info before selling cryptocurrency to them.
  • Use Samourai Wallet: an android wallet with many automated tools for transaction privacy
Or, you can use Monero. Monero is a cryptocurrency similar to Bitcoin, but with transaction privacy options by default. While you have to make Bitcoin transactions stay private, Monero transactions are private by themselves. Therefore, there are not much to look after in using Monero. Just acquire some, and then use it. I would recommend, Cake Wallet, for new users.

Now, here are some ways of getting BTC or XMR without necessarily giving your personal data:
I tried to buy Monero a few years ago but couldn't figure out how. Seemed like you had to buy a better-known crypto like Bitcoin from one exchange (if that's the correct term), then use it to buy Monero from a different exchange. I'm a crypto newb, obviously. Regardless, with its security features Monero struck me as a crypto that stands out. I'd like to be able to donate to various "wrongthink" causes anonymously too, so I should probably look into it again.
 

foolhardie

Pigeon
I tried to buy Monero a few years ago but couldn't figure out how. Seemed like you had to buy a better-known crypto like Bitcoin from one exchange (if that's the correct term), then use it to buy Monero from a different exchange. I'm a crypto newb, obviously. Regardless, with its security features Monero struck me as a crypto that stands out. I'd like to be able to donate to various "wrongthink" causes anonymously too, so I should probably look into it again.
You are right in the sense that most people first acquire BTC and then exchange for XMR in order to transact privately.

The reason is, there simply are much more ways of acquiring BTC (more ATMs, more sell offers, etc.).

Once you have some BTC, you can exchange it to XMR using the bisq service.
 

foolhardie

Pigeon
Can I load a Bitcoin account at the ATM without having a smartphone?
You will have to explain what you mean by Bitcoin "account".

Normally, you have the option to print out a paper receipt that encodes your private keys (i.e., bitcoins) and take that as a paper wallet (used for short amount of time, due to that piece of paper being subject to lost, or paper getting damaged easily, etc.). So, in this sense, you can get some bitcoins without having a smartphone.

However, if you are going to spend those bitcoins later, you will need to use a wallet software. Again, I recommend specifically Samourai Wallet for transaction privacy needs.
 

Guriko

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Update regarding my foray into crypto-currencies: short version is – holy f*** does this rabbit hole go deep!

About an hour ago I finished redbeards recommended introductory book by Saifedean Ammous The Bitcoin Standard: The Decentralized Alternative to Central Banking. Combined with what I learned about money, the banks and whole financial system from The Money Masters documentary…
caused my head to spin for a while reeling from all the revelations.

Just like finding about the Red Pill so many years ago. Shit, it made me feel nostalgic, ha-ha.

So I think I got the basic knowledge of crypto’s down… now me having an iPhone means I need to buy myself an Android device in order to install the Samourai Wallet. Then by using the Coin Radar website I found a coin ATM located near me which I’ll use to fill my wallet and then I’ll try to make my first transaction.

We’ll see how it goes. Wish me luck.

Besides that I’ll ask a question, which popped into my head as I was reading the book – if I understood correctly the transaction fees using Bitcoins will grow ever larger due to the nature of Bitcoin as it is reaching, if not already reached, saturation levels of how many transaction per days it can make. Does this mean that trying to donate smaller sums of money (10 – 20 – 50 – 100 dollars worth) will be pointless due to high transaction fees or is this circumvented by Bitcoins being made of smaller units of Satoshis? Or is my understanding wrong? It may be a dumb question, if it is, I’m sorry… but for someone not versed into computing, coding all of this is something like out of a sci-fi book.

Have a lovely day you guys!
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Moderator
Update regarding my foray into crypto-currencies: short version is – holy f*** does this rabbit hole go deep!

