Any of you guys work Remote?

First post here. Been a longtime lurker.

Currently, I work in Healthcare IT and I travel a lot (100%) and it does pay decent money. However, I'm trying to settle down in Atlanta (where I'm from and live). I probably will never go back to corporate america as that was never my cup of tea. So now I'm looking to get into a remote job that will pay at least 6 figures. So I'm just brainstorming and trying to calculate my next course of action.

My question to you guys is how many of you work remote? What do you guys do?

Do you enjoy it?
 

chicane

Woodpecker
Gold Member
NewDayNewFace said:
First post here. Been a longtime lurker.

Currently, I work in Healthcare IT and I travel a lot (100%) and it does pay decent money. However, I'm trying to settle down in Atlanta (where I'm from and live). I probably will never go back to corporate america as that was never my cup of tea. So now I'm looking to get into a remote job that will pay at least 6 figures. So I'm just brainstorming and trying to calculate my next course of action.

My question to you guys is how many of you work remote? What do you guys do?

Do you enjoy it?
I'm not working remote yet, but I plan to pursue it for my next job/contract. If you haven't run into wfh.io, you should check it out.
 

NewMeta

Newbie
Network Engineer, I work remote, my company has branches in the US and UK, I am considered "out sourced" work legally speaking in order to make my stay in Poland legal.

I make good money, too good for Poland anyway but it allows me to live like a king over here. The drawbacks? I have to be on call once every 6 weekends, I have to keep an eye on emails at most times of the day even when off-shift and I have to constantly be pursing more qualifications and keep up to date with emerging technologies.

I enjoy the money, but sometimes social life is hard, my hobbies keep me sane amongst all this, if I wasn't a recreational athlete on the side im pretty sure I'd have shit all value to girls.
 

DimeBait

Pelican
I work in both the IT and legal field. I'm ultimately looking for the opportunity to freelance remotely so I can live anywhere in the world. Been working on sites like oDesk and fivver every now and again just to test the waters. There is a lot of competition, but cheap Indonesian work will ultimately yield exactly what they pay for.
 

Dark Triad Man

Pigeon
Gold Member
NewDayNewFace said:
First post here. Been a longtime lurker.

Currently, I work in Healthcare IT and I travel a lot (100%) and it does pay decent money. However, I'm trying to settle down in Atlanta (where I'm from and live). I probably will never go back to corporate america as that was never my cup of tea. So now I'm looking to get into a remote job that will pay at least 6 figures. So I'm just brainstorming and trying to calculate my next course of action.

My question to you guys is how many of you work remote? What do you guys do?

Do you enjoy it?
I work 100% remotely, have for the last seven years.

I work in the financial industry (corporate, not personal finance).

There are great advantages, and great drawbacks.

1. No commute.

Assuming 30 minutes each way for a reasonable commute, that means that I have been able to spend 1,820 hours in the last seven years NOT sitting in traffic, absorbing collision risk, accepting wear and tear on my vehicle, breathing fumes and burning gasoline (costs).

2. Work habits.

When you work from home, you are always home. And therefore, you are always working. It is a great temptation to "just check email one more time" and be sucked back into the work habit and neglect other aspects of life. You run the risk of simply sleeping in your office, so to speak, instead of separating work from the rest of your life activities with physical distance.

3. Privacy.

If you have a family, do not expect them to understand that "you are at work" - especially if you have younger children. You are home, and you are expected to contribute and participate as if you were simply surfing the web all day and can step away for any drama or issue that arises.

4. Autonomy.

I do not work well - at all - with any other human being breathing down my neck or popping into my office to dig through what I am working on. The increased autonomy of working remotely is a necessity for me. Some can, some cannot, handle the requirements of work focus without supervision.

Just a few thoughts.

My personal preferences are clear: I will never report to an office daily ever again. I've done it, and I've done it well, but those days are over.

Regards,

Ivan
 
Thanks for the replies everyone. To all my brothers trying to do the same thing we will work remote one of these days.

Dark Triad, did you just happen to find your current job online or how did you hear about it? Does it pay very well?
 

Travesty

Crow
Gold Member
I will never report to an office daily ever again. I've done it, and I've done it well, but those days are over.
Never understood why being able to be on a hamster wheel is an achievement or "work ethic". Waste of human life.

I don't understand the people that suffer social downers by working remote or have trouble leaving work when my time is done that day.

Most jobs I have ever had I think I made a single lasting friend. Any work socializing was almost forced to "be on the team". Usually crappy craft beers and unhealthy food.

Fuck work socializing.

Working remote you can go out for lunch easily and take 2 hours to meet a chick, or go to the beach and day game. That afternoon boxing class? That 10AM yoga class with all the hot waitress and college girls? You can do it and just work later or earlier that day easily with flexibility. Creative type? Want to take 15 minutes to play a musical instrument? Sing? Dance? Stretch session? Afternoon cold shower to wake you up? Healthy food sitting in your fridge you don't have to pack and end up forgetting so you overspending on eating crappy Subway?

