Anyone demoralized about job opportunities?

Monty_Brogan

Woodpecker
Gold Member
You certainly sound Jewish with your attitude.

Hahahaha… this is great!

Current tradesman here. Best bet for joining the trades is to go through an apprenticeship through a major union. Just google “Iron Worker local in XYZ city,” and look when they’re hiring. It can be tough to get in, especially these days.

Trades I would not do: plumbing and electrical. That’s just my personal opinion. The area I grew up in every man joins the trades. I know of one guy who was a plumber and then got sick of it and now is a jail guard in probably one of the worst jails in the country. He’d rather do that than be plumber. Let that sink in.

The railroad is good too. Lots of hours, but lots of comradery. Signalman for their.
 

eradicator

Peacock
Gold Member
I assume you are currently working in one of those fields. If so, could I chat with you via direct message about some tips to get started? Thank you.
I opened a moving company and work with some of them, and I started somewhat late. If I had it to do over again I’d become an electrician or carpenter.


It’s a fair point that you should make absolutely sure you actually like the field
 
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fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I opened a moving company and work with some of them, and I started somewhat late. If I had it to do over again I’d become an electrician or carpenter.


It’s a fair point that you should make absolutely sure you actually like the field
Thank you. I'm looking most toward electrician as I think carpenter is a bit too physically demanding for me in the long-run. Also considering design engineering.
 

FrancisK

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Thank you. I'm looking most toward electrician as I think carpenter is a bit too physically demanding for me in the long-run. Also considering design engineering.


To play devils advocate, while electrician might be an evolving profession right now, a carpenter will ALWAYS be in demand regardless of any situation.

Either way a trade is a very good living right now, all my friends who did trades have become extremely successful the last couple years from it. I would say also try and come up with an idea, even if it's just re-hashing an existing one or improving one or just moving one to a better location. But as someone who has been a business owner and has never had a real job in his life, always either worked for my dads businesses or myself I've never cut a paycheck before, for the first time in my life I don't have a single idea in my head regardless of how much money I had to invest and I've never not had an idea in my head.


So yea....trade it is!
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
To play devils advocate, while electrician might be an evolving profession right now, a carpenter will ALWAYS be in demand regardless of any situation.
I talked with an ex-carpenter today in fact, who told me that it's really a job for young strapping lads (like 20 year olds) and best retired from by 40-45. He did say that finish carpentry, cabinetry and fine carpentry could possibly be a good option, though it's not what he did. I need to get more information about that from a business / marketing perspective.
 

FrancisK

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I talked with an ex-carpenter today in fact, who told me that it's really a job for young strapping lads (like 20 year olds) and best retired from by 40-45. He did say that finish carpentry, cabinetry and fine carpentry could possibly be a good option, though it's not what he did. I need to get more information about that from a business / marketing perspective.

Yea that sounds about right but when I think of a trade I think of starting small just you but eventually earning a reputation for strong work and creating demand for your services while building a company where instead of breaking your back you’re the boss delegating work and managing.

Do you think of it as just slaving away for years and years until your back gives out? That’s something really interesting…
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Yea that sounds about right but when I think of a trade I think of starting small just you but eventually earning a reputation for strong work and creating demand for your services while building a company where instead of breaking your back you’re the boss delegating work and managing.

Do you think of it as just slaving away for years and years until your back gives out? That’s something really interesting…
Yes, It'd be worth the effort to try to get that business off the ground and mitigate the physical challenges, but at the end of the day, if it doesn't work, you're still left with being a carpenter.
 

FrancisK

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Yes, It'd be worth the effort to try to get that business off the ground and mitigate the physical challenges, but at the end of the day, if it doesn't work, you're still left with being a carpenter.

I see so it’s more about security, you would rather not take risks and instead possibly have less but also have less of a chance to fail. Nothing wrong with that, everyone wants different things out of life.

For me personally my mindset is you have to try, even if you fail you have to try and you have to keep trying. Every successful person I know has failed more than he has succeeded but they kept trying which is why they became successful. The ones that gave up and stopped trying or settled are just barely getting by or not getting by.


Totally off topic but different trains of thoughts on this forum beyond the politics and social decay has always fascinated me I’ve never seen anything like it, so many different perspectives from so many different walks of life but still all good strong conservative men trying to walk a good path. I really like the discussion a lot where it’s not just all doom and gloom or an echo chamber. Although is it an echo chamber if we’re right about what we’re echoing? Haha
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I see so it’s more about security, you would rather not take risks and instead possibly have less but also have less of a chance to fail. Nothing wrong with that, everyone wants different things out of life.
I just want a trade that doesn't have too many stipulations in the long-run. Don't want to have to be a carpenter and a small business owner for it to work out in the long-run. If I find something more suitable, I could still turn it into a small business, and that may actually be the best option, but there wouldn't be a necessity.

Who knows, I may still end up doing carpentry. Everything is under consideration right now. Thanks for the input.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
Two trades I work closely with on a weekly basis where the guys make good money are lighting & irrigation and lawn applicators.

These guys don't only generate their own clients but they also reach out to landscape design/build and maintenance companies and do it for their clients as subs.

Masonry is another trade in incredibly high demand. If you learn the field you can hire/train some laborers to do the brunt of the physical work and you sell/design/source/supervise. A simple patio runs 15-20K minimum here.
 