About an hour ago I finished redbeards recommended introductory book by Saifedean Ammous The Bitcoin Standard: The Decentralized Alternative to Central Banking. Combined with what I learned about money, the banks and whole financial system from The Money Masters documentary…
caused my head to spin for a while reeling from all the revelations.
Great to hear :like:
Besides that I’ll ask a question, which popped into my head as I was reading the book – if I understood correctly the transaction fees using Bitcoins will grow ever larger due to the nature of Bitcoin as it is reaching, if not already reached, saturation levels of how many transaction per days it can make. Does this mean that trying to donate smaller sums of money (10 – 20 – 50 – 100 dollars worth) will be pointless due to high transaction fees or is this circumvented by Bitcoins being made of smaller units of Satoshis? Or is my understanding wrong? It may be a dumb question, if it is, I’m sorry… but for someone not versed into computing, coding all of this is something like out of a sci-fi book.
Most advanced wallets (Blockstream Green, Samourai) have the option to customize how much you pay in fees. Some allow you to go all the way down to 1 satoshi. This is a great option for low time preference transactions (e.g. donations) where you don't care how long it takes for payment to deliver. Sure, your transaction might take 4-12 hours to confirm, but who cares?
 
You will have to explain what you mean by Bitcoin "account".

Normally, you have the option to print out a paper receipt that encodes your private keys (i.e., bitcoins) and take that as a paper wallet (used for short amount of time, due to that piece of paper being subject to lost, or paper getting damaged easily, etc.). So, in this sense, you can get some bitcoins without having a smartphone.

However, if you are going to spend those bitcoins later, you will need to use a wallet software. Again, I recommend specifically Samourai Wallet for transaction privacy needs.
Samurai may be good for privacy but nothing beats the ease of blockchain. If you really need to, you could always tumble the coins.
 

foolhardie

Pigeon
So I think I got the basic knowledge of crypto’s down… now me having an iPhone means I need to buy myself an Android device in order to install the Samourai Wallet.
Yes, Samourai Wallet is Android only. My recommendation would be getting a cheap/second hand Google Pixel 3 or 3a, and then deleting the Google's operating system and installing an open source, privacy respecting mobile operating system, GrapheneOS. The installation of GrapheneOS rather simple (check my post history, I mentioned the steps in doing that in one of my past posts).

Furthermore, you can always join Samourai Wallet's Telegram group, and ask wallet related questions there.

hen by using the Coin Radar website I found a coin ATM located near me which I’ll use to fill my wallet and then I’ll try to make my first transaction.
That's good. Make sure that the Bitcoin ATM does not require you to give up your personal informations (phone number, government ID, etc.). Some of the ATMs in my area do not require me to give such information, and getting some bitcoins is as easy as putting the cash bills inside the ATM, and then scanning my receive address from my Samourai Wallet.

Does this mean that trying to donate smaller sums of money (10 – 20 – 50 – 100 dollars worth) will be pointless due to high transaction fees or is this circumvented by Bitcoins being made of smaller units of Satoshis?
You have a point in saying the fees are going to rise. I would also predict that transaction fees will grow larger in the 5 years down the line. But that's rather a long time horizon. Today, you can make your transaction confirmed in half an hour by paying around <1 usd in transaction fees (that's also dependent on the mempool, which is the pool of bitcoin transactions broadcasted to the network and awaiting for confirmation).

Samurai may be good for privacy but nothing beats the ease of blockchain.
You mean blockchain dot com's wallet? I haven't used that. But a brief overview on the website shows that it lacks private-spending tools that Samourai has.

If you really need to, you could always tumble the coins.
I would advise against using tumblers. Tumblers are custodial mixing services; meaning, they take the ownership of your coins during the mixing process and then promise you to give new/mixed coins back.

Coinjoin within Samourai Wallet (called Whirlpool), on the other hand, is a non-custodial mixer; meaning, the coins you are mixing using the Whirlpool do not leave your custody. Thus, you do not have to trust Samourai to give you back your coins, since they never left your ownership.
 
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foolhardie

Pigeon
@foolhardie could you elaborate what are the downsides to using Samourai Wallet on an out-of-the-box Android OS?
First of all, there are no serious drawbacks in using Samourai on Google's Android. I am not Edward Snowden, nor am I individually targeted by Google, or other big corporations nor governments (not yet, at least, afaik).

So, a newbie can use Samourai on a Google android phone.

However, as one goes deeper into the privacy rabbit hole, he gets dissatisfied with the way he deals with the mobile smartphone OS: he realizes that Google's Android has integrated many Play Store background processes, probably has some root level access to the phone, etc. etc.

So, in his quest in increasing his digital independence and sovereignty, he entertains the idea of switching to GrapheneOS. And perhaps, when he feels the right time, does the switch.
 
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