Are vegetable oils safe to eat?

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I recently realized that pretty much all bacon has added sugar. I avoid all cured and processed bacon. Added nitrates and nitrites are really bad. Even the mainstream media is aware of this. But what's shocking is that even the most expensive "all natural, organic" bacon has added sugar 90% of the time. So much for saving my bacon fat to use as general cooking oil.
So you're really just eating cooked pork belly?

As @Cavalier said, the curing process is what makes bacon bacon. By removing the sugar, salt, and the curing salts (AKA Prague powder #2), you are eating pork belly. Tasty, but not bacon.

And FYI, sodium nitrites and nitrates aren't dangerous. Humans have been using curing salts for a millenia to safely preserve meat and prevent botulism. The amount of nitrite present in cured meat (even store bought meats) is comparable to what is found in raw vegetables like spinach and celery.

The demonization of smoked and cured meat is another attempt by (((them))) to fool you into removing otherwise heathy sources of fat and protein.

People used to make bacon at home as recently up to the 50s and 60s. The manufactured bacon we get at the store isn't made the old way. It's made using an injection of salt, sugar, liquid smoke, and curing salt. It's then packaged and cures on the way to the stores.

There isn't anything wrong with sugar, especially white sugar, in moderate doses.

If you are still worried about the sugar content, you can make your own bacon by smothering pork belly in a sugar, salt, and a small amount of curing salt. Place inside of a ziplock bag and turn it over once a day in your fridge. Wait 7 days to fully cure.

Once 7 days have passed, pull the bacon out of the bag and rinse it in your sink to remove the excess brine solution. At this point, you can either cook it up or hot/cold smoke it. I like to cool smoke it in my smoker overnight using hickory pellets in a pellet maze. I then vac seal it and let it hang out for another month to mellow the smoke flavor.
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
I am going to try out 'peanut oil', have a small bottle of it waiting to be opened - is that one safe? It tolerates high temperatures well.

Olive oil butter are the main ones I use, but since this threat I am getting scared of canola and sunflower, which I also used to occasionally use. Probably canola is like margarine chemically which I already don't eat so why take it in in liquid form? Sunflower maybe isn't as bad.
 

inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I am going to try out 'peanut oil', have a small bottle of it waiting to be opened - is that one safe? It tolerates high temperatures well.

Olive oil butter are the main ones I use, but since this threat I am getting scared of canola and sunflower, which I also used to occasionally use. Probably canola is like margarine chemically which I already don't eat so why take it in in liquid form? Sunflower maybe isn't as bad.
Why use anything that isn't butter?
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
Why use anything that isn't butter?
Olive oil has a good reputation (as well) but maybe you don't like the taste of it.

The peanut oil is an experiment, will post if there is any noteworthy outcomes with cooking. I tried avocado oil at one point but could not stand the smell or taste.
 

inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Olive oil has a good reputation (as well) but maybe you don't like the taste of it.

The peanut oil is an experiment, will post if there is any noteworthy outcomes with cooking. I tried avocado oil at one point but could not stand the smell or taste.
I like olive oil but I'm curious why even experiment with peanut oil?
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
I like olive oil but I'm curious why even experiment with peanut oil?
Just the high temperature factor - I like to seal each side of a steak quickly but without having butter burn and start smelling and tasting like burned butter. I think that once an oil starts to break down with temperature it gets unhealthy as well.

I found a list of the smoke point temperatures -
Peanut oil is very high, butter is a lot lower. Avocado is higher, but as mentioned, the smell and taste is not for everyone.
 

Brebelle3

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
So you're really just eating cooked pork belly?

As @Cavalier said, the curing process is what makes bacon bacon. By removing the sugar, salt, and the curing salts (AKA Prague powder #2), you are eating pork belly. Tasty, but not bacon.

And FYI, sodium nitrites and nitrates aren't dangerous. Humans have been using curing salts for a millenia to safely preserve meat and prevent botulism. The amount of nitrite present in cured meat (even store bought meats) is comparable to what is found in raw vegetables like spinach and celery.

The demonization of smoked and cured meat is another attempt by (((them))) to fool you into removing otherwise heathy sources of fat and protein.

People used to make bacon at home as recently up to the 50s and 60s. The manufactured bacon we get at the store isn't made the old way. It's made using an injection of salt, sugar, liquid smoke, and curing salt. It's then packaged and cures on the way to the stores.

There isn't anything wrong with sugar, especially white sugar, in moderate doses.

If you are still worried about the sugar content, you can make your own bacon by smothering pork belly in a sugar, salt, and a small amount of curing salt. Place inside of a ziplock bag and turn it over once a day in your fridge. Wait 7 days to fully cure.

Once 7 days have passed, pull the bacon out of the bag and rinse it in your sink to remove the excess brine solution. At this point, you can either cook it up or hot/cold smoke it. I like to cool smoke it in my smoker overnight using hickory pellets in a pellet maze. I then vac seal it and let it hang out for another month to mellow the smoke flavor.
Interesting.

I've stopped eating beef jerky and bacon because of the nitrates.

I was collecting bacon grease from quality bacon, but stopped, again because of nitrates. I love brusel sprouts cooked with bacon fat.

I switched to duck fat and grass-fed butter only. Occasional olive oil.

Appreciate the info.
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Interesting.

I've stopped eating beef jerky and bacon because of the nitrates.

I was collecting bacon grease from quality bacon, but stopped, again because of nitrates. I love brusel sprouts cooked with bacon fat.

