Archery thread

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
I searched and doesn’t look like there is one already.

My daughter (and son when he’s grown) are getting into archery to eventually hunt deer with. Specifically, traditional archery, not the modern compound bows. Ordered a Samick Sage last night in a 35 lbs draw after looking at several reviews. Figured that once my form is good enough, I could either get heavier limbs, or a heavier bow and pass this one on to my children.


I’ve had a compound bow before, but never got a chance to hunt with it.

I guess my main questions would be regarding the kind of arrows to get.

I also need to get my daughter a heavier bow. I bet she can pull 20 lbs now at 9 years old.

So, yeah this thread is to facilitate archery and bow hunting discussions.
 
I’m a heretical crossbow owner and have just started scratching the surface of both compound & recurve bows for hunting. Good to hear you are getting your children into the sport.

How long have you been shooting your bow? Did you need a lot of practice to become decent? Do you notice a big difference between your compound and this one?
 

BasilSeal

Sparrow
Are you a member of any sportsman's clubs? They often offer periodic instruction for most shooting sports, including for kids. Some also have JOAD affiliation (Junior Olympic Archery Development) which is a cool thing. I'd start there and you're sure to get plenty of advice. Note that many clubs are full with waiting lists. If you find one accepting members I would say consider yourself lucky and do not hesitate.

Good luck that's a great sport for any age, to steady mind and body.
 

Joseph.b

Chicken
This is reminding me to practice with my recurve bow. I've never bothered to learn properly because I have a hunting rifle, but in Australia I can't be sure how long they'll let me keep that, and a bow has many benefits regarding privacy and noise
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
I searched and doesn’t look like there is one already.

My daughter (and son when he’s grown) are getting into archery to eventually hunt deer with. Specifically, traditional archery, not the modern compound bows. Ordered a Samick Sage last night in a 35 lbs draw after looking at several reviews. Figured that once my form is good enough, I could either get heavier limbs, or a heavier bow and pass this one on to my children.


I’ve had a compound bow before, but never got a chance to hunt with it.

I guess my main questions would be regarding the kind of arrows to get.

I also need to get my daughter a heavier bow. I bet she can pull 20 lbs now at 9 years old.

So, yeah this thread is to facilitate archery and bow hunting discussions.
Good topic.

Could a newbie learn fairly well on their own or would paying for lessons be necessary?

I enjoy learning some things on my own, but wouldn't want to get in over my head.

I have a feeling there will come a day when I'll NEED a bow.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
I’m a heretical crossbow owner and have just started scratching the surface of both compound & recurve bows for hunting. Good to hear you are getting your children into the sport.

How long have you been shooting your bow? Did you need a lot of practice to become decent? Do you notice a big difference between your compound and this one?

I’m a complete noob...sort of. I only was able to work on my form with the BowTech compound before trading it for a rifle. That’s part of why I started this thread to get some of the fellas in the know to chime in.

I’ve just been watching YT vids on the subject. I’m all theory, no practice.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
Good topic.

Could a newbie learn fairly well on their own or would paying for lessons be necessary?

I enjoy learning some things on my own, but wouldn't want to get in over my head.

I have a feeling there will come a day when I'll NEED a bow.
I’ve just been learning on my own, plus it helps having people around that know a thing or two. But, yeah I would look into a decent recurve. I’m not a good source for archery info, but here’s a vid that would get you in the ballpark:


The rest is up to you. I was leaning towards the Black Hunter, but ended up with the Samick Sage. Find an archery range nearest you, get some practice arrows, and go for it. Same rules as a gun range applies at the archery range.
 

Solitarius

Sparrow
Good topic.

Could a newbie learn fairly well on their own or would paying for lessons be necessary?

I enjoy learning some things on my own, but wouldn't want to get in over my head.