Want to spend a month at one of your best friend's houses, sibling, cousin houses that is across the country? No problem.

Socializing should be way easier if you pick where you live.

Can have girls over for afternoon bangs and another one that night.

Don't understand this at all.

I see zero downside.

Every person or friend I have had that went full remote never wanted to step foot in an office again.

People used to have their own hut, or cave, or tribe set up. The commute was going in the great outdoors to gather or hunt. This whole idea of congregating repetitively like a gigantic ant hill is against every strain of natural human happiness there is. We do need plenty of people to do this for society to function the way it is (we won't in the future), I would do everything in my power to avoid it at all costs.
 
Right now, I'm an independent contractor and travel around for work. It's great money so can't complain at all. I never will go back to corporate america. Once I'm done traveling I'm just going to work remote. No desire doing a 9-5 everyday for one employer for a year.
 

skptc

Sparrow
Yeah I just work on my own projects now (eCommerce and SaaS).

It's great. I currently have a private office with a few friends.

Working at home alone makes me less productive so I try to get out of the house everyday.
 

kongzi

Sparrow
How did you guys become able to work remotely? If I'm starting off with Web Development but already have programming skills, how much work experience would you guys say is necessary before one can become comfortable enough to work remotely or freelancing?
 

xxMarco

Robin
I'm really interested in remote work, I work in IT but mostly on local desktop support and sysadmin work. Doesn't seem like a possibility in this area but I had no idea you could do remote work as a Network Engineer.

I also hear a lot of guys talk about Saas and data storage but not too many details. How do you guys get into these specific fields?
 

DimeBait

Pelican
Some companies/contractors will have you do onsite training for a week or so to get acclimated with the infrastructure then let you out on your own. You can easily do moves, adds, & changes remotely.
 

NewMeta

Newbie
xxMarco said:
I'm really interested in remote work, I work in IT but mostly on local desktop support and sysadmin work. Doesn't seem like a possibility in this area but I had no idea you could do remote work as a Network Engineer.

I also hear a lot of guys talk about Saas and data storage but not too many details. How do you guys get into these specific fields?
You need to put infrastructure in place to be able to do this, you need VPN's to your local resources as well as client resources. But it also requires your clients to have basic IT knowledge and how to plug in console cables (easy stuff made complicated by tech tards).

You can do the same for your type of work but as I said above you need an SSLVPN connection to your office resources.
 

General Mayhem

Kingfisher
I work about 3 days per week remote. I have only been with the company 2 months though so I think at the end of the summer I may try to transition to full remote.

Working from home makes corporate work suck so much less. I love it. Need to build a better setup though. Better chair and more monitors.
 

chicane

Woodpecker
Gold Member
General Mayhem said:
I work about 3 days per week remote. I have only been with the company 2 months though so I think at the end of the summer I may try to transition to full remote.

Working from home makes corporate work suck so much less. I love it. Need to build a better setup though. Better chair and more monitors.
Look on ebay and other sources, "demo" Aeron chairs can be found for half price. Still expensive, but very worthwhile.

At work I have 2x 24" 1920x1200 monitors. I would consider that to be about the minimum. In a previous job I had 2x 27" 2560x???? monitors and it was really good. My workstation at home has 3x 24" 1920x1200 monitors. The real estate is great, but they are older monitors that put out a surprising amount of heat.

A friend who is now working remotely has gone to using a single 4K monitor, but he lives in tmux and uses some sort of tiling window manager. I don't know how well that would work for me.

For a dual monitor setup, I strongly recommend getting an adjustable (spring loaded) dual monitor arm. It frees up a lot of valuable desk space right in front of you.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Moderator
General Mayhem said:
I work about 3 days per week remote. I have only been with the company 2 months though so I think at the end of the summer I may try to transition to full remote.

Working from home makes corporate work suck so much less. I love it. Need to build a better setup though. Better chair and more monitors.

GM and others - how do you convince an employer to let you work remotely?

I hate the office space. Socializing with coworkers is a waste, and there are always people dropping by with useless tasks or information.

I like having an office room, though. Somewhere you can leave all your shit, have your work laptop set up, multiple monitors, etc. All of this could be tax deductible.
 

Joga Bonito

Kingfisher
Gold Member
xxMarco said:
I'm really interested in remote work, I work in IT but mostly on local desktop support and sysadmin work. Doesn't seem like a possibility in this area but I had no idea you could do remote work as a Network Engineer.

I also hear a lot of guys talk about Saas and data storage but not too many details. How do you guys get into these specific fields?
I can speak to the data storage bit. If you are currently a sysadmin, I would actually say that you are well positioned(with a bit of training), to jump into the data storage field. Quite a few of my colleagues made the leap this or as Windows or Linux admins and it is seen as a traditional progression.