I switched to duck fat and grass-fed butter only. Occasional olive oil.

Appreciate the info.
Don't do it, don't give into globohomo! Smoked meats are what make life amazing. My breakfast everyday is 2 strips of bacon and 2 sausages (fried in delicious fat). I too collect bacon fat and use it in all sorts of cooking.

You'll be fine eating nitrites, nitrates, and smoked foods in consumption quantities. If you really want to take your food to the next level, get a smoker and make your own jerky and bacon. It's very easy but takes up a ton of space in your fridge.

Glad to help fren, life without bacon is sad and not nearly as worth living!
You can watch this for how industrially made bacon is done. BACON | How It's Made - YouTube
 
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inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Just the high temperature factor - I like to seal each side of a steak quickly but without having butter burn and start smelling and tasting like burned butter. I think that once an oil starts to break down with temperature it gets unhealthy as well.

I found a list of the smoke point temperatures -
Peanut oil is very high, butter is a lot lower. Avocado is higher, but as mentioned, the smell and taste is not for everyone.
Have you tried ghee/clarified butter?
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I am going to try out 'peanut oil', have a small bottle of it waiting to be opened - is that one safe? It tolerates high temperatures well.

Olive oil butter are the main ones I use, but since this threat I am getting scared of canola and sunflower, which I also used to occasionally use. Probably canola is like margarine chemically which I already don't eat so why take it in in liquid form? Sunflower maybe isn't as bad.
Love peanut oil. Totally fine to use. I've fried thanksgiving turkies in them before. Delicious.
Why use anything that isn't butter?
Use ghee/clarified butter. Regular butter will burn and leave a nasty after taste.
 

SeaEagle

Robin
Catholic
So you're really just eating cooked pork belly?

As @Cavalier said, the curing process is what makes bacon bacon. By removing the sugar, salt, and the curing salts (AKA Prague powder #2), you are eating pork belly. Tasty, but not bacon.

And FYI, sodium nitrites and nitrates aren't dangerous. Humans have been using curing salts for a millenia to safely preserve meat and prevent botulism. The amount of nitrite present in cured meat (even store bought meats) is comparable to what is found in raw vegetables like spinach and celery.

The demonization of smoked and cured meat is another attempt by (((them))) to fool you into removing otherwise heathy sources of fat and protein.

People used to make bacon at home as recently up to the 50s and 60s. The manufactured bacon we get at the store isn't made the old way. It's made using an injection of salt, sugar, liquid smoke, and curing salt. It's then packaged and cures on the way to the stores.

There isn't anything wrong with sugar, especially white sugar, in moderate doses.

If you are still worried about the sugar content, you can make your own bacon by smothering pork belly in a sugar, salt, and a small amount of curing salt. Place inside of a ziplock bag and turn it over once a day in your fridge. Wait 7 days to fully cure.

Once 7 days have passed, pull the bacon out of the bag and rinse it in your sink to remove the excess brine solution. At this point, you can either cook it up or hot/cold smoke it. I like to cool smoke it in my smoker overnight using hickory pellets in a pellet maze. I then vac seal it and let it hang out for another month to mellow the smoke flavor.
I've made bacon a few times in a similar manner, using the vegetable crisper to contain the bacon. I never used curing salt given the short duration and exposure to air. Something like salami I'd be more likely to use curing salt.
 

Stadtaffe

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
Have you tried ghee/clarified butter?
Yes I had a tin of it at one point from an Asian store. Interesting that it is not stored in the fridge when you buy it like regular butter. It makes me think of Indian cooking, they like to use it. It is the same colour as butter but a bit different in texture and smell.
 
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inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Yes I had a tin of it at one point from an Asian store. Interesting that it is not stored in the fridge when you buy it like regular butter. It makes me think of Indian cooking, the like to use it. It is the same colour as butter but a bit different in texture and smell.
Yes you kind of cook the butter proteins a little bit to get a toasty flavor, it's good. Clarified butter is perfect for high temps.
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I've made bacon a few times in a similar manner, using the vegetable crisper to contain the bacon. I never used curing salt given the short duration and exposure to air. Something like salami I'd be more likely to use curing salt.
You'll be fine in that setup. There's a difference in curing salt. Prague powder #1 is used for salami and charcuteries. Prague powder 2 is used for bacon.

I cold smoke my bacon which means I'm leaving it outside in a smoker for 12 hours at temps between 22-50 degrees. A perfect environment for botulism bacteria to form. I'd rather be safe than sorry.
 

Seeker79

Kingfisher
Thanks for the knowledge bomb on nitrites and nitrates. I think moderation is the key here. If you're eating nothing but Spam and Jimmie Dean for every meal then that's bad but having decent quality store brand bacon few times a week is no big deal.

And yes indeed, life without bacon would be very sad.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Some nitrites occur naturally in food, but the food industry regularly adds supplemental nitrite for preservation (i.e. shelf life). The dose is the poison. I imagine what they add dwarfs what naturally occurs. If nitrites are in the ingredients label, they added it.
 

nampa1234

 
Banned
The Paleo people were on to this quite a few years back. A lot of you won't like to hear this, but bread isn't really good for you. It causes all kinds of inflammation and gut issues due to the lectin and gluten contained in bread.
I'm pretty sure gluten is a scam. Like only Jews, with their severe inbred metabolic problems, have this issue.
However, proper bread is impossible to buy, particularly the crucial sprouting process being eliminated in the mid-20th Century, and the high yield white wheat not being very healthy. (Organic, old World wheats aren't enough.)
 
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