Anyone demoralized about job opportunities?

I've felt pretty demoralized recently about work, I've been consistently underemployed for the past year or so. Was never one of those lucky people who got government gibs. I'm diving into looking for a new job again, and the thing that shocks me is how little many of these jobs pay, the hoops you have to jump through to get hired (and even pre-screenings), and never getting callbacks even for basic jobs... For example, I applied for several jobs to sell consumer electronics (which is something I can easily do given I'm studying to be a programmer and previously did retail sales), and I never get a call back (a job which I assume pays $12 an hour).
Get a trade. I'm switching up to HVAC.
 

FrancisK

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Something is wrong because every business owner I know is absolutely desperate for employees, paying stupid numbers for incompetent workers doing medial jobs. Food service places and low tier jobs have become complete disasters because they’re all understaffed and the employees they do have do not care one bit about keeping their jobs. I have a friend who owns a bunch of coffee shop franchises which are normally 24hrs and even though he’s busier than ever he has had to start closing at 7pm just because he can’t find anyone to work and orders are taking 3 times as long to complete.

My 30 year old bum loser cousin who has never had a real job in his life the highlight of his resume is he’s good at making pizzas and had been fired from every job he’s ever had just got a gig at a mortgage place paying 70k a year after working part time there for $20 an hour for 3 months. This guy spent the past 12 years of his life waking up at 2pm and only getting out of bed for the reason of finding someone to get him high.

This is all in garbage Michigan which has a terrible economy. Every business you pass has a “help wanted” sign in the window. Nobody wants to work, there is no reason to work with all the handouts.


Something is wrong if you can’t find a job, I don’t know what it is but you need to figure it out and get rolling. The only thing I can say is that maybe don’t limit yourself just because you got a specific degree. My older sister does IT for a major bank making 150k a year, she has a masters in health administration and i swear still uses AOL, one time she asked me to rewind a DVD before she gave it back.
 
Something is wrong if you can’t find a job

Your post amounts to "become a Starbucks barista, bro" or "just get a masters degree."

This is not good advice or a good assessment of the economy. I also know and work with several restaurant owners. They're each broke and having trouble staying afloat. They definitely aren't hiring.
 

FrancisK

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Your post amounts to "become a Starbucks barista, bro" or "just get a masters degree."

This is not good advice or a good assessment of the economy. I also know and work with several restaurant owners. They're each broke and having trouble staying afloat. They definitely aren't hiring.

You make it seem like that was the only thing I said. If you think a job is beneath you but you have no other options then what do you do....just not work? Who does that sound like?

Everyone works, the wealthiest people I know work 7 days a week. For some people they get lucky and it comes easy but for most it doesn’t and the only way to make it is to work hard.

Never said to get a masters, actually I said the opposite. And if a Starbucks barista was the only job available then guess what I’ll be doing until I can do better? Starbucks is a terrible example though because of what a horrible company they are and they’re coffee is terrible!

If you have a nice shiny degree but can’t find a job and the only thing available is a warehouse job, would you not work the warehouse job until you can do better?
 
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You make it seem like that was the only thing I said. If you think a job is beneath you but you have no other options then what do you do....just not work? Who does that sound like?

Everyone works, the wealthiest people I know work 7 days a week. For some people they get lucky and it comes easy but for most it doesn’t and the only way to make it is to work hard.

Never said to get a masters, actually I said the opposite. And if a Starbucks barista was the only job available then guess what I’ll be doing until I can do better? Starbucks is a terrible example though because of what a horrible company they are and they’re coffee is terrible!

If you have a nice shiny degree but can’t find a job and the only thing available is a warehouse job, would you not work the warehouse job until you can do better?

The only sector which has really been adding jobs back is restaurants and bars as things have reopened (which is the main reason you were only able to highlight that sector). Real unemployment (including people who have fallen off the rolls) is probably still around 15%. I know a 50 year old who was laid off as Vice President of Operations at a major national company. Should he just go work at the local coffee house or wait for a better opportunity? Should he become a garbage man if that's all that's available?
 

FrancisK

Woodpecker
Gold Member
The only sector which has really been adding jobs back is restaurants and bars as things have reopened (which is the main reason you were only able to highlight that sector). Real unemployment (including people who have fallen off the rolls) is probably still around 15%. I know a 50 year old who was laid off as Vice President of Operations at a major national company. Should he just go work at the local coffee house or wait for a better opportunity? Should he become a garbage man if that's all that's available?

Come to Michigan, if you actually have any kind of work ethic you will have no problem whatsoever. Never in my life would I have thought I would be telling someone to come to Michigan for opportunity but if you’re saying people are out of work where you are and there is no opportunity then so be it.

In your example if he has a nest egg and is willing to let it dwindle for a while then he should do as he pleases. But if he’s broke and has no prospects then he should whatever he has to do to get to a better place in life, even if it means working a job that isn’t as prestigious or pay as well as his previous one.