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fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Two trades I work closely with on a weekly basis where the guys make good money are lighting & irrigation and lawn applicators.
Thanks for the suggestions. I have some formal training and background working in photography and videography, so lighting would be a natural transition for me. Will look into that.
 
My two cents: right now might be one the best times ever to be looking for a job. The employment market across all sectors seems to be red hot. Why? There are simply a lot of people who have left the labor market for some kind of regular stimmy check. This has generated holes in the labor force across the board in trades, white collar and services. Companies from meat packing to clothing are trying to ramp up production across the board to meet backlogged demand and finding it very tough without people.

Skilled trades are a three - four year commitment but are definitely a good route. Most careers however, take about 3-5 years of learning to become truly proficient (the trades are more formal in their process however). Also, one is forced to learn a lot of transferable skills in the trades and move onto other things like management, project management, estimating, inspection, safety etc. Trades teach precision, good habits, planning, patience, problem solving - all very valuable skills to have in any job and tend not to be the focus of a business school either (many new graduates are deficient in many of these key attributes).

If you can sell, there is always a job - selling cars, boats, RVs, houses, nuts, bolts etc. All of it needs selling. I have worked in both trades (welding / fabrication) and sales (heavy equipment). I transitioned over, worked hard and now manage several business units of sales and trades people. One thing I know is that just about anywhere in the country a sober, clean cut guy willing to work hard can get a decent paycheck right now.

It all starts with a good resume and cover letter for each job that you apply to. Every time that you apply, your resume AND cover letter should be written to reflect the company and skillset required for the job. This means tweaking both documents for every single job application. This is not a small amount of work but it sets you apart from other applicants. Standing out among the crowd is important when a desirable job could have hundreds of applications. Also, you need a linked in profile to go along with the resume. Also, regular education - even free education online is fine. Even just reading books. There is lots of valuable free education to be had.

PM me if you need a leg up in a certain market and maybe I can help.
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Maybe some trades aren't so hot...There's quite a lot of complaining about various trades in the comments, even from experienced people. That said, I don't think one should ignore trades as an opportunity. I think it's more of a question of which trade should one pick because in this market they are not all equal.

The other thing I see from reading the comments: Wages are not keeping up with cost of living...at all...

 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
After considerable research into the trades, the one that looks the most suitable to me, and the best overall is certified building inspector. Barring any major unforeseen issues, I've decided to pursue this career.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
After considerable research into the trades, the one that looks the most suitable to me, and the best overall is certified building inspector. Barring any major unforeseen issues, I've decided to pursue this career.
Seems like it might be hard to get into that field. Do you know someone you're going to apprentice with? Or just take the courses and make it on your own?
 
It's all about supply and demand, having skills that are in demand. If you are trying to get work that anyone can do, then the differentiating factor is work ethic and soft skills

As your skill set increases, your work ethic and soft skills don't have to be quite as sharp, cuz you've got the skills that are in demand.

Developing skills is a function of time and effort.

Ergo: get moving and keep your nose to the grindstone
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Seems like it might be hard to get into that field. Do you know someone you're going to apprentice with? Or just take the courses and make it on your own?
I can't say for sure if it's easy or difficult to get into based on what I know right now. I've started a bit of networking here and there and I see there are lots of random temporary jobs for independent contractors, some requiring certs that aren't as difficult to obtain as others. For a full-time position it could be a very different story.

Looks like it will come down to your level of dedication and commitment and what you want out of the job. Do you want it to be an occasional side gig, or do you want to pursue formal training and the most difficult and comprehensive certs and get a job with the local government?

I live less than 2 miles away from a community college that offers an associate's degree in construction inspection, but I see that others just go directly for the certs through self-study. I do have regulatory experience (U.S. Coast Guard) and already have some idea what this job would be like. It's just in a totally different industry that I don't have very much direct experience in.
 

Caractacus Potts

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Check out the International Union of Elevator Constructors (IUEC). The elevator guys have two pay rates - straight pay and triple time! It was always a very closed and nepotistic field. Your dad or uncle or brother had to get you in. They have opened up a bit but it is still really tough to get in.

They opened the books ,i.e., the apprenticeship program, in my city a few months ago for the first time in years. The website crashed in eight minutes because so many people were trying to register! A guy in the know told me if I knew anyone who wanted to get in they should move to Nashville and go through the apprentice program there. After you've worked there and got your card you can work anywhere in the US.

The big companies are OTIS, Schindler, Thyssen Krup, Kone. Do some research on them and see what you can find. There are guys that do install and guys that do service work. You will be everybody's best friend when you show up to repair an out of service elevator. Service guys usually get a take home vehicle too. If you don't early morning starts (before tenants show up at buildings) you can make good coin. Good luck.
 

Caractacus Potts

Woodpecker
Gold Member
You should also check out infusion pump repair. Anybody who is in the hospital and is being fed via a g-tube or having meds infused is on one. Hospitals, nursing homes, dialysis centers - they all use them and they all break. Plus, they have to be screened and pm'ed on a regular schedule per the department of public health.

I know a retired guy who is making close to $100K doing this in a large city working three (long) days per week. He sets his own hours. He could work more (and the hospital staff want him to) but he doesn't want to pick up another location. He told me that there was a younger guy doing what he was doing but got pissy and walked out. After that they had him driving between two states doing service calls. He said no more or I quit. They finally found someone but he said they struggled. Depending on how my career goes I may look into doing it when I retire.
 
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