Are vegetable oils safe to eat?

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
A relatively new creation, vegetable oil is suspected to be the cause of heart disease and diabetes. Great video...


Edit: Here's what I posted on my Gab about vegetable oils...

Have you taken the red pill on vegetable oil (seed oil)? After cheap petroleum replaced seed oils in the industrial production of paints and varnishes, they dumped the supply onto the food system, for both humans and livestock. Vegetable oils break down into toxic substances like aldehydes and carbonyls on the shelf or when you cook with them, and even if they enter your body intact, they react with existing free radicals to create oxidative chain reactions that cause cellular and molecular damage, leading to immunity problems, increased estrogen, heart disease, obesity, cancer, diabetes, blood clotting, malnourishment, and accelerated aging. Pigs and cows that are fed soy and corn have fat that is essentially like vegetable oil. The safest fats are olive, coconut, butter, and lard from grass-fed animals, but it's now impossible to avoid vegetable oils entirely. The best you can do is read ingredient labels, limit your consumption, and take the antioxidants Vitamin E or C after a fast-food meal full of soybean and canola oil. Unfortunately we've been poisoned for our entire lives.

Helpful links I've found in my research:






 
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Johnnyvee

Ostrich
Fresh cold-pressed olive oil would be the exception, but that`s not easy to come by. Even fancy expensive oils can often be rancid when you buy them. Small amounts of coconut oil is also acceptable. (Technically a nut I think?)
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
America's most widely consumed oil causes genetic changes in the brain. Soybean oil linked to metabolic and neurological changes in mice.
New UC Riverside research shows soybean oil not only leads to obesity and diabetes, but could also affect neurological conditions like autism, Alzheimer's disease, anxiety, and depression.

Used for fast food frying, added to packaged foods, and fed to livestock, soybean oil is by far the most widely produced and consumed edible oil in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In all likelihood, it is not healthy for humans.
It certainly is not good for mice. The new study, published this month in the journal Endocrinology, compared mice fed three different diets high in fat: soybean oil, soybean oil modified to be low in linoleic acid, and coconut oil.
The same UCR research team found in 2015 that soybean oil induces obesity, diabetes, insulin resistance, and fatty liver in mice. Then in a 2017 study, the same group learned that if soybean oil is engineered to be low in linoleic acid, it induces less obesity and insulin resistance.
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I try to avoid vegetable oil––that was one good thing I learned from Ray Peat. I only use coconut oil, butter, and olive oil. I'm not a zealot about it though, like people on that forum who avoid everything from seeds and nuts to olive oil, avocado, and salmon, because of the PUFA content. I think, as Mark Sisson says, it's really a ratio problem between omega 6 versus omega 3 fatty acids. Most people get way too much omega 6, do not get enough omega 3's, and avoid saturated fats when in fact saturated fat is protective against oxidized PUFA.

Anecdotally, when my omega 6 is high, I store fat very easily. Ray Peat claims it is a toxin so the body will burn up everything else around it before burning off those fats, since it will cause inflammation as you do so. So saturated fat can be a good weight loss mechanism since it will neutralize the PUFA.

From Peat universe, Vitamin E is often noted as the most helpful anti-PUFA antidote.
 
Sunflower is a good, inexpensive and readily available alternative. It tolerates high heat as well.
Anything not good enough for my high end olive oil (such as cleaning the grill, frying fish while camping, etc.) gets sunflower.

Very mild taste so it won't interfere with the food.
 

Cartographer

Pelican
Gold Member
Beef tallow is a healthier option to replace some of the typical seed oils people use. Coconut oil seems to be good too. I don't really trust olive oil anymore. Duck fat would be my replacement suggestion for frying but it's pretty expensive. Ghee is pretty good too.

Once something becomes massively popular, who knows what they cut it with? Just printing a label with "100% pure" on it doesn't make it true. If there are legal or illegal ways to make more yield per unit I don't doubt they're being used.
 
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Handsome Creepy Eel

Owl
Gold Member
I eat only olive oil, with the sole rare exception when a food needs to be deep fried and the amount of olive oil used would be prohibitively expensive. In that case, sunflower oil is fine.

