Any of you guys work Remote?

Those of you with training in engineering, work as a patent examiner may be a good long term investment. After your first year, they allow you to telecommute one day per week. After two years, they let you work remotely 100% of the time. You could even work from other countries, except for certain countries which are high-risk for data security.

Might be an option for those who want to do this but aren't ready to start their own business yet.
 

Rico Ramon

Sparrow
I work as an international marketing and partnership consultant for record labels and brands in London after moving here 8 months ago. I like the freedom after having a corporate job from when I was like 23 for about 16 years or so. Like so many are saying, If I want to work in a hotel that has alot of creatives, etc; I can, If I want to work-out at 11am or get an haircut and have a coffee and smoke, I can. The freedom is priceless....
 

exitus

Sparrow
It is my dream to work remotely and live in Europe. What's the best way to go about doing this? I would only need $20k a year.
 

qwertyuiop

Woodpecker
Caladbolg said:
Those of you with training in engineering, work as a patent examiner may be a good long term investment. After your first year, they allow you to telecommute one day per week. After two years, they let you work remotely 100% of the time. You could even work from other countries, except for certain countries which are high-risk for data security.

Might be an option for those who want to do this but aren't ready to start their own business yet.
X2.
 

BostonBMW

Kingfisher
Anyone working remotely in an accounting/finance related role? I would love to learn about your experiences.

I need to find the time to get the CPA licensing sorted out. I feel like it'll put me in a better position to work remotely in the future.
 
Rico Ramon said:
I work as an international marketing and partnership consultant for record labels and brands in London after moving here 8 months ago. I like the freedom after having a corporate job from when I was like 23 for about 16 years or so. Like so many are saying, If I want to work in a hotel that has alot of creatives, etc; I can, If I want to work-out at 11am or get an haircut and have a coffee and smoke, I can. The freedom is priceless....
This sounds pretty interesting. I actually worked for a music label in the US, in the mid 90's and we licensed some music to labels in the UK.

Tell us more about this work if you feel comfortable with that.

G
 

Peregrine

Pelican
Gold Member
BostonBMW said:
Anyone working remotely in an accounting/finance related role? I would love to learn about your experiences.

I need to find the time to get the CPA licensing sorted out. I feel like it'll put me in a better position to work remotely in the future.
I somewhat fit this bill. Can try to answer questions.
 

BostonBMW

Kingfisher
Peregrine said:
BostonBMW said:
Anyone working remotely in an accounting/finance related role? I would love to learn about your experiences.

I need to find the time to get the CPA licensing sorted out. I feel like it'll put me in a better position to work remotely in the future.
I somewhat fit this bill. Can try to answer questions.
Thanks. Please feel free to not respond to any questions that you consider to be sensitive/confidential.\

1. Did you secure a remote position or transitioned into remote role?
2. If you do freelance accounting work, did you build your own client base from scratch or did you take clients with you from your office job?
3. Even if you don’t have a CPA, have you heard of freelancers/folks working as remote CPAs? I see blog posts and mentions here and there.
4. Any unique accounting/finance related specific challenges? Have to show up at the office for Audits? Due diligence in an M&A?

I have a growing Real Estate business, however I really like to have a steady cash flow. After plotting my escape from the day job every year and turning back (fear of loss of income, W-2 wages come in handy for mortgages/bank financing), my game plan is now:

1. Start taking the CPA exams.
2. Work on a business plan (go freelance vs. work for a company).
3. Execute.

Obviously, this is a simplified version of what I expect to be a very time consuming process (prepping and taking the CPA exams, finding a remote position or going freelance).

Ultimately, what I am looking for is experiences of other finance and accounting professionals who have been able to make the jump to remote.

My ideal scenario would be to make decent money working remotely so that I can continue to focus on Real Estate investing and living in lower cost/warmer locales (Boston is painfully expensive).
 

Peregrine

Pelican
Gold Member
1. Did you secure a remote position or transitioned into remote role?

Transitioned. Was going to leave in December, asked for a massive raise, they said yes, so I stayed. Started working from home full time this week. Might as well use the leverage while I have it (my boss says they're having a rough time replacing me). Also, I've known the team for five years-ish now, and they fully support me sticking it to the brass so it's not like I'm fucking over any teammates.

