Are vegetable oils safe to eat?

Koolking

Sparrow
A Ukrainian baker in my area gets his wheat from Canada. A pizza guy I know here gets his wheat from Italy. I understand most American farmers are having to use a lot of petrochemicals as the soil is getting depleted of nutrients and they are also cutting it much sooner than in other countries.
 

kel

Ostrich
I cook in olive oil, butter, coconut oil or duck fat...what would be the healthiest option? It makes no sense to use tem all and want to drop the least healthy ones.
IMO save olive oil for raw uses (salad dressing, dip for bread, etc). Butter is okay for cooking but burns at higher temperatures, so I'd err to the side of duck fat in general and ditch coconut oil, leaving the middle two for raw or raw-ish uses.
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
There are studies that show saturated fat causes temporary diabetes. While unsaturated fats do not. PUFA is burned off by the body quickly if you are active. E.g. arachidonic acid is used by the muscle and grows it.

Fatty red meat is high in arachidonic acid (PUFA).

A lot of Asian cultures use vegetable oils. Not saying they are the healthiest. But interesting nonetheless as they tend to do quite well in general.

PUFA is very bad for sedentary people because you will hold it in your fat. When stress hits you then your body releases a lot of it at once which can cause problems. For active people they will burn it up quick.
I'm not sure about the statement that saturated fat causes temporary diabetes. That sounds very wrong to me. MCT oil (like caprylic acid in coconut oil) is pure saturated fat and actually aids in weight loss as the body utilizes it immediately for fuel. It does not trigger the gallbladder to produce bile, it literally goes directly into the portal vein of the liver. It helps for fatty liver for this reason and definitely helps with diabetes.
 

Knight.of.Logos

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
I used to use sunflower oil but have found out it is pretty bad, maybe not as bad as soy oil or canola oil, but should be avoided.

I have heard peanut oil can be okay, but I would try to get organic sourced peanuts. Even for people without peanut allergies, peanuts are often not the easiest food to digest. Olive oil and coconut oil are much better. I also use grass fed butter and when I cook bacon I save the grease and cook my next meal in that (I always use uncured, pasture raised bacon). Broccoli in bacon fat is very delicious and even veggie haters should enjoy this one!

Healthy fat is important for diet. I've tried high fat diets like keto and paleo and I find that they require unnecessarily high amounts of fat and I felt a bit on edge in those states (may have to do more with ketosis). It is important to find a good balance and most importantly, use the right kind of fats.
 

Knight.of.Logos

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
IMO save olive oil for raw uses (salad dressing, dip for bread, etc). Butter is okay for cooking but burns at higher temperatures, so I'd err to the side of duck fat in general and ditch coconut oil, leaving the middle two for raw or raw-ish uses.
Coconut oil is great in my experience, although some people may have some sensitivity to it. I'd also use unrefined oil and not refined. Do you dislike it for health reasons or for taste reasons?

I agree that olive oil is best used raw. Coconut oil is great for cooking on fast days when I try to abstain from butter.
 

kel

Ostrich
Coconut oil is great in my experience, although some people may have some sensitivity to it. I'd also use unrefined oil and not refined. Do you dislike it for health reasons or for taste reasons?

I agree that olive oil is best used raw. Coconut oil is great for cooking on fast days when I try to abstain from butter.
I don't hate it, used to use it, I just prefer animal fats and I always have enough saved bacon grease and duck fat on hand to not really need to use other stuff. I've got a bunch of ghee I made many months ago still just sitting around because the bacon grease is just generally fine for my needs - I'll make some bacon in a cast iron and for the next couple meals I've got more than enough grease already there, no need for additional cooking fat, and then I'll probably make some more bacon and the cycle repeats.
 

Grow Bag

Kingfisher
I'm not sure about the statement that saturated fat causes temporary diabetes. That sounds very wrong to me. MCT oil (like caprylic acid in coconut oil) is pure saturated fat and actually aids in weight loss as the body utilizes it immediately for fuel. It does not trigger the gallbladder to produce bile, it literally goes directly into the portal vein of the liver. It helps for fatty liver for this reason and definitely helps with diabetes.
It is wrong. I have friend whose diabetes had led to him being catheterised and who was in danger of having organ failure. His dietitian had him on a high carbohydrate diet, which I knew was exacerbating his condition. At the time I was very familiar with the ketogenic diet and how it was beneficial for diabetics, so I started working on him, drip feeding information and giving him a book by Dr Bernstein who reversed his diabetes with a meat based, ketogenic diet. My friend decided to give it a try with amazing results. He skipped the potatoes, bread, pasta and just ate meat, eggs, butter, coconut oil with a few allowable veges. He was able to gradually reduce his insulin and soon had his catheter removed. When he told the dietitian about his new diet, she hit the roof. That gave me a lot of satisfaction.
 
Short awnser is no. The only healthy cooking oils if you are going to expose them to heat are coconut oil and palm oil. Olive oil and advocado oil, while low in polyunsaturated fats are high in monounsaturated fats and will oxidize when exposed to heat and thus become toxic, but at a slower rate than seed oils. Check out the chart below, you want to cook in saturated fat as it is stable and very hard to oxidize:

cooking-oil-chemical-compositions.png


For anyone looking for more information on the topic I recommend that you check out Dr. Chris Knobbe presentations about the topic on youtube. I'll post a couple of his talks. The first video is a good overview, the second video is especially interesting as he goes trough the biochemestry in detail about 15 minutes into the video.


 
Last edited:
I eat only olive oil, with the sole rare exception when a food needs to be deep fried and the amount of olive oil used would be prohibitively expensive. In that case, sunflower oil is fine.

