Are most mechanics rip-offs?

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I feel bad for mechanics though. This (((electric car)))) nonsense will be the death of mechanic shops, muffler shops, mom and pop auto tire stores, etc.

These things aren’t made to get worked on. 10 years tops and they get (((recycled)))

Electric cars still have suspensions to fix, brake pads to replace, tires to balance, steering, windows that will not roll up, air conditioners that break, crash damage to deal with, etc., and mechanics can work on those items. At some point I expect that mechanics will start doing more with them as they become more common. A problem though is that because electric cars put out pollution at the power plant instead of out of a tail pipe, they are exempt from having an ODBC port and such and they can keep a lot of maintenance items secret. A money making opportunity would be to reverse engineer them for mechanics references.

At some point, it seems like lithium could become scarce and expensive, and people may not like electric cars once the batteries start decaying. My car will be 18 years old this June. Everything works, it drives well, and gets ~32 MPG. Doubt many electric cars that would cost twice as much new will be making the same claim. Plus, I drove it on a 620 mile round trip a couple of weekends ago. Stopped for gas once. And that was through some really sparsely populated areas in the south west. Can not see doing that with an electric car. Way back when, turbine engines were the future, then the Wankel engine, then if we were smart we would switch to diesels, and now it vehicles using lithium--that the world may run out of. I think gasolene engines will be around for a while yet.

I think some of the Earth-worshipers know that there is not a much sustainable about strip mining South America for lithium--the plan is to ban internal combustion, but we can go to electric cars!, then when lithium is prohibitively expensive, well, guess you can ride all that mass transit they have been pushing, and no cars for anyone but the environmentally exempt rich and famous as they roll off to their next conference on what to take away from the peasants.
 
I think that if the guy does a honest good job then he deserves to make good money by servicing cars. It is a man's job and it should be prized with money that makes him able to maintain a family.

Yes, it is expensive to finance on your side. I guess the SAAB turbo requires some high level oil and stuff that is expensive itself.

If it is too expensive for you then you should consider doing it yourself (and it is good idea for the fun and for the skills you learn) or you should keep a cheaper car. AFAIK the oil for low power naturally aspirated cars is much cheaper. You should check the estimated basic maintenance cost of your car before buying it. That is car ownership 101.

If you think it is a rip off then you should ask the car shop to show the price of the parts and work done detailed. Then you can check if you could get the parts cheaper or if you could do the work cheaper.
 
In Germany, if you know the mechanic and he is not part of some shop that is connected with a specific brand you will get away (very) cheaply. Additionally, like with a lot of craftsmen in Germany, if you display some interest and knowledge, they will charge you way less. My mechanic changed my oil for 10 Euro including the oil price. Don't know how he does it.
 
Electric cars still have suspensions to fix, brake pads to replace, tires to balance, steering, windows that will not roll up, air conditioners that break, crash damage to deal with, etc., and mechanics can work on those items. At some point I expect that mechanics will start doing more with them as they become more common. A problem though is that because electric cars put out pollution at the power plant instead of out of a tail pipe, they are exempt from having an ODBC port and such and they can keep a lot of maintenance items secret. A money making opportunity would be to reverse engineer them for mechanics references.

At some point, it seems like lithium could become scarce and expensive, and people may not like electric cars once the batteries start decaying. My car will be 18 years old this June. Everything works, it drives well, and gets ~32 MPG. Doubt many electric cars that would cost twice as much new will be making the same claim. Plus, I drove it on a 620 mile round trip a couple of weekends ago. Stopped for gas once. And that was through some really sparsely populated areas in the south west. Can not see doing that with an electric car. Way back when, turbine engines were the future, then the Wankel engine, then if we were smart we would switch to diesels, and now it vehicles using lithium--that the world may run out of. I think gasolene engines will be around for a while yet.

I think some of the Earth-worshipers know that there is not a much sustainable about strip mining South America for lithium--the plan is to ban internal combustion, but we can go to electric cars!, then when lithium is prohibitively expensive, well, guess you can ride all that mass transit they have been pushing, and no cars for anyone but the environmentally exempt rich and famous as they roll off to their next conference on what to take away from the peasants.
I agree with you on the lithium thing. That’ll probably be sooner than later.
mad far as fixing wreck damage I can see it being really easy to total an electric car.
cost vs value.
then you’ll just have to buy a new one. Which is what they want.
Among other things, the used car market will go the way of blockbuster video
 

Grow Bag

Woodpecker
Dealer mechanics are the worst offenders. Generally dealers are interested in moving vehicles and mechanical issues are just a headache, unless they can turn a quick profit. Independent mechanics are mostly cheaper and, because it's their bread and butter, do much better job. Best to get a older car or bike, without the new technology, and learning to service it yourself. I bought a fairly simple machine so I could do all of my own servicing. I never used to, I just made a decision to start doing to it and learning as I went. Now I'm always thinking, "what needs doing", as I enjoy tinkering.
 