2. If you do freelance accounting work, did you build your own client base from scratch or did you take clients with you from your office job?

I'm not an accountant, but I have friends who are. One of them is building his client base from upwork.

3. Even if you don’t have a CPA, have you heard of freelancers/folks working as remote CPAs? I see blog posts and mentions here and there.

I don't know any CPAs working remotely as W-2s. The ones I do know have their own book of clients. They probably exist, but I don't know any.

4. Any unique accounting/finance related specific challenges? Have to show up at the office for Audits? Due diligence in an M&A?

Yup, that's the reason why I said I somewhat fit the bill. I'm not fully remote. I haven't been in the office all week, but I also can't piss off to Thailand for a month in case something comes up that needs a face-to-face chat.

Sounds like a good plan you got there. Yeah, I wouldn't quit just yet either for your stated reasons. Just take it easy and do enough to not get fired/don't take initiative. That's what I'm doing right now.

What's a 1br in the best locations rent for in Boston?

BostonBMW said:
Peregrine said:
BostonBMW said:
Anyone working remotely in an accounting/finance related role? I would love to learn about your experiences.

I need to find the time to get the CPA licensing sorted out. I feel like it'll put me in a better position to work remotely in the future.
I somewhat fit this bill. Can try to answer questions.
Thanks. Please feel free to not respond to any questions that you consider to be sensitive/confidential.\

1. Did you secure a remote position or transitioned into remote role?
2. If you do freelance accounting work, did you build your own client base from scratch or did you take clients with you from your office job?
3. Even if you don’t have a CPA, have you heard of freelancers/folks working as remote CPAs? I see blog posts and mentions here and there.
4. Any unique accounting/finance related specific challenges? Have to show up at the office for Audits? Due diligence in an M&A?

I have a growing Real Estate business, however I really like to have a steady cash flow. After plotting my escape from the day job every year and turning back (fear of loss of income, W-2 wages come in handy for mortgages/bank financing), my game plan is now:

1. Start taking the CPA exams.
2. Work on a business plan (go freelance vs. work for a company).
3. Execute.

Obviously, this is a simplified version of what I expect to be a very time consuming process (prepping and taking the CPA exams, finding a remote position or going freelance).

Ultimately, what I am looking for is experiences of other finance and accounting professionals who have been able to make the jump to remote.

My ideal scenario would be to make decent money working remotely so that I can continue to focus on Real Estate investing and living in lower cost/warmer locales (Boston is painfully expensive).
 

BostonBMW

Kingfisher
^

Peregrine, you are truly a wealth of information. I wish I could rep you again. Let me respond to your comments:

1. Transitioned. Was going to leave in December, asked for a massive raise, they said yes, so I stayed. Started working from home full time this week. Might as well use the leverage while I have it (my boss says they're having a rough time replacing me). Also, I've known the team for five years-ish now, and they fully support me sticking it to the brass so it's not like I'm fucking over any teammates.

BBMW: Nice! I have been with my firm for 5+ years as well. I work in a trader type environment so I won't be able to ask to work remotely and they can't agree to it, either. There are days were I am very much on my A game, while other days, I am looking at RE listings, typing up a game plan for the next acquisition.

I'm not an accountant, but I have friends who are. One of them is building his client base from upwork.

BBMW: Me neither. I am an FP&A guy (corp finance) who has transition to my current role. Almost doing the accounting thing backward (taking classes, studying for the CPA etc.). Unlike many people, I am into accounting (maybe because I have not done the big 4 grind) and see it (+ CPA) as a pathway to working remotely/independently/in a relatively recession proof career.

I don't know any CPAs working remotely as W-2s. The ones I do know have their own book of clients. They probably exist, but I don't know any.

BBMW: Agreed. I am seeing the same situation. Not too many on W-2s.

Yup, that's the reason why I said I somewhat fit the bill. I'm not fully remote. I haven't been in the office all week, but I also can't piss off to Thailand for a month in case something comes up that needs a face-to-face chat.

BBMW: I hear you. Right now not having to go to the office could allow me to go to the property that I am flipping in Rhode Island or fly out for a 3 day weekend to look at houses in Michigan. At the office, I have worked like a mad man, any measure of flexibility would be amazing.