Olive oil is a healthy, traditional ingredient with local olive groves and presses dating back for millennia that you can visit, see and touch for yourself, it tastes great, it's light on the stomach, it has a stronger aroma and higher smoke point so you need to use less when cooking, and of course it's perfect for salads too. It's such a versatile ingredient that even plain bread with some salt and olive oil can make for a nice meal.

Note that European Union has an insane law that allows producers to muddle the origins of their olive oil by saying it's a "mixture of olive oils from EU area" instead of specifying the country of origin. I'm very suspicious of this, since it allows manufacturers to pollute their olive oil with artificially extracted press leftovers or low quality olives laundered by being transported from other countries, so I avoid those like hell even if they're cheaper.

Therefore, I'll only buy local olive oils sourced 100% from Dalmatia or Istria - anything else could be a fraud.

I'm not sure how things are in the USA, but olive oil production and import regulations are probably quite stupid there as well, so you have to really do your homework regarding country and/or region of origin, and I'm not sure how to feel about olive oils produced in the cesspit of big agriculture that is California. Just because it has a "similar" climate doesn't mean much, since olive quality is massively affected by soil quality and specific rainfall patterns.
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Nope. All unsaturated fats are not for human consumption. I am a huge Ray Peat fan and his information has changed my life.


Unsaturated fatty acids: Nutritionally essential, or toxic?
So you think olives, avocados, and wild salmon are poisonous? Peat may be correct about some things, but taken to the logical extreme it becomes absurd in my opinion.

Peat pretty much says you shouldn't lift weights or exercise due to the stress it induces and the fat it will oxidize. But he doesn't realize coffee liberates free fatty acids as well and he advocates drinking tons of coffee. It just doesn't make sense. One thing about Peat that I think he completely lacks understanding of is the principle of hormesis. The organism needs resistance and stress in small doses to get stronger and healthier. Even if that means some PUFA once in a while.

I remember one guy on Ray Peat Forum, his diet consisted of gummy bears (for gelatin and sugar), orange juice, fat-free milk, and aspirin. I'm not joking, a lot of people on that forum seem to think this type of diet is healthy.
 
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Grow Bag

Kingfisher
So you think olives, avocados, and wild salmon are poisonous? Peat may be correct about some things, but taken to the logical extreme it becomes absurd in my opinion.

Peat pretty much says you shouldn't lift weights or exercise due to the stress it induces and the fat it will oxidize. But he doesn't realize coffee liberates free fatty acids as well and he advocates drinking tons of coffee. It just doesn't make sense. One thing about Peat that I think he completely lacks understanding of is the principle of hormesis. The organism needs resistance and stress in small doses to get stronger and healthier. Even if that means some PUFA once in a while.

I remember one guy on Ray Peat Forum, his diet consisted of gummy bears (for gelatin and sugar), orange juice, fat-free milk, and aspirin. I'm not joking, a lot of people on that forum seem to think this type of diet is healthy.
The fact that Ray Peat got it so wrong about orange juice and sugar in general, which is obviously detrimental to metabolic health, pretty much scuppers his credibility. If he says we shouldn't be eating saturated fat, well that sinks the entire boat.
 
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soli.deo.gloria

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
A relatively new creation, vegetable oil is suspected to be the cause of heart disease and diabetes. Great video...

I'm about half way through the video. They are saying lipid/cholesterol level is tied to adverse outcome. It makes sense but I think that may be a red herring. My theory is that vegetable oils cause inflammation and that is what causes a lot of problems. Maybe that is the underlying mechanism that drives the inflammatory process though.
 
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The Beast1

Peacock
Gold Member
I avoid "vegetable" oil and hate its name. Call it what it is, soy bean oil.

I've replaced soy oil with canola in applications it is called for like baking. For everything else, I use olive, beef/pork tallow, butter/ghee, peanut oil (mmm), and sunflower.

I'm ashamed to also admit I love spray Pam. It's ingredients are pretty much sunflower, canola, and soy oil. Sometimes a spray oil is exactly what you need for making waffles.

I'll use crisco to season my cast iron. About the extent of my soy oil use.
 
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