I have a feeling there will come a day when I'll NEED a bow.
I might be wrong but I think you could probably learn to shoot fairly well simply by practising intensively. Shoot every day at different sized targets at different & unknown distances until you can shoot & hit without thinking, this is what the Indians did.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
Some things I’ve learned so far:

- always lowball your draw weight. Just because you can bench your body weight doesn’t mean you should get a 70 lbs draw weight. Noobs should start off with around 30-35 lbs bows.

- traditional archery is way harder than modern compound archery.

- depending on the model of recurve bow, some have predrilled and tapped holes to attach modern accessories like sights or whisker biscuits.

- if you’re shooting off the shelf, many archers recommend using actual feather fletched arrows because the feathers will fold under the arrow when shot off the shelf. Plastic fletching will not fold under the shelf and your shot can be compromised.

- definitely get an arm guard because string slap is real.

- also get a glove for the drawing hand because the sting will dig into your fingers.

- good arrows are expensive. Get plenty of cheap practice arrows. Save the good arrows for the hunt.

- this is an expensive hobby/tool. Lots of practice recommend, but being able to climb a tree and bring down a deer with it and provide your family with meat is a very primal accomplishment.

- once your shooting is good enough, learn how to gut/butcher a deer.

These are just reminders for myself and anyone else who’s interested.
 
Long-time bowhunter, here. I use a Hoyt compound bow. I am not denigrating traditional recurve bows, but if you want to bow hunt as a serious way to provide meat for the table, compound or crossbow is the way to go. The folks I know, that shoot recurves, do it for a sense of accomplishment, since shooting a recurve is considerably harder. Some of those folks even build their own recurves. Here are some things I have learned, with regard to hunting with a compound. FWIW, I have killed many deer, hogs, and varmints.

1. Golf and archery have a lot in common. In golf, some players will upgrade equipment every couple of years, in a chase to upgrade their game. So, good, used golf clubs are readily available. Same thing with archery. I have seen guy upgrade to the latest and greatest bows on the market, nearly every year. Top-of-the-line compounds, completely outfitted, easily run north of $1500. There are tons of good used bows available at half the cost. I have never had a new compound.

2. Like someone has already mentioned, there is no need to max-out the draw weight. It is more important to be accurate. I know of several women that kill deer, using a 45 lb. setup. When hunting, it is more important to be able to quietly/efficiently draw the bow, then be able to hold it steady for at least 60 seconds. Trust me, when you are staring at a target buck, with adrenaline flowing, making a smooth draw and holding it is harder than you think.

3. Broad heads. I use a simple, fixed 3-blade, that weighs 125 grains. The longest track I have ever done, was just 200 yards. Nearly all the rest, were less than 75 yards. Find what you like, then stick with it. When you change the type of blade you use, you have to re-tune your bow. Keep the blades sharp.

4. Rests and sights. I have used whisker biscuits and fall-away rests. I like both, but the whisker biscuit is simpler. For sights, the options are single-pin or multi-pin. I have a multi-pin sight, but I only use one pin. I am pretty conservative, and I have never taken a shot more than 25 yards. With modern bows and practice, you can hit anything within 25 yards, using a single-pin

5. Practice, practice, practice. I am lucky to have a 20 yard range, in my backyard. I also have access to an archery range, which is a lot of fun, and a great way to meet people. I hunt from tree stands, so I practice at elevated heights. Keep that in mind.

6. There are some good archery related forums on the internet. Archery Talk is popular. Personally, I have been a member of the Texas Bow hunter Forum, for years. I learned a lot, there. They have a sub-forum, dedicated to equipment and tuning, with lots of good info. https://discussions.texasbowhunter.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=46

7. Never dry-fire a compound bow!!! Never let anyone draw your bow, if they might dry fire it. Do a search dry-fire bow, and you will see the results. Here is an example, and the guy is lucky that he did not get hurt.
 

BasilSeal

Sparrow
7. Never dry-fire a compound bow!!! Never let anyone draw your bow, if they might dry fire it. Do a search dry-fire bow, and you will see the results. Here is an example, and the guy is lucky that he did not get hurt.