The field itself is confluence of many different factors however which include but are not limited to networking, Windows server administration, Linux administration, various "Cloud" and DevOps tools like Openstack and Docker, scripting and virtualization. Knowing how user applications best fit within these contexts is also greatly important. From that perspective the best thing to do would be to demonstrate that you have hands on experience with some of these areas and most importantly get certified in some of the popular platforms, then apply to a new position. Below are some skills or certifications that I would recommend:


Networking
-------------
CCNA

Windows Server Administration
-----------------------------------
MCSA

Virtualization
-----------------------------------
VCP-DCV(really tough, will probably need to study for 6 months in ddition to consistent lb work worrk)
you can practice labs here: http://labs.hol.vmware.com/HOL/catalogs/catalog/195 or Google creating a homelab

Cloud Platforms
-----------------------------------
Amazcon Cloud Services- AWS Certified SysOps Administrator - Associate
You'll need to practice in the labs as well as study for this exam as well. Luckily, Amazon always you to use their services free for a month or so and has corresponding labs located here: https://aws.amazon.com/training/

Microsoft Azure is also a big one but I'm not very familiar with thir certification track


DevOps- if you want to be a developer you'll need to be familiar with at least one of these tools among others
------------------------------------
Docker
Chef
Puppet

Linux
------------------------------------
LPIC-1 or get a Red Hat Linux Certification since that is used in most enterprise environments
Installing Red Hat or closely related distribution like Fedora or Debian on your personal computer would provide great practice here. Do it via command line. It can also be dual installed with Windows.

Scripting
-----------------------------------
Learn Perl, Python, Go, SQL, or Bash

Overall, it seems like a lot to be aware of and it is, but due to companies embracing the DevOps operations model where sysadmins and developers are collaborating more closely, so as a result job titles have gotten less siloed. However, it is worth it sine salaries are very high and these skills are relatively rare. I would focus on demonstrating and certifying(not necessary, but makes you a stronger candidate) in the networking, Windows and Linux areas above first and foremost. Most of the storage arrays you will work with have a Linux backbone, so having that knowledge will make them easier to administer.

After you have a grasp of the fundamentals(network, Linux, Windows), take a look at the job listings you want and learn the cloud platform(AWS or Azure) that you are more interested in. This will involve alot of self teaching and labwork on your own time, especially if your organization does not sponsor you to learn this stuff. Google is best is learning how to practice these technologies when you haven't been exposed to them yet. It's not a bad idea to include this as experience on your resume if you do build your own lab and I've heard of that getting people interviews. From there, you either have to network your way into a position or apply once you are confident that you meet the requisite baseline. LinkedIn is probably best for this since you can message managers and recruiters directly. Also, be on the lookout for new grad programs from companies like NetApp, EMC, and Rackspace that all have training programs to learn some of these skills. Generally these are an option if you have 3 years or less of experience.

Feel free to sk me any questions, I work remotely doing this stuff.
 

poledaddy

Robin
Gold Member
GM and others - how do you convince an employer to let you work remotely?
I don't have an exact formula but I can share my story. I started working remote 1.5 years ago. Not only that, I moved across country. They fly me back every other month or so for on-site meetings.

I actually wasn't expecting it to go down. I had a job offer from another company in the new place I was moving to. My employer did not have a remote work policy and was old school, so I didn't even consider it. I was mainly coming in with "I love working here, but I need to change things up so I'm leaving" to my boss. She said had people in my role work remote for her at a prior company, and it worked out good, and she was down to go the C-level fight for me, if I would stay. She made it happen. I've had the horror stories of female bosses, but I will be forever thankful for this woman going to bat for me and putting her own ass on the line.

Anyway, like anything it's a negotiation and will depend on the mindset of the executives in the company, the culture, and how much you are valued, and how much they trust you. Are they going to think "if I let one person do it, then everyone will ask to work remote". They will weigh that against the pain involved of trying to replace you. The trust factor is key as well.

It's since worked out well for both sides, but I think if I had gone in and said "hey guys, is it cool if I move out west and will you fly me back for meetings?" I could be wrong but I think they would have told me to fuck off. For my situation, I don't see any other way could have done this without another option in-hand.
 

General Stalin

Crow
Gold Member
I also work in IT as a sysadmin/operations analyst.

I worked remote for my last company for a few months before I left and it was great. I'll admit its a little harder to stay productive when being in your own home. It's incredibly easy and tempting to fuck off and neglect things you should/could be doing. Being proactive is also difficult - this is just my personal experience and other people's work ethic may differ.

That said, "working" in your underwear in your house is great. Not having to commute and being in the comfort of your home with all the privacy you want is great. It's especially nice when you are "off work" you are already home. Just get dressed and go about whatever you wanted to do for the day - no need to drive home, change, unwind, etc.
 

Travesty

Crow
Gold Member
The people I have seen with success for remote did 1 of 3 things:

1) Got the job that way off the bat - they only look for fully remote positions and won't consider anything else.

2) They tell their current company you can give me a remote position or I am leaving.

3) They give a bullshit family excuse (my wife needs to live near her mother, my kid needs to go to a special school, I have sick parents that need looking after).
 
Top