Archery thread

DeWoken

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
A friend tried to get me into primitive/traditional archery a few years back, somewhat succeeding. Many cultures traditionally revere the bow. Choosing the compound instead of the traditional bow seems like a missed opportunity to learn something about your roots.

As Roger Scruton might have said: without form, function also fails.

In a survival situation a compound bow might seem like the ticket, but then rifles are pretty darn handy in that respect! If you're injured, your wife or your teenage son could effectively hunt with the right rifle and minimal training, whereas a compound would take more training.

One aspect of traditional archery that is absent from compound bow shooting is the archer's paradox. (So arrows made of wood are probably best).

Traditional bows don't have sights. I've heard people say that you sort of feel the aim, you aim with your body. There are many variables to keep track of, and I never got that good at it. One tip I've heard - contrary to hunting advice above - is that you shouldn't hold a drawn arrow for more than a few seconds. Maybe it's different for hunting - I'm not sure.

Also, not all traditional bows are recurves. The recurve is a highly advantageous design feature that minimizes shock (recoil) and maximizes efficiency, if I recall correctly. But they are harder to build, obviously.

If you have the time, tools, facilities and a decent amount of patience I recommend trying to make a bow. There is the four-part series titled The Bowyer's Bible on the state of the art of making bows. Then there's Comstock's The Bent Stick which is a good short primer. I'm sure there is a ton of good video information out there nowadays. One key piece of information is that many different types of hardwood are excellent for making bows, not just yew and ash wood, the way folk wisdom might have you believe.
 
Choosing the compound instead of the traditional bow seems like a missed opportunity to learn something about your roots.
You clearly know a lot about archery, but that statement does not make sense to me. I believe in the greatness of Western Civilization, and my forefathers that that promoted it. Bow and arrows are not part of my legacy. Guns, property ownership, and fighting for liberty, are.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
Archery is still revered in my mother’s home of Japan. There’s Kyudo, which is basically meditation via archery, and then there’s Yabusame, horseback archery. They have to hit three targets while atop a horse at full gallop in 12 seconds.


The Japanese bow or “yumi” (pronounced “You me”) is an interesting design. It’s easily taller than most bows at around 6’ tall, and the string is drawn at the lower third of the bow. They do this because apparently vibration is significantly reduced, or something.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
You clearly know a lot about archery, but that statement does not make sense to me. I believe in the greatness of Western Civilization, and my forefathers that that promoted it. Bow and arrows are not part of my legacy. Guns, property ownership, and fighting for liberty, are.
Actually, bows and arrows and guns and property rights (and the Bible), are very probably all part of your legacy, if you're a typical Texan.
I mean, before inventing guns, our European ancestors used bows and arrows, among other military weaponry. Sadly, for example, the English once defeated a great French army, through the (rather treacherous) systematic use of big bows.

The catastrophic battle of Azincourt, which decimated many great Christian lineages, for no clear benefit to even the English :
 
Last edited:

DeWoken

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Thanks, @Going strong, Agincourt was my first thought as well :)

If you have the time, tools, facilities and a decent amount of patience I recommend trying to make a bow.
Okay maybe I oversold the importance a little. I'm just saying, more or less it is part of everyone's heritage, and you don't have to be an expert woodworker to make your own usable bow.

I wouldn't mind owning a compound bow, it would be useful in certain situations, but I think there is beauty in traditional archery as well as utility.
and the string is drawn at the lower third of the bow. They do this because apparently vibration is significantly reduced, or something.
I wondered why they did it that way. The shock can be annoying - that's part of the challenge of making a good bow, mitigating shock.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
I wondered why they did it that way. The shock can be annoying - that's part of the challenge of making a good bow, mitigating shock.
I found a video that explains the science behind it. It’s amazing that people were able to figure this stuff out before modern science.

 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
Spent an hour at the range with this being my best group. No sights, and the string hasn’t even been nocked yet. Will eventually get a three pin sight. Arrows are 600/125 Black Eagle Vintage. C7499856-9032-44A8-B41F-18A7BBE7CBA3.jpeg
 
Glad to see a lot of trad archers, here. That takes a lot of work. Based on the pics and videos, you guy are shooting wood-shaft arrows, while being trad. The unknown/inconsistent spline across arrows adds more to the work of tuning/grouping.

I guess, I am just lazy, so I hunt with a compound bow, with fiber carbon arrows, with known spline. I have five, one-inch targets spots, on my target block. I shoot five arrow groups, with each arrow aimed at a different spot. Robinhoods or near Robinhoods are expensive. I am not knocking the trad guys, and I am not bragging. Shooting modern compounds are just easier.

Back to the OP's original post, and a question about recurves being reliable, in a SHTF scenario, versus compounds. My suggestion was to have a backup bow.