Sounds like a good plan you got there. Yeah, I wouldn't quit just yet either for your stated reasons. Just take it easy and do enough to not get fired/don't take initiative. That's what I'm doing right now.

BBMW: I am trying to do exactly what you described. If I can keep up the Real Estate and get a few CPA exams under my belt, I won't mind the job: Steady paycheck, know my stuff, decent rapport with co-workers.


What's a 1br in the best locations rent for in Boston?


BBMW: $2200-$2500/month in places like Back Bay, Seaport etc.
 

8ball

Kingfisher
Update on my remote problem and my current status as well as lessons learned.

1. Remote work is overrated. I thought i would get so much extra time and flexibility to perhaps focus on my health and help start a side business. The result is abysmal, the work was the same and instead of siting in an office i was sitting at home. Very few benefits, ya la traffic sux and i guess you can work while you are not wearing pants.

2. People get jealous of your status, the fact they have to come in and you don't creates a rift between you and other employees.

3. When you get remote status as a benefit earned by threatening to take another job there is swift retaliation. Executives are in constant suspicion that you are leaving and they need seek answers elsewhere in the company in order to reduce your leverage

4. You get squeezed out of important decisions and when mixed with retaliation it becomes a difficult situation.

Now i have decided to bounce and will be in full job search mode before my leverage in the company is obsolete. My direct manager is putting in his notice and will be leaving due to unhappiness caused by shitty decisions from above. This means the strongest ally i had will be soon gone. I learned some important lessons throughout all this: go with your first instict, if you smell something fish and want to bounce, don't let them buy you with money because that will be temporary. If they throw a 15% raise and a couple of bonuses, it sounds great, how much of it will you actually receive. You will be there when the 2nd or 3rd bonus is timed for distribution? When you are holding the cards, a company will be extremely gracious but in the back of their head they are thinking "All we gotta do now, is get him to say yes, then roll out the plan to zero his leverage."
 

Peregrine

Pelican
Gold Member
8ball said:
Update on my remote problem and my current status as well as lessons learned.

1. Remote work is overrated. I thought i would get so much extra time and flexibility to perhaps focus on my health and help start a side business. The result is abysmal, the work was the same and instead of siting in an office i was sitting at home. Very few benefits, ya la traffic sux and i guess you can work while you are not wearing pants.
True, remote work is definitely overrated. The main benefit is if you can get a day's work done in 2 hours and have the rest of the time for yourself (while keeping an eye on your email for new developments).

2. People get jealous of your status, the fact they have to come in and you don't creates a rift between you and other employees.
Couldn't agree more.

3. When you get remote status as a benefit earned by threatening to take another job there is swift retaliation. Executives are in constant suspicion that you are leaving and they need seek answers elsewhere in the company in order to reduce your leverage

4. You get squeezed out of important decisions and when mixed with retaliation it becomes a difficult situation.

Now i have decided to bounce and will be in full job search mode before my leverage in the company is obsolete. My direct manager is putting in his notice and will be leaving due to unhappiness caused by shitty decisions from above. This means the strongest ally i had will be soon gone. I learned some important lessons throughout all this: go with your first instict, if you smell something fish and want to bounce, don't let them buy you with money because that will be temporary. If they throw a 15% raise and a couple of bonuses, it sounds great, how much of it will you actually receive. You will be there when the 2nd or 3rd bonus is timed for distribution? When you are holding the cards, a company will be extremely gracious but in the back of their head they are thinking "All we gotta do now, is get him to say yes, then roll out the plan to zero his leverage."
Yes and yes. I only recommend people work remote if you don't care about your political standing and are merely trading time for money.
 

weambulance

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Since 99% of the people in my field are outright SJWs or normal fairly-hardcore lefties, I figure I'm probably less likely to get shitcanned and will do better politically if I stay away from an office environment. I'm not very good at the chameleon game.

There're lots of reasons I prefer working remotely. But the networking problem is real. Not networking properly is fucking me now, so as soon as I'm back on my feet I'm going to start making an effort to make it to conferences and events and whatnot.
 

lika91

Sparrow
How are people thinking about this topic right now and for the time the corona crisis will be over?