MrFreezy

Pigeon
Cant say it often enough. Do it yourself. Doesn't have to be perfect. Sometimes you will fail. But you have to try. In this case YT is really a blessing. What they should really censor is not Alex Jones but all the DIY stuff. Especially with cars but with other stuff too. Don't borrow money from Mr Steinbergs (((Dealership))) for a new car. Buy used for cash and fix it yourself. Don't just consume stuff but build and fix it. Maintain it. Clothes the same, food the same. If you can. Roosh is baking his own bread, we don't because its too cheap where we live if you buy it on sale. But we make our own perogies, cook jams, pickle veggies. Started fishing last year. Almost all clothing second hand etc etc...
When it comes to cars one important aspect is the tools. That would be the real investment and time to look stuff up. And some stuff is not worth fixing of course but other than that time to send the "car doctors" into early retirement.
 

NoFunInAus

Kingfisher
I have to say thanks to all your replies as they make a lot of sense. I was actually thinking of selling the old girl but now have decided to take up the challenge and learn how to maintain and fix her.

The argument of "you'll loose time and career" doesn't really bode with me as I don't have a career lol, just a family and a house. So I've decided to do most myself, already have (had) a donor car and I like SAAB's, they're from a different era, I almost feel it's my duty.
 

“A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”​

- Robert A. Heinlein

Specialization is for people who live in a society that necessitates it. If we were all still hunter-gatherers, then yes, we could learn all the jobs in our village. But in modern society learning to do everything is impractical, and will preclude getting good at anything.

Learning to conn a ship, for instance, takes a military officer about a year of assisting at watch and constant studying. And even after passing the deck watch officer board, he is usually several years away from being really competent. And this whole time he's spending at least half his time at sea. Writing a decent sonnet probably takes even longer. No wonder Heinlein died childless.

Learn to be competent in the things you need to; your job, managing your money, being a reliable friend, etc. Then with whatever time you have left learn the things you want; languages, instruments, writing sonnets, etc. There is no need to learn everything.
 

Steiner

Sparrow
Specialization is for people who live in a society that necessitates it. If we were all still hunter-gatherers, then yes, we could learn all the jobs in our village. But in modern society learning to do everything is impractical, and will preclude getting good at anything.

Learning to conn a ship, for instance, takes a military officer about a year of assisting at watch and constant studying. And even after passing the deck watch officer board, he is usually several years away from being really competent. And this whole time he's spending at least half his time at sea. Writing a decent sonnet probably takes even longer. No wonder Heinlein died childless.

Learn to be competent in the things you need to; your job, managing your money, being a reliable friend, etc. Then with whatever time you have left learn the things you want; languages, instruments, writing sonnets, etc. There is no need to learn everything.
In any society learning "everything" is impractical. In human history learning "everything" is impractical. Heinlein's list is far from this everything that you are so heavily leaning on.

Please show me on the doll where Heinlein touched you. I find it very hard to believe you are taking this quote 100% literally. You really think Heinlein thought someone could master all of those skills in a lifetime?

You resent him for not having children, did you know his wife of 15 years ended up being infertile? They tried and consulted doctors but nothing could be done, by the time they had stopped trying they were too old to adopt. She turned to the bottle (like her father had done) and the marriage fell apart. I'm sure it all had to do with him being a renaissance man of sorts - sure :boring:

It's just a commentary on specialization. There's nothing wrong with learning new skills, you assume everyone that does is looking to learn everything, and shun their duties in the process. The quote merely illustrates a multitude of things you can learn. You even say it yourself, once you have your responsibilities tied down, go ahead and learn new skills. People are competent at their jobs and all the things you list, and still fritter away hours a day watching television or on their phone. You can learn many skills without sacrificing other parts of your life.

Such as: doing an oil change and replacing a worn belt on your car.
 

The_Trigg

Robin
I brought my pride and joy in (an old SAAB turbo) and the oil change + filter and general check over (it did need a power steering belt) cost me A$380,- and this is in a small town.

I remember bringing in cars for $120 services, and they would wash them, it wasn't washed.

They also told me if I wanted some other small things fixed I'd be looking for a 4(!) week wait, seem like they're brushing me off.

Am I totally out of touch or is this guy ripping me off?
Part of it may have to do with new car prices being higher now...and people deciding to hang on to their old cars, so demand for mechanic services goes up. Also, modern educational brainwashing system does not encourage people to pursue trades. Also juice banking system causing inflation.
 
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