Great post and also excellent advice that should be #1. The same is true, to the best of my knowledge, with any bow. Crossbow, recurve, etc...
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
Long-time bowhunter, here. I use a Hoyt compound bow. I am not denigrating traditional recurve bows, but if you want to bow hunt as a serious way to provide meat for the table, compound or crossbow is the way to go. The folks I know, that shoot recurves, do it for a sense of accomplishment, since shooting a recurve is considerably harder. Some of those folks even build their own recurves. Here are some things I have learned, with regard to hunting with a compound. FWIW, I have killed many deer, hogs, and varmints.

1. Golf and archery have a lot in common. In golf, some players will upgrade equipment every couple of years, in a chase to upgrade their game. So, good, used golf clubs are readily available. Same thing with archery. I have seen guy upgrade to the latest and greatest bows on the market, nearly every year. Top-of-the-line compounds, completely outfitted, easily run north of $1500. There are tons of good used bows available at half the cost. I have never had a new compound.

2. Like someone has already mentioned, there is no need to max-out the draw weight. It is more important to be accurate. I know of several women that kill deer, using a 45 lb. setup. When hunting, it is more important to be able to quietly/efficiently draw the bow, then be able to hold it steady for at least 60 seconds. Trust me, when you are staring at a target buck, with adrenaline flowing, making a smooth draw and holding it is harder than you think.

3. Broad heads. I use a simple, fixed 3-blade, that weighs 125 grains. The longest track I have ever done, was just 200 yards. Nearly all the rest, were less than 75 yards. Find what you like, then stick with it. When you change the type of blade you use, you have to re-tune your bow. Keep the blades sharp.

4. Rests and sights. I have used whisker biscuits and fall-away rests. I like both, but the whisker biscuit is simpler. For sights, the options are single-pin or multi-pin. I have a multi-pin sight, but I only use one pin. I am pretty conservative, and I have never taken a shot more than 25 yards. With modern bows and practice, you can hit anything within 25 yards, using a single-pin

5. Practice, practice, practice. I am lucky to have a 20 yard range, in my backyard. I also have access to an archery range, which is a lot of fun, and a great way to meet people. I hunt from tree stands, so I practice at elevated heights. Keep that in mind.

6. There are some good archery related forums on the internet. Archery Talk is popular. Personally, I have been a member of the Texas Bow hunter Forum, for years. I learned a lot, there. They have a sub-forum, dedicated to equipment and tuning, with lots of good info. https://discussions.texasbowhunter.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=46

7. Never dry-fire a compound bow!!! Never let anyone draw your bow, if they might dry fire it. Do a search dry-fire bow, and you will see the results. Here is an example, and the guy is lucky that he did not get hurt.
This is the kind of info I started this thread for.

I guess my main issue is that I don’t want to go hunting for parts on a compound in case I do make that mistake. Too many moving parts in case of SHTF.

I do appreciate your post and will take into consideration a compound in case I see a nice one come up locally (West by-God Virginia) which isn’t too hard to do. I had the BowTech Destroyer at one point and it was outstanding, had all the bells and whistles. Unfortunately, I had to get rid of it before I could even hunt with it.

I just put my take-down recurve together, and yeah it’s going to take some practice to be able to hold 35lbs steady, so I ought to be concerned with form and just putting the arrow where I’m aiming. I want to try instinctive aiming before putting a hunting sight on it.

Anyways, I thought this was informative:
 
This is the kind of info I started this thread for.

I guess my main issue is that I don’t want to go hunting for parts on a compound in case I do make that mistake. Too many moving parts in case of SHTF.

I do appreciate your post and will take into consideration a compound in case I see a nice one come up locally (West by-God Virginia) which isn’t too hard to do. I had the BowTech Destroyer at one point and it was outstanding, had all the bells and whistles. Unfortunately, I had to get rid of it before I could even hunt with it.

I just put my take-down recurve together, and yeah it’s going to take some practice to be able to hold 35lbs steady, so I ought to be concerned with form and just putting the arrow where I’m aiming. I want to try instinctive aiming before putting a hunting sight on it.