I have just started a job as digital marketing/content/community coordinator and I quite like that kind of work. Currently we are working at home, but my boss said during an AMA the other days, that there is no company policy regarding remote work and even though its a quite dynamic and innovative company he doesnt want permanent remote work policies in this company.

Before I had started this job, I was actually looking for a completely different job, but I realised now that my number 1 priority long-term is to work remote, so I can travel whenever and live wherever I want to. So yeah, the plan is to stay with the company for a bit and then either go remote with them or find a remote job.

Anyone in a smilar position regarding digital marketing? What options are out there?
 
I work 100% remotely, have for the last seven years.

I work in the financial industry (corporate, not personal finance).

There are great advantages, and great drawbacks.

1. No commute.

Assuming 30 minutes each way for a reasonable commute, that means that I have been able to spend 1,820 hours in the last seven years NOT sitting in traffic, absorbing collision risk, accepting wear and tear on my vehicle, breathing fumes and burning gasoline (costs).

2. Work habits.

When you work from home, you are always home. And therefore, you are always working. It is a great temptation to "just check email one more time" and be sucked back into the work habit and neglect other aspects of life. You run the risk of simply sleeping in your office, so to speak, instead of separating work from the rest of your life activities with physical distance.

3. Privacy.

If you have a family, do not expect them to understand that "you are at work" - especially if you have younger children. You are home, and you are expected to contribute and participate as if you were simply surfing the web all day and can step away for any drama or issue that arises.

4. Autonomy.

I do not work well - at all - with any other human being breathing down my neck or popping into my office to dig through what I am working on. The increased autonomy of working remotely is a necessity for me. Some can, some cannot, handle the requirements of work focus without supervision.

Just a few thoughts.

My personal preferences are clear: I will never report to an office daily ever again. I've done it, and I've done it well, but those days are over.

Regards,

Ivan
Thank you for your detailed response.

What remote corporate finance jobs might be available for those not in corporate finance?

What do you think of personal finance jobs for those who want to make a transition?

What online work can support a family that have skills that can be learned on the job or relatively quickly?

I am in teaching at a charter school, a career that isn’t working for me for several reasons, and am looking to make a transition quickly.

Thank you,
Bill
 
How are people thinking about this topic right now and for the time the corona crisis will be over?

I have just started a job as digital marketing/content/community coordinator and I quite like that kind of work. Currently we are working at home, but my boss said during an AMA the other days, that there is no company policy regarding remote work and even though its a quite dynamic and innovative company he doesnt want permanent remote work policies in this company.

Before I had started this job, I was actually looking for a completely different job, but I realised now that my number 1 priority long-term is to work remote, so I can travel whenever and live wherever I want to. So yeah, the plan is to stay with the company for a bit and then either go remote with them or find a remote job.

Anyone in a smilar position regarding digital marketing? What options are out there?
I think this crisis will be over around say July but will be brought back in October because it is ultimately a political operation. The machine behind the event is moving as much money from the productive classes to the super-rich while distracting everyone in the process. Part of that operation is to keep people working online and at home to save costs. Isolated and often distracted people can’t do much.
Regarding work, I would prepare to cut out the middle man or the employer. Go directly to the client and keep all you earn.
Question: I don’t have experience in marketing (I have experience teaching and event planning) but am interested in learning. Can you recommend a way to learn about marketing and how to find work online in the field? Thank you.
 

bubs

Pigeon
I’m a project manager who managed in theory remotely for 3 years from a satellite office cubicle where the “real work” was getting done either by subcontractors or our primary facility thousands of miles away. Every time I had to run a meeting, I had to unplug my laptop from the cube farm and go to a private conference room. This happened at least once or twice every day. Several time when a private office opened up I was bypassed as they waited for someone “more important” to take the private office despite the lack of functionality that I needed as a manager. Finally I set up a home office and just told my boss I’ll be working from home more frequently when I have important meetings I need to run. He didn’t like that one bit of course as he wasn’t dictating the rules.

Now that we have been forced to work from home for several months, life is good for me (from a work perspective). I get more work done, much more effectively and efficiently and I don’t need to be treated like a second class cube jockey.
 
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