Funny, the question for need of a backup bow, came up on the Texas Bowunter forum, today. The responses are mixed, but this one caught my eye.

u shouldnt consider it a backup bow so much as u should bow#1 and #2....
if you are like most of us you most likely dont have gun and backup gun. A prepper once told me "one is none and 2 is 1"....i have more than 1 pistol, rifle, shotgun, and bow.
Granted they are in different calibers and or gauges. but nonetheless


Here is the thread, if anyone is interested.

https://discussions.texasbowhunter.com/forums/showthread.php?t=825053
 

DeWoken

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I shoot five arrow groups, with each arrow aimed at a different spot. Robinhoods or near Robinhoods are expensive.
That's a good idea. My nephew kept asking about Robinhoods and I laughed and said that only happens in movies. The next day I get one with him watching :laughter: It was a primitive bow, shot from 30', with wooden arrows.
My suggestion was to have a backup bow.
Pretty much this eh. The same goes for many things.
 
Justin,
Have you thought about using a release and a d-loop, or is that forbidden in trad? The reason I ask, is that it looks like your draw is a little short. A release would allow your right arm to go back another couple of inches, then bring the string/sight closer to you face. Your head is tilted to meet the string, instead of having a straight spine and square shoulders, to shoot from.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
I’ve got a sight on the way so I’m not above using modern conveniences on a trad bow. Lilly uses a release on hers.
I’ll try to draw back further, but I’ve heard guys say your anchor point should be around the corner of your mouth and that’s where I’m at now.

My head tilt might have to do with canting the bow slightly. I guess it’s common with trad bows.

 
Notice the Lily's acorn point is still the corner of her mouth, but her arms and shoulders are nearly strait, and her spine is straight. Pretty squared away, in my opinion. I think if you can get squared away, the dropping of your left arm on release would nearly go away.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
Notice the Lily's acorn point is still the corner of her mouth, but her arms and shoulders are nearly strait, and her spine is straight. Pretty squared away, in my opinion. I think if you can get squared away, the dropping of your left arm on release would nearly go away.
I’ll look into a release and tying a d-loop. I had a pretty nice release before. Forgot what brand it was, but it was supposed to be one of the better ones.
 
I’ll look into a release and tying a d-loop. I had a pretty nice release before. Forgot what brand it was, but it was supposed to be one of the better ones.

Do you have a peep sight, with or without pins? If you don't, then placing the d-loop on your string will be just guess work. Don't go cheap on releases. They are triggers, and misfires/accidental fires are dangerous. I use Curtis releases. Not cheap, but good.
 

Cavalier

Robin
Orthodox Catechumen
You clearly know a lot about archery, but that statement does not make sense to me. I believe in the greatness of Western Civilization, and my forefathers that that promoted it. Bow and arrows are not part of my legacy. Guns, property ownership, and fighting for liberty, are.
So the famously skilled English long bowmen are not part of Western Civilization‘s history??
 

Cavalier

Robin
Orthodox Catechumen
I s
A friend tried to get me into primitive/traditional archery a few years back, somewhat succeeding. Many cultures traditionally revere the bow. Choosing the compound instead of the traditional bow seems like a missed opportunity to learn something about your roots.

As Roger Scruton might have said: without form, function also fails.

In a survival situation a compound bow might seem like the ticket, but then rifles are pretty darn handy in that respect! If you're injured, your wife or your teenage son could effectively hunt with the right rifle and minimal training, whereas a compound would take more training.

One aspect of traditional archery that is absent from compound bow shooting is the archer's paradox. (So arrows made of wood are probably best).

Traditional bows don't have sights. I've heard people say that you sort of feel the aim, you aim with your body. There are many variables to keep track of, and I never got that good at it. One tip I've heard - contrary to hunting advice above - is that you shouldn't hold a drawn arrow for more than a few seconds. Maybe it's different for hunting - I'm not sure.

Also, not all traditional bows are recurves. The recurve is a highly advantageous design feature that minimizes shock (recoil) and maximizes efficiency, if I recall correctly. But they are harder to build, obviously.

If you have the time, tools, facilities and a decent amount of patience I recommend trying to make a bow. There is the four-part series titled The Bowyer's Bible on the state of the art of making bows. Then there's Comstock's The Bent Stick which is a good short primer. I'm sure there is a ton of good video information out there nowadays. One key piece of information is that many different types of hardwood are excellent for making bows, not just yew and ash wood, the way folk wisdom might have you believe.
I shoot both longbow and recurve. I don’t use sights. Through practice I developed a feel for shooting the arrow at a target similar to throwing a ball. This allows for shooting at targets at multiple distances without aiming very quickly. I am accurate out to 35yds currently but have hit targets at 100yds but maybe 1 out of 10. Since you don’t aim there is no need or advantage to holding the arrow cocked. I just look at the target then draw and release.
 

JustinHS

Sparrow
Orthodox
So, I’m keeping my back straight and shoulders back while canting the bow. Shooting high now, and will take some time to get used to, but it feels better and tightens up my back.

Apparently, I’ve been gap shooting without knowing it, but incorrectly because the way I was shooting was to imagine where a hunting sight would be and putting the target there, instead of knowing what my actual gaps were.

 
Top