Anyways, I thought this was informative:

I never thought about trying to find parts for a compound in a SHTF scenario. I know a lot of serious bowhunters (i.e. never use a gun) keep a backup bow, just in case something happens to their primary bow. If something seriously malfunctions, it might take a bow shop a couple of weeks to get it fixed.

In a SHTF scenario, are you willing to trade the accuracy/power of a compound to the accuracy/power of a recurve? The reason I ask it that with a compound, your success rate would probably be higher than with a recurve. I shot a 48 lb. Ben Pearson recurve, when I was a kid. I shot it a lot, but could never get better than 8" groups, at 15 yards. I did not have any sights, though.

With my first compound bow, I was getting 2" groups, at 20 yards, in less than two weeks.

Slightly off-topic, but here is the story of my first deer with a compound bow. A doe and yearling buck were in my feeder pin. I was in a treestand, about 12 yards from the doe, and about 14' up. I drew on the doe, and released the arrow. I saw the arrow hit the ground, between the doe's feet. How did I miss, for that easy of a shot??? The doe ran off, with no blood. The yearling stayed in the pen, continuing to eat. I sitting there trying to figure out what happened. As I was thinking, the yearling started walking around my arrow, that was on the ground in the pen. Then I noticed my arrow started to disappear, as the yearling was kicking dirt over it. After 15 minutes, I climb down to retrieve my arrow. It was covered in blood and dirt. I did not miss. I got a pass through so fast, that I did not see the arrow hit the doe. I started tracking the doe. No blood where she jumped out of the pen. Kept walking, at at 40 yards a big blood pool. Ten more yards, and there she was.

I have always been amazed at the power of a compound. All of my deer have been pass throughs, but I am pretty conservative with my shot choices. Some hogs have been pass throughs, but most were not.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
I never thought about trying to find parts for a compound in a SHTF scenario. I know a lot of serious bowhunters (i.e. never use a gun) keep a backup bow, just in case something happens to their primary bow. If something seriously malfunctions, it might take a bow shop a couple of weeks to get it fixed.

In a SHTF scenario, are you willing to trade the accuracy/power of a compound to the accuracy/power of a recurve? The reason I ask it that with a compound, your success rate would probably be higher than with a recurve. I shot a 48 lb. Ben Pearson recurve, when I was a kid. I shot it a lot, but could never get better than 8" groups, at 15 yards. I did not have any sights, though.

With my first compound bow, I was getting 2" groups, at 20 yards, in less than two weeks.

Slightly off-topic, but here is the story of my first deer with a compound bow. A doe and yearling buck were in my feeder pin. I was in a treestand, about 12 yards from the doe, and about 14' up. I drew on the doe, and released the arrow. I saw the arrow hit the ground, between the doe's feet. How did I miss, for that easy of a shot??? The doe ran off, with no blood. The yearling stayed in the pen, continuing to eat. I sitting there trying to figure out what happened. As I was thinking, the yearling started walking around my arrow, that was on the ground in the pen. Then I noticed my arrow started to disappear, as the yearling was kicking dirt over it. After 15 minutes, I climb down to retrieve my arrow. It was covered in blood and dirt. I did not miss. I got a pass through so fast, that I did not see the arrow hit the doe. I started tracking the doe. No blood where she jumped out of the pen. Kept walking, at at 40 yards a big blood pool. Ten more yards, and there she was.

I have always been amazed at the power of a compound. All of my deer have been pass throughs, but I am pretty conservative with my shot choices. Some hogs have been pass throughs, but most were not.

Awesome story. Compounds for sure have way more FPS potential than a recurve. It’s funny what you said about your groupings because that’s what I’ve heard as well. With a recurve your groups tend to be larger, but that’s normal for a recurve because there’s so many variables. With a compound, if your arrows aren’t hitting within 2” of each other, it’s shooter error.
 
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