Olive oil is a healthy, traditional ingredient with local olive groves and presses dating back for millennia that you can visit, see and touch for yourself, it tastes great, it's light on the stomach, it has a stronger aroma and higher smoke point so you need to use less when cooking, and of course it's perfect for salads too. It's such a versatile ingredient that even plain bread with some salt and olive oil can make for a nice meal.

Note that European Union has an insane law that allows producers to muddle the origins of their olive oil by saying it's a "mixture of olive oils from EU area" instead of specifying the country of origin. I'm very suspicious of this, since it allows manufacturers to pollute their olive oil with artificially extracted press leftovers or low quality olives laundered by being transported from other countries, so I avoid those like hell even if they're cheaper.

Therefore, I'll only buy local olive oils sourced 100% from Dalmatia or Istria - anything else could be a fraud.

I'm not sure how things are in the USA, but olive oil production and import regulations are probably quite stupid there as well, so you have to really do your homework regarding country and/or region of origin, and I'm not sure how to feel about olive oils produced in the cesspit of big agriculture that is California. Just because it has a "similar" climate doesn't mean much, since olive quality is massively affected by soil quality and specific rainfall patterns.
Spot on, I'd also avoid the mishmash EU oil of undisclosed origin. However, what you can buy is oil that is from one specific kind of olive, in relation to Greek oil Koreiniki olive oil is excellent, however, my alltime favourite is the Spanish Hojiblanca olive oil, ie oil only from this specific kind of olive. Italian olive oils also are sometimes made from one specific kind of olive. These olive oils are harder to find and cost a small premium but I find taste far superior.
 
Sunflower is a good, inexpensive and readily available alternative. It tolerates high heat as well.
Anything not good enough for my high end olive oil (such as cleaning the grill, frying fish while camping, etc.) gets sunflower.

Very mild taste so it won't interfere with the food.

All vegitable oils are deodorized, that is why the taste is mild. This site gives a good overview of the steps in vegitable oil production. These oils are highly processed and treated with chemicals, bleach being one of them. In my opinion they are not suitable for human consumption, but rather as biofuel or a lubricant.
 

Lights

Woodpecker
veg oils are not good to eat...

vegeble oils , among many other products sold in supermarkets , are not technically , by definition, food.

they are something which during processing become a. stripped of any and all nutritional value to the poiunt that they become b. toxic and can cause many problems.
 
Last edited:

Miikael

Chicken
From personal experience - all vegetable oils are bad. Yes, I include cold-pressed stuff in there. All of them are toxic in my personal experience. But don`t take my word for it. It is a very easy experiment to do on yourself for let`s say a month.

If you want an explanation to why then consider that seeds(plant parts from which oils are made out of) are very likely the last thing a plant wants you to break down. Makes sense to make them as toxic as possible to likely predators.
 
Just here to add an addendum to my previous post.

In short, there is crap in everything (obviously). As Hamm says in Samuel Beckett's Endgame: "You're on earth! There's no cure for that!"

We must make the healthiest decisions we can, with the budgets we have. There is no magical wonder oil that is 100% perfect. Even too much water is harmful. So any hysteria or excitement around the latest fad should be replaced with tempered awareness of the tried & true.

I remember the low fat & low cholesterol craze of the 80's, the Atkins diet, then designer paleo, and so on.
Eggs yolks were the devil. Red meat was taboo. Grains were great. It can be hard to keep up.

I think the Raw Egg Nationalist type stuff and a return to traditional masculine diets is good in the face of globo homo soy-in-everything. It's infinitely preferable. But I think it has a reactionary element as part of its appeal. There is a novelty there that many young men are discovering.

But remember that many of the golden and silver era bodybuilders died early of massive heart attacks. It's unnatural to consume that much fat and animal protein constantly. It's also unnatural to walk around with so much muscle mass, and to take all those drugs...but that's another issue for another thread.

We should look at health as a balance of intensity and longevity.

If living the longest possible life is your goal, then perhaps a diet of steamed string beans and water will get you there. But you will be very thin and weak. Similarly, if you want to be as big and strong as possible it will shave some years off your life. The choice is yours.

So our diets should be balanced.
Lean meats, fish, nuts, seeds, fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, some grains, some dairy. Just avoid processed food, sugar and soy and you are good to go.

I disagree with the "don't eat any plant oils ever!" crowd. Many studies have shown the Mediterranean diet to be one of the healthiest, and its adherents live the longest. It relies heavily on olive oil. The problems arise when things are overly processed. Just as important is what the oil is stored in -- fat can leech up the BPA and other chemicals from plastic, especially when heated by sunlight. Go for glass.

- Canola is not even a real plant so it's out. Geese won't touch canola in the fields.
- Vegetable oil no way
- Coconut is ok, but it's almost pure saturated fat. It is possible to consume too much.
- Butter is similar to coconut oil, though a little less saturated fat. Ok but not too much.
- Avocado is ok
- Sunflower is ok in my experience. I don't consume high amounts of it.
- Cold pressed, extra-virgin olive is great (but not for high heat cooking)
- Beef fat and pork lard are ok. They are not as high in saturated fat as butter & coconut oil

Just my opinion based on many years living a healthy life and coming from a health-conscious family.
As stated in the self-defense thread I started playing hockey at a very young age and began weight lifting and boxing at 14. Got into natural bodybuilding in my early 20's. I still have solid muscle mass, no excess body fat, good cardio conditioning, healthy skin and hair. I have lots of energy and do not look or feel my age. I know genetics are a factor but I'm obviously doing something right with my choice and quantity of fats.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Gotta be real careful with avocado oil, they often cut that with other stuff.

To get the best olive oil, look for one that has a harvest date and location on the bottle.
But it's often multiple countries in one bottle. That seems suspicious to me. It's tough to find single origin olive oil in supermarkets.
 
Top