Are you making the argument that people are somehow entitled to better jobs?
 

jakester318

Sparrow
Maybe I'm being a little hard on people but I think job seekers don't have a clue. It's not the job market, it's the people looking for jobs that have a problem.

For one, I think a lot of job seekers are aimless in their pursuit of a job. They approach job hunting in a haphazard manner without a clear direction for themselves. For example, a resume or a LinkedIn profile is written in such a way that a recruiter looking at their profile doesn't know what it is the job seeker is looking for. Perfect example of a lack of direction found in a resume:

"Highly motivated individual with a knack of getting things done looking for a challenging role." And then when you read their experience, it's a bit about maybe doing some work as a cashier or as a general laborer. The problem with this approach is that this type of job seeker is just trying to cast as wide of a net as possible, hoping and praying that someone will give them a shot at something. But the manager at the other end doing the hiring is perplexed by this type of job applicant because what is it that the person is really looking for? Do you want to be a cashier or a laborer? Do you want a career in construction, in retail, what? This is the lack of direction problem many people face.

Secondly, even people who do have a good direction, their resumes can be utter rubbish. It's not compelling and its not anything that makes them stand out from other applicants. You could have great experience but if your resume doesn't put you in the best possible light, you will be overlooked by candidates that have better resumes.

Thirdly, people are careless with their presentation and their interviewing skills. I've sat in on job interviews and been on countless interviews myself. I've gotten good feedback on my interviewing skills from people so I know what I'm talking about. Bad job candidates don't ask good questions that show interest in the role beyond just "please give me a job." Does the person really have the skills that the role is looking for? The candidate should be communicating to the hiring manager how his experience translates to the job and how he is a good fit. The interview should be a two-sided conversation where the hiring manager is asking questions and the job seeker is asking questions, so that both parties feel good about each other and that there is mutual understanding of what the role requires and how its a good fit for everyone involved.

I think a lot of people are resistant to change and growth. You can challenge people on growing in these areas but most people seem not to like to change their approach or their resume. And that is why many people are without jobs.
 

eradicator

Peacock
Gold Member
I work in the trades in a big city. No driverless/computer-driven flatbed would be able to pull into a job site -basically backing up the wrong way on a one-way street through a gate not much wider than the flatbed. Lol. And the same goes for basic driving in any big city.

I too feel for the young bucks. I remember how much different everything was when I reported to USMC bootcamp after high school in the summer of '03. It used to be a uber-masculine outfit where you could get your life together. If I was a young buck today I would look into the Coast Guard. Hopefully, get a couple of good duty assignments in FL or CA, stack some money, and get your shit together.

Either that or be a ready-mix driver.

I live in a city and tend to agree with robot drivers in the city.

Robots will be ok on the highway but in the city? They will have to stop for j walkers due to their programming. In midtown Manhattan there are loads of j walkers and a robot will be waiting for them all day . It just won’t work in a big city. I mean maybe one day sure when the AI is superior to a human but we are not even close to that day yet and not in our lifetimes
 
For what it's worth I trialed a restaurant job as a manager and it paid $12 per hour. Things in the restaurant were in such a bad state that I gave no thought about leaving and never showing up again. Simply, it's unreasonable to expect a manager, someone with experience to make 12.
 

DanielH

Pelican
Start creating your own opportunities, its never been easier to work online. The information is all out there
The engineering company I work for is hiring all sorts of remote work positions all around the country. Mostly programmers & IT but any mechanical, marine, diesel, or electrical engineer could walk into a position right now. I wish I could share the name but I'm not going to dox myself. But since it's remote now they've wisened up and have opened a location in a fairly rural area, presumably to pay their employees less and pay less in terms of leasing property.

Unrelated - I think with remote positions the Pareto Principle is more true than ever, the concept that 20% of workers do 80% of the work. There's female engineers who do pretty much nothing because they're almost untouchable, but you hardly ever see them in senior roles because teams would collapse. If you can network, market yourself well, and be in the top tier of workers, there's plenty of opportunity out there still.
 
Well, you are not a "finished" dev or programmer, so you will not get good pay from that. You could, of course, freelance a bit, if you can code and are really desperate and/or really like that kind of stuff.

There are multiple factors that are driving the job market at the moment. Firstly, wages are down, because of the plandemic and insecurity; secondly, nearly every single company nowadays has unrealistic expectations and multiple screening stages; thirdly, which is related to the second point, the companies just announce they have work, but do not hire (what you said); the fourth factor would be that online applications are indeed pretty flawed and really do have to have a screening regiment, which makes selection harder, especially with so many applicants (another factor) due to so many opportunities to find a given company and job offer. I reckon it is like the famous supermarket example, where more selection makes your choice way harder.
 
Are you making the argument that people are somehow entitled to better jobs?

We're talking past each other. It's not always the better option to take whatever crumbs you're thrown. You'll waste your time and energy. Sometimes waiting for (or creating) is the answer.

But what do I know...I'm not a barista with $100,000 in student loan debt.
 
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